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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Judith Plomp, Maria Tims, Jos Akkermans, Svetlana N. Khapova, Paul G.W. Jansen and Arnold B. Bakker

The purpose of this paper is to bring together job design and career theory in the examination of how proactive employees optimize their well-being (i.e. job satisfaction…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring together job design and career theory in the examination of how proactive employees optimize their well-being (i.e. job satisfaction and perceived health) through job crafting and career competencies. This study offers an integrated account of the pathway from proactive personality to well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by a cross-sectional self-report survey study among 574 employees working in various organizations.

Findings

The results of structural equation modeling analyses supported the proposed double mediation model: job crafting and career competencies both mediated the positive relationship between proactive personality and well-being. The findings suggest that proactive employees can enhance their well-being both through proactive job redesign and the development of career-related skills and abilities.

Research limitations/implications

This study precludes causal explanations. Future research should further investigate the role of employee proactivity related to contemporary work topics, including temporary contracts and self-employment.

Practical implications

Managers and HR practitioners can optimize employee well-being by focusing on HR policies related to job redesign, as well as investing in training and development of career competencies.

Originality/value

This paper integrates two research domains by exploring how proactive employees take a proactive stance toward their job as well as their career, and investigates how this proactive approach contributes to their well-being. In addition, the authors demonstrated a link between the development of career competencies and employee health.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2016

P. Matthijs Bal and Paul G. W. Jansen

As demographic changes impact the workplace, governments, organizations, and workers are looking for ways to sustain optimal working lives at higher ages. Workplace…

Abstract

As demographic changes impact the workplace, governments, organizations, and workers are looking for ways to sustain optimal working lives at higher ages. Workplace flexibility has been introduced as a potential way workers can have more satisfying working lives until their retirement ages. This chapter presents a critical review of the literature on workplace flexibility across the lifespan. It discusses how flexibility has been conceptualized across different disciplines, and postulates a definition that captures the joint roles of employer and employee in negotiating workplace flexibility that contributes to both employee and organization benefits. Moreover, it reviews how flexibility has been theorized and investigated in relation to older workers. The chapter ends with a future research agenda for advancing understanding of how workplace flexibility may enhance working experiences of older workers, and in particular focuses on the critical investigation of uses of flexibility in relation to older workers.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-263-7

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2017

Dagmar Daubner-Siva, Claartje J. Vinkenburg and Paul G.W. Jansen

The purpose of this paper is to adopt a paradox lens for dovetailing the human resource management sub-domains of talent management (TM) and diversity management (DM), in…

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1070

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to adopt a paradox lens for dovetailing the human resource management sub-domains of talent management (TM) and diversity management (DM), in the attempt to create closer alignment between the two.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review paradox theory, TM and DM literatures and formulate a paradox that becomes apparent when considering TM and DM simultaneously.

Findings

The authors coin this tension as the “exclusion-inclusion paradox,” highlighting that TM and DM reflect contradictory, yet interrelated principles: organizations promote exclusion through a TM architecture that focuses on the identification and development of a few selected employees, while simultaneously, organizations promote inclusion, in the attempt to minimize existing inequalities for traditionally marginalized groups.

Practical implications

Once uncovered, the exclusion-inclusion paradox enables organizational actors to make choices on whether to respond actively or defensively to the paradox. The authors argue for active responses in order to work through the paradox.

Originality/value

This is the first paper adopting a paradox lens in order to interweave the DM literature with TM literature in the attempt to explain how DM and TM constitute contradicting yet interrelated principles.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Jos Akkermans, Annet H. de Lange, Beatrice I.J.M. van der Heijden, Dorien T.A.M. Kooij, Paul G.W. Jansen and Josje S.E. Dikkers

The aging workforce is becoming an increasingly important topic in today’s labor market. However, most scientific research and organizational policies focus on…

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2466

Abstract

Purpose

The aging workforce is becoming an increasingly important topic in today’s labor market. However, most scientific research and organizational policies focus on chronological age as the main determinant of successful aging. Based on life span developmental theories – primarily socioemotional selectivity theory and motivational theory of life span development – the purpose of this paper is to test the added value of using subjective age – in terms of remaining opportunities and remaining time – over and above chronological age in their associations with motivation at work and motivation to work.

Design/methodology/approach

Workers from five different divisions throughout the Netherlands (n=186) from a taxi company participated in the survey study.

Findings

The results from the regression analyses and structural equation modeling analyses support the hypotheses: when subjective age was included in the models, chronological age was virtually unrelated to workers’ intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and motivation to continue to work for one’s organization. Moreover, subjective age was strongly related to work motivation. Specifically, workers who perceived many remaining opportunities were more intrinsically and extrinsically motivated, and those who perceived a lot of remaining time were more motivated across the board.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that subjective age is an important concept to include in studies focussing on successful aging, thereby contributing to life span developmental theories. Further implications for research and practice are discussed.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

P. Matthijs Bal, Dan S. Chiaburu and Paul G.W. Jansen

The aim of this paper is to investigate how social exchanges modify the relationship between psychological contract breach and work performance. It aims to present two…

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10967

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate how social exchanges modify the relationship between psychological contract breach and work performance. It aims to present two concurrent hypotheses, based on theoretical interaction effects of social exchanges (conceptualized as social exchange relationships, POS, and trust).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of 266 employees in a service sector company in the USA. Regression analysis was used to explore the moderating effects of social exchanges on the relationships between psychological contract breach and work performance (operationalized as in‐role behaviors and organizational citizenship behaviors).

Findings

It was found that the negative relationship between psychological contract breach and work performance was moderated by social exchanges, such that the relationship was stronger for employees with high social exchange relationship, perceived organizational support, and trust.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected cross‐sectionally, and thus causal inferences have to be made with caution. Moreover, the data were collected from a single source. The study shows that the relations between contract breach and outcomes are moderated by the existing relationship between employee and organization.

Practical implications

Although organizations may invest in long‐term relationships with their employees, psychological contract breaches have a profound impact on work performance. Therefore, organizations should diminish perceptions of contract breach; for instance by providing realistic expectations.

Originality/value

The paper provides new theoretical insights on how social exchange can have two distinct effects on the breach‐outcomes relations. It shows that social exchanges moderate the relations between contract breach and work performance.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Evgenia I. Lysova, Konstantin Korotov, Svetlana N. Khapova and Paul G. W. Jansen

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a growing body of literature on the role of family in managers’ career decision making. Specifically, the authors offer an…

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2206

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a growing body of literature on the role of family in managers’ career decision making. Specifically, the authors offer an empirical elaboration on a recently proposed concept of the “family-relatedness of work decisions” (FRWD) by illuminating the role of the spouse in managers’ career sensemaking.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 88 managers who were in the final stage of their EMBA program took part in the study. The data were gathered through a personal career inventory.

Findings

The findings revealed that next to family-career salience and parent role identification, spouses also play an important role in shaping managers’ family-related career sensemaking.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine the supportive role of spouses in contexts other than that of an international EMBA. Moreover, researchers should examine the role of managers’ boundary management styles in shaping the degree of their family-related career sensemaking.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that when designing and implementing developmental initiatives, organizations should consider that managers’ decisions about their next career steps may be guided by family-related concerns, and the spouse may play a specific role.

Originality/value

This paper offers the first empirical exploration and a refinement of the nascent theory of the “FRWD.” It also introduces a new construct into the theory – spousal career support – that opens new avenues for future research.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Josje S.E. Dikkers, Paul G.W. Jansen, Annet H. de Lange, Claartje J. Vinkenburg and Dorien Kooij

This paper sets out to examine proactive personality in relation to job demands, job resources and engagement.

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5228

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to examine proactive personality in relation to job demands, job resources and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study employed a two‐wave complete panel study among 794 Dutch government employees. Based upon the Job Demands‐Resources (JD‐R) model, previous studies, job crafting theories, and Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, hypotheses on the associations of proactive personality with job demands, resources, and engagement were developed.

Findings

Analyses revealed that proactive personality was associated with an increase in engagement 18 months later. Moreover, proactive employees perceiving high social support reported the highest levels of engagement over time.

Research limitations/implications

A first shortcoming is that proactive personality was only measured at one point in time, which restricted the testing of causal relationships of proactive personality with engagement. Second, this study only measured engagement as outcome measure and third variables may have affected the associations of proactive personality with job demands and resources and engagement. Third, only small effect sizes of proactive personality (and job demands and resources) on engagement over time were found. With regard to theoretical implications, this study suggests a refinement of the JD‐R model by perceiving proactive personality as a personal resource which coincides with job resources such as social support and/or is triggered by (low) external job demands in increasing engagement.

Practical implications

Since this study's findings suggest that proactive personality is a personal resource with beneficial effects on employees' levels of work‐related engagement, employers are advised to promote the behavior expressed by proactive employees. When employees are under challenged due to a low level of quantitative job demands or when they want to optimize their work environment in case of high job demands, proactive personality may have a positive impact on their engagement over time, in particular when combined with high levels of support from their colleagues and supervisor.

Originality/value

This study's value consists of its innovative effort to relate proactive personality to engagement 18 months later. In addition, the longitudinal design of this study made it possible to examine the associations of proactive personality, job demands and resources with engagement over time.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Chen Fleisher, Svetlana N. Khapova and Paul G.W. Jansen

This paper examines the effects of the development of employees’ career competencies (knowing-why, knowing-how, and knowing-whom) on the employing organization and…

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3738

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the effects of the development of employees’ career competencies (knowing-why, knowing-how, and knowing-whom) on the employing organization and assesses the role of career satisfaction in this relationship. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to research on the consequences of employees’ boundaryless careers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involves a two-wave quantitative investigation of alumni of a large public university in the Netherlands.

Findings

The results suggest that by investing in the development of their career competencies, employees contribute to organizational culture, capabilities, and connections. However, these contributions depend on employees’ level of perceived career satisfaction. If employees are satisfied with their careers, they contribute more to their organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Further longitudinal research, strengthened by an additional, third wave of data collection, is needed to replicate the present findings.

Practical implications

The study highlights the importance of employees’ career development for organizations.

Originality/value

This study is the first empirical investigation of the link between the development of employees’ career competencies and employees’ contributions to their employers and one of a few studies that examines career satisfaction as a moderating variable.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Paul G.W. Jansen, Mandy E.G. van der Velde and Inge A. Telting

The present longitudinal study examines the effect of 105 different human resource practices, grouped into four domains (staffing, human resource development, hygiene…

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1991

Abstract

The present longitudinal study examines the effect of 105 different human resource practices, grouped into four domains (staffing, human resource development, hygiene factors, supportive climate) on trends in the increase or decrease of the number of men and women working at different hierarchical levels. In addition to the four HR domains, the effect of initial gender ratio at the start of the program was analyzed. Results show that intitial gender ratio had the largest effect on the advancement of men and women. Surprisingly, both women and men benefited from a larger female gender ratio in the highest job levels. If the effect of gender ratio is omitted, it appears that the advancement of men and women in the highest job levels is negatively affected by hygiene practices and not influenced by staffing, development or supportive practices.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Evgenia I. Lysova, Julia Richardson, Svetlana N. Khapova and Paul G. W. Jansen

– The purpose of this paper is to explore how career identity informs employees’ willingness to engage in organizational change initiatives.

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2702

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how career identity informs employees’ willingness to engage in organizational change initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the findings of a qualitative case study exploring the experiences of 29 employees involved in a planned “bottom-up” organizational change initiative. At the time of the study, all interviewees were employed in a Dutch non-profit organization.

Findings

Drawing on protean career theory and the literature on other-oriented work values, we show that career identity informs both how employees make sense of the respective organizational change and their willingness to engage in it. The authors found that proactive career behavior and a focus on other-oriented work values inform higher levels of employees’ engagement in the change, while passive career behavior and self-centered work values inform employees’ lower levels of involvement in the change initiative. Based on the findings, the authors conclude this paper with a conceptual model which captures the cyclical relationship between career identity and employees’ willingness to engage in organizational change initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should consider both the individual characteristics of employees involved in change initiatives and content or contextual factors when exploring willingness to engage with change.

Practical implications

Organizational change consultants and managers need to be aware of the influence of career identity on employees’ willingness to engage in organizational change and use this information during the implementation of change initiatives.

Originality/value

The paper explores employees’ willingness to engage with organizational change initiatives through the lens of career identity.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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