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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Paul Gooding, Melissa Terras and Linda Berube

To date, there has been little research into users of the Legal Deposit Libraries (Non-Print Works) Regulations 2013. This paper addresses that gap by presenting key…

Abstract

Purpose

To date, there has been little research into users of the Legal Deposit Libraries (Non-Print Works) Regulations 2013. This paper addresses that gap by presenting key findings from the AHRC-funded Digital Library Futures project. Its purpose is to present a “user-centric” perspective on the potential future impact of the digital collections that are being created under electronic legal deposit regulations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilises a mixed methods case study of two academic legal deposit libraries in the United Kingdom: The Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford; and Cambridge University Library. It combines surveys of users, web log analysis and expert interviews with librarians and cognate professionals.

Findings

User perspectives on NPLD were not fully considered in the planning and implementation of the 2013 regulations. The authors present findings from their user survey to show how contemporary tensions between user behaviour and access protocols risk limiting the instrumental value of NPLD collections, which have high perceived legacy value.

Originality/value

This is the first study to address the user context for UK Non-Print Legal Deposit. Its value lies in presenting a research-led user assessment of NPLD and in proposing “user-centric” analysis as an addition to the existing “four pillars” of legal deposit research.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2016

Sinéad Harmey and Emily Rodgers

To identify features of teacher support associated with children who made accelerated progress in writing in an early literacy intervention.

Abstract

Purpose

To identify features of teacher support associated with children who made accelerated progress in writing in an early literacy intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods were used to describe the paths, rates, variability, and potential sources of change in the writing development of 24 first grade students who participated in an early literacy intervention for 20 weeks. To describe the breadth and variability of change in children’s writing within a co-constructed setting, two groups who made high and low progress were identified.

Findings

We focus on one child, Paul, who made high progress (became more independent in the writing of linguistically complex messages) and the features of teacher support that this child received compared to those who made lower progress. We compare him to another child, Emma, who made low progress. Teacher support associated with high progress included a conversational style and flexibility to adapt to the child’s message intent as the student composed, supporting students to write linguistically more complex and legible messages, and supporting students to orchestrate a broad range of problem-solving behaviors while writing.

Practical implications

We describe how teachers can support children to gradually take control of the composition process, how they can recognize complexity in early written messages and we provide suggestions as to how teachers can systematically assess, observe, and support children’s self-regulation of the writing process.

Details

Writing Instruction to Support Literacy Success
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-525-6

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Justin Paul

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of theoretical models and studies dealing with the international marketing strategies in emerging markets and provides…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of theoretical models and studies dealing with the international marketing strategies in emerging markets and provides recommendations for future research based on the review.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of literature on the topic was conducted and a new model is developed as a theoretical extension on the basis of insights from prior research.

Findings

Organizations need to take into account several characteristics of consumers and markets in advance as part of their business plan to select appropriate emerging markets, and decide best possible entry modes.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, there is no comprehensive review article on this subject, which provides directions for future research. The authors fill this gap in the literature and suggest strategies with regard to market selection, entry modes, market adaptation, customer relationship development with a new four-dimensional model.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Edward J. O'Boyle

The purpose of this paper is to present a perspective on need that derives from a personalism which is grounded in Catholic social thought and runs counter to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a perspective on need that derives from a personalism which is grounded in Catholic social thought and runs counter to the individualism of mainstream economics, focusing on need in the context of three economic activities: consumption, work, and leisure.

Design/methodology/approach

Three strands of Christian personalism emerged in twentieth‐century Europe: in Paris, Munich, and Lublin. The author's comments derive from the Lublin strand.

Findings

Mainstream economics regards consumption as satisfying human material wants. Need is disregarded except when poverty is addressed. Personalist economics insists that there are needs of the human spirit which are addressed through consumption. Personalist economics views work as having two effects. First, by producing goods and services it provides income to purchase those goods and services. Second, it provides opportunities to associate with others in the workplace, and to apply creative talents and energies. Mainstream economics regards the first but not the second as within the domain of the discipline. Mainstream economics defines leisure negatively as time spent not working. Personalist economics sees it positively as an activity crucial to personal development.

Originality/value

The reader is asked to consider two questions. Will economic theory continue to be constructed on an economic agent who is represented by the passive and predictable homo economicus of mainstream economics that is based on the individualism of the seventeenth‐to‐eighteenth century enlightenment? Or, will it turn to the active and unpredictable acting person of personalist economics based on a personalism that emerged in the twentieth century?

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

A.H. Walle

Notes that the New Testament provides a classic case of international marketing strategies in conflict, as well as clues to modern international management. Looks at the…

Abstract

Notes that the New Testament provides a classic case of international marketing strategies in conflict, as well as clues to modern international management. Looks at the development of the organization left behind by Jesus Christ in terms of characters such as Peter and Saul and factors such as ethnic niching and the rise of the organization as a multinational. Considers historical events from the New Testament in terms of modern management thinking and concludes that the analogy is helpful in determining modern international management strategy.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Marketing should draw lessons from the world‐wide success of Christianity, which is seen as an international marketing achievement based on local knowledge and adjustment…

Abstract

Marketing should draw lessons from the world‐wide success of Christianity, which is seen as an international marketing achievement based on local knowledge and adjustment to domestic target markets. The relevance of Paul's localised approach to international marketing strategy is highlighted by an examination of the factors which led to his success in this field. Applying contemporary business concepts to the rival launches of Mithraism and Christianity shows the deficiencies of both globalisation and the attempt to appeal to a circumscribed target market.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1981

Charles C. Manz and Henry P. Sims

This paper explores the ethical issues associated with using behavioral management techniques in organizations. First, criticisms of behavioral management are enumerated…

Abstract

This paper explores the ethical issues associated with using behavioral management techniques in organizations. First, criticisms of behavioral management are enumerated. Then, a response is developed for each of the criticisms. A model is proposed which recommends an open/positive system of behavioral management in order to optimize both organizational effectiveness and individual freedom and dignity. Finally, an alternative to external control, employee self‐management, is proposed and explored as a further system of managerial control.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Tom Kilcourse

Working as a consultant in the field of team development, I frequently find myself at odds with people who have different perceptions about the nature of the work. This…

Abstract

Working as a consultant in the field of team development, I frequently find myself at odds with people who have different perceptions about the nature of the work. This confusion was actually expressed in print when in 1980, following the publication of my article on team problem diagnosis, another consultant wrote of his “simpler” method. This turned out to be the “LIFO” system. Again, similar misunderstanding arose in 1982, within a large client organisation in the public sector. The client had undergone major reorganisation, and it had been decided to create an internal consultancy role, a central function of which was to be team development. I was engaged to train those appointed to the role, with emphasis on the skills required by internal consultants. It came as some surprise therefore to be told during a seminar with some of the organisation's directors, that “team building” had recently been conducted in the area concerned. I had not yet trained the internal consultants. It emerged of course that their “team building” and my “team development” were entirely different processes. Impatient to “get things moving”, the organisation had initiated a programme of “team‐building” activity based on packaged exercises, mainly concerned with the analysis of management style.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Book part
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Mark Carpenter

This article is a broad reflection on some of the most common forms of artistic creation, including music, literature and cinema: – a reflection on how (and why) they may…

Abstract

This article is a broad reflection on some of the most common forms of artistic creation, including music, literature and cinema: – a reflection on how (and why) they may reach us and how they may be used or created effectively.

Details

Art in Diverse Social Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-897-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Paul Pence and Kris Lunderman

Describes the “Journey to Excellence” (JTE) empowermentprogram at Advanced Micro Devices (AMD). Emphasizes the role of twolower level managers in promoting its progress…

Abstract

Describes the “Journey to Excellence” (JTE) empowerment program at Advanced Micro Devices (AMD). Emphasizes the role of two lower level managers in promoting its progress. Shows how factors such as team skills and problem‐solving training, efforts to bring supervisory and engineering functions to production worker level, and support from higher level executives led to the success of the program.

Details

Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

Keywords

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