Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Marylouise Caldwell, Steve Elliot, Paul Henry and Marcus O'Connor

Despite consumers being essential stakeholders in the exponential growth of the sharing economy, consumers’ attitudes towards their rights and responsibilities are…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite consumers being essential stakeholders in the exponential growth of the sharing economy, consumers’ attitudes towards their rights and responsibilities are relatively unknown. This study aims to test a novel hypothesised model mapping consumers’ attitudes towards their consumer rights and responsibilities with that of their political ideology (liberalism, conservatism and libertarianism) and moral foundations (avoiding harm/fairness, in-group/loyalty, authority/respect and purity/sanctity).

Design/methodology/approach

Two survey studies were conducted with consumers of the Uber ride share service; the first being to test measures of political ideology and consumer rights/responsibilities. These measures were then taken into the second study along with the Moral Foundations Questionnaire. The hypothesised model was tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings suggest that political ideology associates with similarities and differences in how consumers perceive their rights and responsibilities in the sharing economy, including mutual self-regulation. Support for these findings is established by identifying links with specific moral foundations.

Research limitations/implications

This study considers a single participant in the sharing economy.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2018

Ellen Garbarino, Paul Henry and Sally Kerfoot

An increasing array of policies have been suggested to combat rising obesity. Regardless of the policy intervention that is selected each comes with a cost in the form of…

Abstract

Purpose

An increasing array of policies have been suggested to combat rising obesity. Regardless of the policy intervention that is selected each comes with a cost in the form of imposition on the public purse, or regulative restrictions on business or individuals. Consequently, potential opposition makes it critical to garner sufficient public support for whichever policy is selected. The purpose of this paper is to explore the ability of attributional framing for the causes of obesity (framed around locus of control and controllability) to increase support for a range of policy interventions designed to reduce obesity.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an online panel, the authors manipulate the perceived cause of obesity along the internal/external locus and controllability/uncontrollability dimensions to assess whether attribution of causes of obesity can influence support for policy interventions that either encourage positive behaviour or discourage negative behaviour.

Findings

The authors find that framing the causes of obesity to emphasise internal/external locus and controllability/uncontrollability has significant and predictable effects on policy support for men but not for women. In this American study, they show that men are more open to persuasion because their views on the causes of obesity are less firmly held than women.

Practical implications

Highlighting the external and controllable causes of obesity was the most effective, suggesting that emphasising the role of the food industry in obesity can garner public support amongst males for a broad range of policy types. The limited effectiveness with women suggests that media focus be directed at male-oriented channels and outlets.

Originality/value

The authors show that, at least amongst men, attribution framing can be used as a tool to increase support for policy interventions to prevent obesity.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Paul Henry

Defines e‐learning as the appropriate application of the Internet to support the delivery of learning, skills and knowledge in a holistic approach not limited to any…

5507

Abstract

Defines e‐learning as the appropriate application of the Internet to support the delivery of learning, skills and knowledge in a holistic approach not limited to any particular courses, technologies, or infrastructures. It considers e‐learning core products of content, technology, and services. The emphasis is upon the importance of integrated learning paths that vary according to the student, the subject material, the level of competence, and corporate or student preferences. Successful implementation of e‐learning requires the same management commitment as other mission‐critical organisation‐wide initiatives. Most of all e‐learning needs to be compelling to the audience it targets, offering the learner a resource that is seen as appealing, valuable and productive to their goals and aspirations.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 43 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Paul Henry

302

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Paul Henry

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of self‐fulfillment motivation in shaping lifestyles. Gewirth's conceptualization is delineated in which self‐fulfillment…

1602

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of self‐fulfillment motivation in shaping lifestyles. Gewirth's conceptualization is delineated in which self‐fulfillment occurs when one's deepest aspirations and best capabilities are brought to fruition.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 21 depth interviews were conducted in informants' homes in Sydney, Australia. Informants consisted of males in the mature end of their working life. Age ranged from 49 to 60 years. The interview guide was designed to capture multiple aspects of self‐concept, lifestyle and activities. An interpretive analytic stance was adopted drawing on the transcriptions and in‐home observations to identify systematic patterns.

Findings

Aspects of lifestyle where self‐fulfillment is experienced form focal points for lifestyle adaptation. The experience is energizing and gives meaning to life. However, the choices and direction of fulfillment satisfaction is bounded by specific aspirations and capabilities of the individual. Informants typically found fulfillment from multiples spheres encompassing work and non‐work arenas. Each sphere represents a metaphoric “magnetic point” directed by the match between deepest aspirations and best capabilities of the individual.

Originality/value

The use of self‐fulfillment as a tool for lifestyle analysis is illustrated. The learnings contribute understanding of the motivations behind the choice of specific lifestyle activities that an individual pursues.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Kari Bosma, Audrey C. Rule and Karla S. Krueger

Graphic novels can contribute to effective content area reading on social studies topics such as the American Revolution. This action research study’s purpose was to…

Abstract

Graphic novels can contribute to effective content area reading on social studies topics such as the American Revolution. This action research study’s purpose was to examine student recall of facts, enjoyment of reading, and interest in the topic when using graphic novels as compared to illustrated nonfiction prose in social studies content area reading. Twenty-two fifth grade students (13 females, 9 males) in a public school in a Midwestern state participated in the study. Half of the students read about the Boston Massacre and Patrick Henry through graphic novels and read about Paul Revere and the Boston Tea Party with illustrated nonfiction texts, with the other half doing the opposite. The mean number of correct ideas recalled by students two weeks after reading two books in the graphic novel condition was 8.6 compared to 7.1 for the nonfiction prose condition with a medium effect size. Students rated their reading enjoyment significantly higher in the graphic novel condition indicating that graphic novels should be employed more often into the school curriculum. Suggestions for integrating graphic novels into the curriculum are provided along with other ways to take action.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 4 May 2022

ECOWAS threatened to impose sanctions for failure to comply, but has subsequently granted a short although undefined extension. The junta under coup leader President Paul

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB269958

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Paul A. Rogers

Best practice facility management operations share several common traits, and two in particular stand out above the rest: outstanding leadership and clarity of purpose…

Abstract

Best practice facility management operations share several common traits, and two in particular stand out above the rest: outstanding leadership and clarity of purpose. Achieving the balance between minimum levels of service and minimum cost requires quality information, great planning and, above all, a well‐led, talented and focused team of motivated facilities managers (specialists and generalists) operating from a clear purpose of intent. This paper examines the benefits of taking a ‘high performance business unit’ approach to facility department management using a smarter mixture and application of skill sets and process management which ensures the best value service delivery outcomes are achieved and that clarity of purpose becomes the norm.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Abstract

Details

European Origins of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-718-4

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Marylouise Caldwell and Paul Henry

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce six audio‐visual and written pieces that communicate research findings about contemporary popular culture.

1772

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce six audio‐visual and written pieces that communicate research findings about contemporary popular culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a summary overview of the papers in the special issue, highlighting similarities across submissions as well their distinctive contributions.

Findings

The authors conclude that researchers apply audio‐visual material to communicate their research findings in at least two ways: as stand‐alones to convey key messages; and to validate and/or dramatize highlights of their written work.

Originality/value

The paper provides an introduction to a special issue that features the application of multi‐media to communicate research findings associated with contemporary popular culture.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000