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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Martin Caraher, Paul Dixon, Roy Carr‐Hill, Paul Hayton, Hilary McGough and Lisa Bird

Investigates 1999/2000 health promotion activities in prisons in England and Wales and documents the range and quality of health promotion occurring in prisons, against…

Abstract

Investigates 1999/2000 health promotion activities in prisons in England and Wales and documents the range and quality of health promotion occurring in prisons, against which future activity might be measured. Finds that health promotion is under‐resourced and the concept and practice poorly understood. Health needs assessment tended to be analysis of and for health‐care services and, except in a minority of cases, did not include consultation with staff, prisoners or their families. Where responsibility was shared and the work based on multi‐disciplinary approaches, it seems more likely to have been reported accurately as health promotion activity. The official policy of a healthy settings/whole prison approach was not understood by many and its application was limited. The findings have informed the development of a new health promotion strategy for the prison service in England and Wales.

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Health Education, vol. 102 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Lisa Bird, Paul Hayton, Martin Caraher, Hilary McGough and Clive Tobutt

This paper presents the findings of an investigation into a mental health promotion initiative in young offender institutions across England. The study involved a survey…

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of an investigation into a mental health promotion initiative in young offender institutions across England. The study involved a survey of staff attitudes towards mental health promotion, and surveyed practice run by these staff. Analysis of staff descriptions of mental health promotion revealed a degree of confusion and a lack of clarity over the definition of mental health and mental health promotion. The concept of a mental health promotion initiative which aimed to improve the well‐being of the general inmate and staff population was not a shared vision and not part of the core work of either health care staff or prison officers. It is recommended that any future campaigns on mental health or health promotion should have a central lead, with some flexibility to allow for the development of local initiatives, fostering local relationships and partnerships.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2011

Morag MacDonald, Robert Greifinger and David Kane

Abstract

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International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2019

S. M. Misbauddin and Md. Noor Un Nabi

This chapter is aimed at developing a conceptual framework for the internationalization process of social business (SB). The study has been conducted by reviewing the…

Abstract

This chapter is aimed at developing a conceptual framework for the internationalization process of social business (SB). The study has been conducted by reviewing the literature on social entrepreneurship, SB, and internationalization of small business. The study indicated that the internationalization decision for SB is taken by the motivation to create a social impact in the target foreign location. Based on the analyses and related literature, the entrepreneur-specific, firm-specific, and context-specific factors affecting the internationalization decision of social entrepreneurs are presented. As part of the framework, the chapter explains opportunity identification and the internationalization implementation phases for SBs. One of the key contributions of the chapter is the depiction of an internationalization framework for SB, which is an innovative addition to social entrepreneurship literature. The framework developed here could help social entrepreneurs to take decisions for scaling their businesses internationally.

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2020

Naiara Escribá-Carda, Lorenzo Revuelto-Taboada, Maria Teresa Canet-Giner and Francisco Balbastre-Benavent

This work aims to analyze the effect of employees' perceptions of high-performance work systems (HPWS) on intrapreneurial behavior (IPB), and the potential role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to analyze the effect of employees' perceptions of high-performance work systems (HPWS) on intrapreneurial behavior (IPB), and the potential role of knowledge sharing as a mediating variable in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypothesis testing was performed using a structural equation model (SEM) based on a PLS-SEM approach applied to a sample of 297 knowledge-intensive employees from six industrial companies of the Valencian region (Spain).

Findings

Results confirmed that the relationship between employees' perceptions of HPWS and IPB does not take place directly. Alternatively, this relationship occurs through knowledge sharing of employees.

Originality/value

This study makes theoretical and empirical contributions to better understand the impact of employee's perceptions of HPWS on IPB mediated by knowledge sharing. This work theorized and tested a model where the concept of IPB gains special relevance at academic and practical levels due to its implications for HRM.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2020

Frank Siedlok, Paul Hibbert and Fiona Whitehurst

The purpose of this paper is to develop a more detailed understanding of how embedding in different social networks relates to different types of action that individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a more detailed understanding of how embedding in different social networks relates to different types of action that individuals choose in the context of organizational closures, downsizing or relocations. To develop such insights, this paper focuses on three particular types of social networks, namely, intra-organizational; external professional and local community networks. These three types of networks have been frequently related to different types of action in the context of closures and relocations.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper. The authors develop the argument by integrating relevant recent literature on the salience related to embedding in different types of social networks, with a particular focus on responses to organizational closure or relocation.

Findings

The authors argue that at times of industrial decline and closure: embeddedness in intra-organizational networks can favor collective direct action; embeddedness in professional networks is likely to favor individual direct action and embeddedness in community networks can lead to individual indirect action. The authors then add nuance to the argument by considering a range of complicating factors that can constrain or enable the course (s) of action favored by particular combinations of network influences.

Originality/value

On a theoretical level, this paper adds to understandings of the role of network embeddedness in influencing individual and collective responses to such disruptive events; and direct or indirect forms of response. On a practical level, the authors contribute to understandings about how the employment landscape may evolve in regions affected by organizational demise, and how policymakers may study with or through network influences to develop more responsible downsizing approaches.

Details

Organization Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1541-6518

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Ekaterina S. Bjornali and Liv Anne Støren

This paper aims to examine the effects of individual competencies and characteristics linked to educational programmes that contribute to the development of competencies…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of individual competencies and characteristics linked to educational programmes that contribute to the development of competencies conducive to innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on theories of intrapreneurial competencies – i.e. intrapreneurship and competence‐based innovation – and the entrepreneurship education literature. The study uses comprehensive survey data on approximately 11,000 higher education graduates, five years after graduation in 12 European countries, collected in 2005. The authors test hypotheses regarding the effects of individual competencies and study programme characteristics on the probability of introducing innovations at work, using logistic regression.

Findings

Several kinds of competencies are found to increase the probability that graduates introduce innovations at work: professional and creative, communications and championing, and brokering do so, while productivity/efficiency does not. Education programmes emphasising the development of entrepreneurial skills and problem‐based learning also promote innovation. Graduates in engineering are particularly innovative, whereas business and administration graduates are least innovative.

Research limitations/implications

The central implication is that intrapreneurial competencies are learnable. The results refer specifically to higher educated persons, five years after graduation.

Practical implications

Organisations that aim at stimulating employee‐driven innovation need to emphasise the development of intrapreneurial, and especially, brokering competencies. Higher education institutions should put more emphasis on the development of entrepreneurial competencies, for example through problem‐based learning.

Originality/value

The study makes an empirical contribution to theories of intrapreneurship and competency‐based innovation, by examining a wide range of competencies that promote innovation by graduate professionals in Europe.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Abstract

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Strategy and Geopolitics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-568-9

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2017

Alexandros Papaspyridis and Tatiana Zalan

While the trade sector has long been the backbone of growth followed by real estate development in Dubai, the impact of reduced oil revenues in the Gulf Cooperation…

Abstract

While the trade sector has long been the backbone of growth followed by real estate development in Dubai, the impact of reduced oil revenues in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) has affected Dubai. GCC countries have identified innovation and transitioning to a knowledge-based economy as critical components of sustainable growth in the post-oil world. The purpose of this chapter is twofold: (1) to examine UAE’s competitiveness relative to four economies for which we can draw meaningful conclusions (Qatar, Singapore, Norway, and Switzerland) and (2) to integrate macro- and micro-level findings in an actionable framework. Using the composite Knowledge Economy Index (KEI) developed by the World Bank (2008, 2012), we conclude that UAE should prioritize three key areas to ­transition to a knowledge-based economy: the regulatory regime, innovation, and human capital. These findings are consistent with a recent study by the UAE Department of Economic Development/INSEAD, which highlights two areas that need addressing: “Creation” (knowledge creation) and “Anchoring” (institutional environment for innovation). We integrate these macro-level findings with research at the innovation ecosystem level (and particularly survey-based research completed by Wamda Research Lab) to propose a comprehensive action framework across all ecosystem stakeholders (i.e., government, entrepreneurs, academia, support ecosystem, and corporates). The action matrix allows individual stakeholders to drive corresponding actions and prioritize across short- and long-term initiatives.

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Global Opportunities for Entrepreneurial Growth: Coopetition and Knowledge Dynamics within and across Firms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-502-3

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Dalal Alrubaishi, Helen Haugh, Paul Robson, Rachel Doern and William J. Wales

This study investigates the impact of socioemotional wealth (SEW) on family firm entrepreneurial orientation (EO) in Saudi Arabia, and the moderating effect of…

Abstract

This study investigates the impact of socioemotional wealth (SEW) on family firm entrepreneurial orientation (EO) in Saudi Arabia, and the moderating effect of generational involvement on this relationship. Our data set comprises 241 privately, wholly owned family firms. We examine EO as a strategic orientation expressed in terms of both firm behavior and how managers approach risk-taking attitudinally. Our study finds that SEW is positively related to firms’ entrepreneurial behavior, but not managerial attitudes toward risk-taking. However, the positive effects of SEW on firms’ entrepreneurial behavior diminish as the number of generations involved in the family business increases. The broader implications for enabling entrepreneurship within Arab transforming economies adhering to strong cultural tribalistic norms are discussed.

Details

Entrepreneurial Orientation: Epistemological, Theoretical, and Empirical Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-572-1

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