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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Robert J. Nathan, Paul H.P. Yeow and San Murugesan

This paper aims to report on a web usability study and to identify and prioritise key web interface usability factors (WIUFs) for web sites of 36 student‐related online…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on a web usability study and to identify and prioritise key web interface usability factors (WIUFs) for web sites of 36 student‐related online services categorised into three groups: personal services, purchase services and study‐related web sites.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, involving 400 student internet users (SIUs), 12,310 data points were collected and analysed using a multiple linear regression test. Seven WIUFs were tested: use of colour and font (UCF), use of graphics and multimedia (UGM), clarity of goals in web site (CGW), trustworthiness of web site (TOW), interactivity of web site (IOW), ease of web navigation (EWN), and download speed of web site (DSOW).

Findings

The study results reveal that every online service category has a different set of crucial WIUFs. SIUs' web usability preferences were compared with those of general internet users.

Research limitations/implications

The participants were all Malaysians; therefore, generalising the findings to all SIUs will require a confirmatory study with SIUs from other parts of the world.

Practical implications

Web developers can use the results to design usable web sites for specific online service categories.

Originality/value

The research offers a simpler alternative to measure web usability and to determine which WIUFs are crucial for a specific online service category with consideration of the users' role. This study overcomes some weaknesses of previous studies, i.e. small sample size, no consideration of product‐task relationship, no specific customer group and cumbersome procedures.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Majharul Talukder and Paul H.P. Yeow

The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical, marketing, and cultural differences between virtual communities in an industrially developing country, i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical, marketing, and cultural differences between virtual communities in an industrially developing country, i.e. Bangladesh, and an industrially developed country, i.e. the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 33 virtual community sites from both countries were randomly selected and evaluated based on eight criteria relating to technical, marketing, and cross‐cultural aspects. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance and χ2‐square statistics to identify the similarities and differences between the two countries’ virtual community sites.

Findings

The study found significant differences between the countries in the use of graphics and images, the amount of advertisement and promotional messages, the choices of language, the inclusion of religious content, the frequency of message concerning group welfare, equality and loyalty, and the number of structured messages. The study also found some similarities in navigational efficiency and online product information. In conclusion, the research found gaps in the technical, marketing, and cultural aspects between virtual communities in the industrially developing and developed countries.

Research limitations/implications

The research used only 15 Bangladeshi virtual community sites due to the limited number of sites in the country.

Originality/value

Recommendations are made to narrow the gaps and enhance the effectiveness of virtual communities in the industrially developing country. This will help web developers produce better virtual community websites and help marketers understand virtual community users from different countries and cultures. In addition, the present research method is useful to replicate similar research in other industrially developing countries such as China and India and thus provide insights for improvements.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Yee Yen Yuen, Paul HP Yeow and Nena Lim

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cultural differences in internet banking adoption between the USA and Malaysia. It aims to provide marketing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cultural differences in internet banking adoption between the USA and Malaysia. It aims to provide marketing recommendations based on specific cultural dimensions to promote internet banking.

Design/methodology/approach

With four added variables (attitude towards use, perceived credibility, self-efficacy, and anxiety), the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology model was used. A questionnaire was developed based on the research model and distributed to 1,050 internet banking users from two countries. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was applied to 666 valid questionnaires to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Results show that due to cultural differences, global consumers have different internet banking adoption patterns. Consumers in the USA have a more positive attitude towards use. Moreover, perceived credibility plays an important role in influencing internet banking in the USA. On the other hand, performance expectancy has a direct influence on internet banking adoption in Malaysia. Cultural dimensions such as individualism/collectivism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, monochronic/polychromic, and high context/low context were used to explain these findings. Based on the findings, marketing recommendations that help promote internet banking in both countries were provided.

Originality/value

This is the one of the pioneer studies that highlights the importance of cultural differences in promoting internet banking services. It contributes to the literature by developing and testing a comprehensive research model using SEM.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Nripendra P. Rana, Yogesh K. Dwivedi and Michael D. Williams

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the performance of the alternative IS/IT adoption models used more frequently in the citizen centric adoption of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the performance of the alternative IS/IT adoption models used more frequently in the citizen centric adoption of e‐government systems. Such analysis will not only provide a trend about the models and subsequent constructs being utilized in this area of research but also guides us toward laying a foundation for the formulation of an alternative integrated model for citizen centric adoption of e‐government services.

Design/methodology/approach

The relevant secondary data from 87 research studies on citizen centric e‐government services were analysed to examine the performance of some of the most frequently used alternative models (e.g. technology acceptance model (TAM), diffusion of innovation|innovation diffusion theory (DOI|IDT), DeLone and McLean IS success model, unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT), and theory of planned behaviour (TPB)) of IS/IT adoption in this area of research.

Findings

The findings of this research indicate that TAM is by far the best suited model for analysing citizen centric adoption of e‐government services. It was also found that although diffusion of innovation|innovation diffusion theory (DOI|IDT) is the second highly used model, only three of its constructs (i.e. compatibility, complexity, and relative advantage) were in use across various studies. Moreover, it was visualised that constructs such as triability and observability were never used in the e‐government context. Similarly, the constructs from TPB have not been used up to the presence of the model across various studies. All the constructs (i.e. performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence) of the UTAUT model, except facilitating conditions, have been used quite regularly.

Research limitations/implications

This research evaluates the various IS/IT adoption research models being used in e‐government adoption only on the basis of their performances across the existing research studies. The evaluation of the performance of such models may not reflect their true picture only through meta‐analysis.

Originality/value

This paper presents a comprehensive meta‐analysis of some of the most frequently used IS/IT adoption models in the context of e‐government adoption research. Such analysis would help us picking up the most appropriate models and/or their constructs for developing an alternative model for our research.

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2015

Dekar Urumsah

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally…

Abstract

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally. This is especially relevant in the context of Indonesian Airline companies. Therefore, many airline customers in Indonesia are still in doubt about it, or even do not use it. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for e-services adoption and empirically examines the factors influencing the airlines customers in Indonesia in using e-services offered by the Indonesian airline companies. Taking six Indonesian airline companies as a case example, the study investigated the antecedents of e-services usage of Indonesian airlines. This study further examined the impacts of motivation on customers in using e-services in the Indonesian context. Another important aim of this study was to investigate how ages, experiences and geographical areas moderate effects of e-services usage.

The study adopts a positivist research paradigm with a two-phase sequential mixed method design involving qualitative and quantitative approaches. An initial research model was first developed based on an extensive literature review, by combining acceptance and use of information technology theories, expectancy theory and the inter-organizational system motivation models. A qualitative field study via semi-structured interviews was then conducted to explore the present state among 15 respondents. The results of the interviews were analysed using content analysis yielding the final model of e-services usage. Eighteen antecedent factors hypotheses and three moderating factors hypotheses and 52-item questionnaire were developed. A focus group discussion of five respondents and a pilot study of 59 respondents resulted in final version of the questionnaire.

In the second phase, the main survey was conducted nationally to collect the research data among Indonesian airline customers who had already used Indonesian airline e-services. A total of 819 valid questionnaires were obtained. The data was then analysed using a partial least square (PLS) based structural equation modelling (SEM) technique to produce the contributions of links in the e-services model (22% of all the variances in e-services usage, 37.8% in intention to use, 46.6% in motivation, 39.2% in outcome expectancy, and 37.7% in effort expectancy). Meanwhile, path coefficients and t-values demonstrated various different influences of antecedent factors towards e-services usage. Additionally, a multi-group analysis based on PLS is employed with mixed results. In the final findings, 14 hypotheses were supported and 7 hypotheses were not supported.

The major findings of this study have confirmed that motivation has the strongest contribution in e-services usage. In addition, motivation affects e-services usage both directly and indirectly through intention-to-use. This study provides contributions to the existing knowledge of e-services models, and practical applications of IT usage. Most importantly, an understanding of antecedents of e-services adoption will provide guidelines for stakeholders in developing better e-services and strategies in order to promote and encourage more customers to use e-services. Finally, the accomplishment of this study can be expanded through possible adaptations in other industries and other geographical contexts.

Details

E-services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-709-7

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2017

Abstract

Details

No Business is an Island
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-550-4

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Bieke Struyf, Serena Galvani, Paul Matthyssens and Roberta Bocconcelli

The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical lens on digital servitization (DS) for future research purposes. By developing a multilevel framework that helps…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical lens on digital servitization (DS) for future research purposes. By developing a multilevel framework that helps structure and untangle its complexity, the authors aim to increase understanding into the persistent challenge of DS.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on a problematization approach, critical incident technique was applied to a comparative, longitudinal, multiple-case study in which DS journeys from one Italian and one Belgian manufacturing firm were analyzed.

Findings

Analysis revealed that different levels and elements of the multilevel framework were simultaneously involved in the identified critical incidents. This huge interconnectedness severely challenged the DS journeys. Managerial (un)responsiveness played a central role in the organizational outcome for both firms.

Originality/value

The authors answer the call for a more holistic approach toward DS. A multilevel framework is provided to be employed by future researchers and practitioners alike. A mid-range theory for DS and propositions for future research are developed.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2017

Robin Martin, Olga Epitropaki and Laurie O’Broin

Leadership training has led to a large amount of research due to the belief that such training can lead to (or more precisely cause) positive changes in followers…

Abstract

Leadership training has led to a large amount of research due to the belief that such training can lead to (or more precisely cause) positive changes in followers’ behavior and work performance. This chapter describes some of the conditions necessary for research to show a causal relationship between leadership training and outcomes. It then describes different research designs, employed in leadership training research, and considers the types of problems that can affect inferences about causality. The chapter focuses on the role of randomization of leaders (e.g., into training vs. non-training conditions) as a key methodological procedure and alludes to problems of achieving this in field settings.

Details

Methodological Challenges and Advances in Managerial and Organizational Cognition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-677-0

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Brian T. Pentland, Peng Liu, Waldemar Kremser and Thorvald Hærem

Using a routine dynamics perspective, the authors address a central question in a practice-driven institutional theory: where does change come from? In particular, the…

Abstract

Using a routine dynamics perspective, the authors address a central question in a practice-driven institutional theory: where does change come from? In particular, the authors focus on the possibility that small variations in routines can accumulate into big changes in institutions. The analysis is limited strictly to endogenous change. The authors use narrative networks to formalize and operationalize key concepts, such as variation and change. The authors reinterpret results from a published simulation model (Pentland, Liu, Kremser, & Hærem, 2020) that examined endogenous change in organizational routines. The simulation suggests that over a wide range of conditions, minor variations can lead to irreversible structural changes in routines. In the absence of exogenous shocks and institutional entrepreneurs, patterns of action that were previously possible can become impossible. The mechanism underlying these changes requires both accumulation and forgetting. Without forgetting, small variations may pile up (like dirty laundry), but they will not result in big changes.

Details

On Practice and Institution: New Empirical Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-416-5

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Yeow Tong Chia

The purpose of the paper is to examine the conceptions of Chineseness and the perceptions of China in Ontario's High School History Curriculum from 1945 to the end of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine the conceptions of Chineseness and the perceptions of China in Ontario's High School History Curriculum from 1945 to the end of the 1980s.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the syllabus and textbooks in the period that were taught in schools in Ontario. Curriculum guidelines and documents published by the Ontario Department (later Ministry) of Education were studied, as well as the Circular 14, which lists the approved textbooks from which the textbooks where chosen for this paper. The impact-response and tradition-modernity approaches to the study and writing of Chinese enabled the unpacking of the western-centric presuppositions in the textbooks.

Findings

From the onset, the Chinese history that was taught and presented was a western-centric one. The paper demonstrates that post Second World War Chinese history that was taught via the Ontario High School History Curriculum and textbooks reflected a view of Chineseness that regards the Chinese and the Chinese civilization was regarded as essentialized, backward and static vis-à-vis the modern West. Implicit in such a conception of Chineseness is that of western superiority over the Chinese civilization.

Originality/value

There have been few studies on how the history of Asia is represented in Canadian school history. Knowing how Chinese history is represented in Ontario High Schools is an interesting case study of how white settler societies viewed and understood China. This study also sheds light on the broader issue of the problematic at play when Asian history is taught and represented in other white settler societies like Australia, New Zealand and the USA.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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