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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Paul F. Burke, Christine Eckert and Stacey Davis

This paper aims to quantify the relative importance of reasons used to explain consumers’ selection and rejection of ethical products, accounting for differences in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to quantify the relative importance of reasons used to explain consumers’ selection and rejection of ethical products, accounting for differences in ethical orientations across consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviewing previous literature and drawing on in-depth interviews, a taxonomy of reasons for and against ethical purchasing is developed. An online survey incorporating best–worst scaling (BWS) determines which reasons feature more in shaping ethical consumerism. Cluster analysis and multinomial regression are used to identify and profile segments.

Findings

Positively orientated consumers (42 per cent of respondents) purchase ethical products more so because of reasons relating to impact, health, personal relevance, and quality. Negatively orientated consumers (34 per cent of respondents) reject ethical alternatives based on reasons relating to indifference, expense, confusion and scepticism. A third segment is ambivalent in their behaviour and reasoning; they perceive ethical purchasing to be effective and relevant, but are confused and sceptical under what conditions this can occur.

Research limitations/implications

Preferences were elicited using an online survey rather than using real market data. Though the task instructions and methods used attempted to minimise social-desirability bias, the experiment might still be subject to its effects.

Practical implications

Competitive positioning strategies can be better designed knowing which barriers to ethical purchasing are more relevant. The paper challenges the benefits in altruistic-based positioning and outlines shortcomings in communication about ethical products, including those relating to product labelling.

Social implications

Through their purchase behaviours across a number of categories, ethical consumers aim to minimise the harm and exploitation of humans, animals and the natural environment. This research provides insights into the potential reasons why the uptake of ethical products is not being achieved and how it can be addressed to make improvements in making this movement more mainstream.

Originality/value

This research examines an extensive list of reasons for and against ethical purchasing used by a general population of consumers. By forcing respondents to make trade-offs, this is the first study quantifying the relative importance of reasons utilised by consumers. It also highlights the value in using cluster analysis on best–worst scores to identify underlying segments.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2017

Larry D. Compeau

To examine bad credit experiences in the context of identity to understand the entanglement between bad credit and the deformation of identity.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine bad credit experiences in the context of identity to understand the entanglement between bad credit and the deformation of identity.

Methodology/approach

A qualitative method using depth interviews and hermeneutical analysis.

Findings

Bad credit is a major life event and plays a critical role in identity. By restricting or eliminating identity construction and maintenance through consumption, identities are deformed. Consumer identities are deformed as they are consumed by the identity deformation process as normal patterns of consumption that have built and supported their identities are disrupted and demolished. Bad credit is overwhelmingly consumptive of consumers – it consumes their time, energy, patience, lifestyle, relationships, social connections, and perhaps most importantly, it consumes their identity as it deforms who they are.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers need to examine more closely not just the creation and maintenance of identity, but also how identity is deformed and deconstructed through consumption experiences that can no longer be enjoyed.

Social implications

Government agencies may want to reexamine policies toward the granting of credit to reduce the incidence of loading up consumers with credit they are not able to pay for. The deformation of identity may result in anti-social behavior, although our study does not address this directly.

Originality/value

This study is different from previous work in several ways. We focus on identity deformation due to bad credit. By analyzing a crisis response that transcends the specific impetus of bad credit, we extend identity theory by developing an insight into “identities-in-crisis.” We also provide a theoretical framework and explore how consumers’ identities are deformed and renegotiated.

Details

Qualitative Consumer Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-491-0

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2015

Allan H. Church, Christopher T. Rotolo, Alyson Margulies, Matthew J. Del Giudice, Nicole M. Ginther, Rebecca Levine, Jennifer Novakoske and Michael D. Tuller

Organization development is focused on implementing a planned process of positive humanistic change in organizations through the use of social science theory, action…

Abstract

Organization development is focused on implementing a planned process of positive humanistic change in organizations through the use of social science theory, action research, and data-based feedback methods. The role of personality in that change process, however, has historically been ignored or relegated to a limited set of interventions. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a conceptual overview of the linkages between personality and OD, discuss the current state of personality in the field including key trends in talent management, and offer a new multi-level framework for conceptualizing applications of personality for different types of OD efforts. The chapter concludes with implications for research and practice.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Elisabeth Tamedly Lenches

The encyclical Centesimus Annus was published by Pope JohnPaul II in commemoration of Rerum Novarum, written 100 years agoby Leo XIII. That encyclical initiated a century…

Abstract

The encyclical Centesimus Annus was published by Pope John Paul II in commemoration of Rerum Novarum, written 100 years ago by Leo XIII. That encyclical initiated a century of Catholic social teaching consisting, by now, of six encyclicals. Together, they are intended to represent a unified system of thought, the Church′s social vision. Its basic themes all centre on the God‐ordained dignity of man. The Pope calls for a modified, “corrected” capitalism, a “Society of free work, of enterprise and of participation”. The economic activities of man are to be reoriented towards the common good, with the ultimate goal of eradicating poverty, exploitation, and alienation. Rejects the economic proposals of the Pope as lacking of substance and internal consistency. Its assumption that man can enjoy all the advantages of free markets while also correcting for their less‐desirable effects at will reveals that, despite some modifications, Catholic social thought is still inspired by what has been termed the “unconstrained” vision.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2017

Tripp Driskell, James E. Driskell and Eduardo Salas

The reliance on teams in today’s work environment underscores the importance of understanding how teams function. To better understand teams, one must be able to measure…

Abstract

Purpose

The reliance on teams in today’s work environment underscores the importance of understanding how teams function. To better understand teams, one must be able to measure team dynamics or interaction. The purpose of this chapter is to outline an unobtrusive approach to measuring team dynamics from verbal communications.

Methodology

The basic premise of this approach is that the words we use provide insight into how we feel and think at any given time. The methodology described in this chapter employs a lexical analytic approach to examining team dynamics. To best accomplish this, we first identify the principal features or dimensions of teamwork and then we propose lexical measures that may map to these processes.

Practical implications

This approach can be employed to track team functioning over time “at a distance” without interrupting task performance.

Originality

This chapter describes an approach to measuring relevant teamwork dimensions through verbal content. This approach has the potential to give us direct, unobtrusive insight into the emotional and cognitive states of teams. It is original in its examination of how team dynamics can be indexed in speech.

Details

Team Dynamics Over Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-403-7

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Ronald J. Burke, Fay Oberklaid and Zena Burgess

This study examined the relationship of female and male psychologists perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and their work…

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of female and male psychologists perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and their work experiences, work and non‐work satisfactions, and psychological well‐being. Data were collected from 458 Australian psychologists using anonymous questionnaires. Psychologists reporting organizational values more supportive of work‐personal life balance also reported greater job and career satisfaction, less work stress, less intention to quit, greater family satisfaction, fewer psychosomatic symptoms, and more positive emotional well‐being. Interestingly, perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance were unrelated to hours and extra‐hours worked and job involvement.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

Current issues of Publishers' Weekly are reporting serious shortages of paper, binders board, cloth, and other essential book manufacturing materials. Let us assure you…

Abstract

Current issues of Publishers' Weekly are reporting serious shortages of paper, binders board, cloth, and other essential book manufacturing materials. Let us assure you these shortages are very real and quite severe.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Ronald J. Burke

The last ten years has demonstrated increased attention to women in management research (Davidson & Burke, 1994; Fagenson, 1993; Sekaran & Leong, 1992). We have a good…

Abstract

The last ten years has demonstrated increased attention to women in management research (Davidson & Burke, 1994; Fagenson, 1993; Sekaran & Leong, 1992). We have a good understanding of the barriers women face as they pursue careers in medium and large organizations (Morrison, 1992; Auster, 1993). An increasing number of organizations have realized that the full utilization and development of the talents of all employees has become a business imperative (Schwartz, 1992). Supporting the career aspirations of women is not just the right thing to do; it is the smart thing to do if organizations are to remain productive and competitive in an increasingly demanding market place (Totta & Burke, 1995).

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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