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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

John Garger, Paul H. Jacques, Brian W. Gastle and Christine M. Connolly

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that common method variance, specifically single-source bias, threatens the validity of a university-created student assessment…

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1283

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that common method variance, specifically single-source bias, threatens the validity of a university-created student assessment of instructor instrument, suggesting that decisions made from these assessments are inherently flawed or skewed. Single-source bias leads to generalizations about assessments that might influence the ability of raters to separate multiple behaviors of an instructor.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory factor analysis, nested confirmatory factor analysis and within-and-between analysis are used to assess a university-developed, proprietary student assessment of instructor instrument to determine whether a hypothesized factor structure is identifiable. The instrument was developed over a three-year period by a university-mandated committee.

Findings

Findings suggest that common method variance, specifically single-source bias, resulted in the inability to identify hypothesized constructs statistically. Additional information is needed to identify valid instruments and an effective collection method for assessment.

Practical implications

Institutions are not guaranteed valid or useful instruments even if they invest significant time and resources to produce one. Without accurate instrumentation, there is insufficient information to assess constructs for teaching excellence. More valid measurement criteria can result from using multiple methods, altering collection times and educating students to distinguish multiple traits and behaviors of individual instructors more accurately.

Originality/value

This paper documents the three-year development of a university-wide student assessment of instructor instrument and carries development through to examining the psychometric properties and appropriateness of using this instrument to evaluate instructors.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Robert Barbato, Richard De Martino and Paul H. Jacques

A nonemployer business is one that has no paid employees.The number and revenues of nonemployer businesses are increasing at a faster rate than other businesses, and they…

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1190

Abstract

A nonemployer business is one that has no paid employees.The number and revenues of nonemployer businesses are increasing at a faster rate than other businesses, and they are an increasingly important alternative to other forms of entrepreneurship.Yet very little is known about these businesses. This study uses a survey of 1,600 MBA alumni to compare the entrepreneurial motivations of nonemployer entrepreneurs to conventional entrepreneurs and no entrepreneurs. The findings indicate that nonemployer entrepreneurs differ in important ways, and future research is needed to understand more fully this large and important group of entrepreneurs.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Paul H. Jacques, John Garger and Michael Thomas

The purpose of this research was to explore the leadership style of graduate project management students vs other MBA students.

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5793

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to explore the leadership style of graduate project management students vs other MBA students.

Design/methodology/approach

Graduate project management and MBA students attending a regional comprehensive university in USA returned surveys that assess their leadership style emphasis of concern for task or concern for people.

Findings

Project management students rate themselves significantly higher on the concern for people leadership style and were found to have a balance between the concern for task and concern for people leadership style vs MBA students.

Practical implications

Individuals exhibiting a concern for people leadership style and those with a balance between concern for task and concern for people leadership styles are good candidates for project management positions as well as training/education in project management.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the selection and training of project managers based on bahavioral tendencies can relate to project success.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

John Garger and Paul H. Jacques

The purpose of this paper is to explore student perceptions of instructor leader behaviors from a levels of analysis perspective. Analyses were conducted to determine if…

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1513

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore student perceptions of instructor leader behaviors from a levels of analysis perspective. Analyses were conducted to determine if an average leadership style, a vertical dyad linkages style, or a leader‐member exchange leadership style operated within the college context.

Design/methodology/approach

Students in a mid‐sized, public university completed surveys to assess perceptions of instructors' intellectual stimulation and individualized consideration leader behaviors. Within and between analysis was used to determine how leadership operates within this educational environment.

Findings

Results suggest that a leader‐member exchange relationship exists between students and instructors. For leadership to have any effect on students at the instructor level, a dedication to giving instructors the freedom to express their individual beliefs and values must be in place before students can take advantage of an instructor's unique approach to leadership.

Research/limitations/implications

Generalizability to other universities is limited due to the sample used in this study. However, the methods and information provided in this study represent a framework for assessing student perceptions of instructor leadership in any educational environment.

Originality/value

The paper explores instructor leader behaviors from a levels of analysis point of view and dicusses explanations for the LMX results.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

John Garger, Michael Thomas and Paul H. Jacques

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the predictive validity of several antecedents to students' early perceptions of future performance in collegiate courses.

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1391

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the predictive validity of several antecedents to students' early perceptions of future performance in collegiate courses.

Design/methodology/approach

A non‐experimental design was used to test a proposed model based on a review of relevant literature. Students completed surveys capturing the constructs researched.

Findings

Students' internal locus of control predicted student perceptions of social integration, academic self concept and grade point average (GPA) and social integration significantly predicted academic self concept. Moreover, academic self concept significantly predicted early perceptions of expected grade beyond the student's current level of performance as measured by his/her current GPA.

Research limitations/implications

Subjects were from one academic program in one university. Also, expected performance was measured with one item, which focused on expected grade, only one aspect of performance. Other aspects of performance and outcomes such as perceived learning or satisfaction with the course could shed more light on the relationships among the constructs under study

Practical implications

Students with an internal locus of control orientation can better leverage self‐confidence to social and academic ends in the classroom and more readily exhibit the sustained goal‐related behaviors requisite for success during transitions to college and subsequent professional placements. Also, students who are encouraged to take personal responsibility for relationships with peers and adjust behaviors are likely to maintain and enhance the quality of these relationships.

Originality/value

The paper's results suggest that instructors who foster/reinforce students' concept of connections between choices and outcomes may be rewarded with enhanced student motivation to perform well in the course.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

John Conway O'Brien

A collection of essays by a social economist seeking to balanceeconomics as a science of means with the values deemed necessary toman′s finding the good life and society…

Abstract

A collection of essays by a social economist seeking to balance economics as a science of means with the values deemed necessary to man′s finding the good life and society enduring as a civilized instrumentality. Looks for authority to great men of the past and to today′s moral philosopher: man is an ethical animal. The 13 essays are: 1. Evolutionary Economics: The End of It All? which challenges the view that Darwinism destroyed belief in a universe of purpose and design; 2. Schmoller′s Political Economy: Its Psychic, Moral and Legal Foundations, which centres on the belief that time‐honoured ethical values prevail in an economy formed by ties of common sentiment, ideas, customs and laws; 3. Adam Smith by Gustav von Schmoller – Schmoller rejects Smith′s natural law and sees him as simply spreading the message of Calvinism; 4. Pierre‐Joseph Proudhon, Socialist – Karl Marx, Communist: A Comparison; 5. Marxism and the Instauration of Man, which raises the question for Marx: is the flowering of the new man in Communist society the ultimate end to the dialectical movement of history?; 6. Ethical Progress and Economic Growth in Western Civilization; 7. Ethical Principles in American Society: An Appraisal; 8. The Ugent Need for a Consensus on Moral Values, which focuses on the real dangers inherent in there being no consensus on moral values; 9. Human Resources and the Good Society – man is not to be treated as an economic resource; man′s moral and material wellbeing is the goal; 10. The Social Economist on the Modern Dilemma: Ethical Dwarfs and Nuclear Giants, which argues that it is imperative to distinguish good from evil and to act accordingly: existentialism, situation ethics and evolutionary ethics savour of nihilism; 11. Ethical Principles: The Economist′s Quandary, which is the difficulty of balancing the claims of disinterested science and of the urge to better the human condition; 12. The Role of Government in the Advancement of Cultural Values, which discusses censorship and the funding of art against the background of the US Helms Amendment; 13. Man at the Crossroads draws earlier themes together; the author makes the case for rejecting determinism and the “operant conditioning” of the Skinner school in favour of the moral progress of autonomous man through adherence to traditional ethical values.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 19 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 1996

Abstract

Details

The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

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Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

John Garger, Veselina P. Vracheva and Paul Jacques

Although extant literature links overstimulation to various job outcomes, most studies do not consider a service-learning context, and they suggest a linear association…

Abstract

Purpose

Although extant literature links overstimulation to various job outcomes, most studies do not consider a service-learning context, and they suggest a linear association between stimuli and outcomes. This paper examines the link between the number of service-learning hours students work and three educational outcomes – student satisfaction with the service-learning project, class relevancy to the service-learning project and expected community involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying activation theory and Yerkes–Dodson law, we test curvilinear relationships between service-learning hours and student outcomes.

Findings

Results suggest that students benefit from service learning up to a certain duration of a service-learning project.

Originality/value

This study identifies the tipping point of the number of service-learning hours beyond which students perceive decrements to three outcomes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Paul Henman

Attempts to establish the extent to which the use of computers in Australia’s Department of Social Security (DSS) has facilitated changes in social security policy and its…

Abstract

Attempts to establish the extent to which the use of computers in Australia’s Department of Social Security (DSS) has facilitated changes in social security policy and its administration. Bases findings on case studies relating to two new DSS policies, supplemented with documentary evidence. Identifies that computers are used in the DSS for six main purposes ‐ administering, automating, protecting, monitoring and evaluating policy, as well as for modelling future policy options. Identifies that, instead of increasing efficiency in administration, computers have simply increased productivity by enabling administrative practices to be extended into new areas; observes an emerging computer‐dependent culture dominated by quantitative (rather than qualitative) practices. Establishes that the flexibility offered by computer technology has also contributed to the introduction of more complex social security policies. Concludes that computer technology has contributed to the formulation and administration of social security policies.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1906

IT is fitting that a new series of this magazine should be introduced by some reflections on the whole question of book selection, both for the general public and libraries.

Abstract

IT is fitting that a new series of this magazine should be introduced by some reflections on the whole question of book selection, both for the general public and libraries.

Details

New Library World, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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