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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Emanuele Felice Osimo, Lydia Mariner and Paul Wilkinson

In previous research, personality and exposure to psychiatry were independently shown to shape medical students attitudes towards psychiatry (ATP). This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

In previous research, personality and exposure to psychiatry were independently shown to shape medical students attitudes towards psychiatry (ATP). This paper aims to investigate the role of psychiatry placements and personality types on medical student attitudes towards psychiatry (ATP).

Design/methodology/approach

All medical students from four consecutive years at Cambridge University, UK were invited to take part in an online questionnaire including the ATP-30 Questionnaire and The Big Five Factor personality Inventory (BFI).

Findings

Students who had completed their psychiatry placement had more positive ATP than students who had not (t = −3.24, adjusted p = 0.004). However, this was not reflected in an increased self-reported likelihood of choosing psychiatry as a career (t = 0.28, adjusted p = 0.78). Higher agreeable personality scores were associated with both a higher willingness to take up psychiatry as a career (linear model estimate 0.06; p = 0.03), and more positive ATP (linear model estimate 0.14; p < 0.0001).

Originality/value

This work seems to confirm that exposure to psychiatry improves attitudes towards psychiatry. Agreeable personality traits were also associated with a higher willingness to take up psychiatry postgraduate training. These findings might help shape future campaigns to improve the profile of psychiatry training. Future research on this topic is needed to address whether improved ATP among medical students can longitudinally improve recruitment into post-graduate psychiatry training.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

SEBASTIAN MACMILLAN, JOHN STEELE, PAUL KIRBY, ROBIN SPENCE and SIMON AUSTIN

This paper reports the outcome of a 2‐year research project that set out to provide a process map of the concept stage of building projects. From a literature review…

Abstract

This paper reports the outcome of a 2‐year research project that set out to provide a process map of the concept stage of building projects. From a literature review, comparison of current process maps, and through interviews and case study analyses, a tentative new framework for the concept stage was developed and tested. It comprises 12 activities in five phases. The framework formed the basis of a graphical method used to plot the activities of design teams in a series of workshops. This graphical method illustrates design iteration in a way which we believe has not been undertaken before, and the patterns it reveals are intuitively understood by design team members themselves, helping them reflect on their own design process. We have also constructed a prototype internet‐based decision support tool for the concept stage of design. This is intended to be inherently flexible and supportive of non‐linear routes through concept design, while also offering a structured approach, design tools to broaden the solution space or evaluate competing options, team management advice, and the recording of decision making. Initial testing of this tool showed it to be well‐received, although it was criticized for focusing too much on the gates between activities and too little on the issues and decisions within each activity.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Deborah J. Morris, Elanor Lucy Webb, Lowri Foster-Davies, Paul M. Wallang, David Gibbs, Peter D. McAllister and Farshad Shaddel

Ethical concerns about the use of the Mental Health Act (MHA) have led to calls for developmental disorders to be removed from the list of mental disorders for which…

Abstract

Purpose

Ethical concerns about the use of the Mental Health Act (MHA) have led to calls for developmental disorders to be removed from the list of mental disorders for which individuals can be detained. In parallel, there are long-standing concerns of ethnic disparity in the application of the MHA. Nonetheless, the impact of the intersections of developmental disorder diagnosis, adolescence and ethnicity on the application of the MHA is unknown. This study aims to explore ethnic differences in MHA sections and the factors accounting for this, in an adolescent inpatient developmental disorder service.

Design/methodology/approach

File reviews were conducted to explore differences in MHA status, as well as demographic, clinical and risk factors that may account for this, between 39 white British and ethnic minority adolescents detained to a specialist inpatient developmental disorder service.

Findings

Consistent with adult literature, adolescents of an ethnic minority were overrepresented in the sample and were significantly more likely to be detained on Part III or “forensic” sections of the MHA than White British counterparts, with five times greater risk. Analyses revealed no significant differences between ethnic minority and white British participants on demographic variables, clinical needs, risk behaviours, risk measures nor application of restrictive practices and safeguarding procedures.

Practical implications

National audits exploring patterns of detention under the MHA across adolescent developmental disorder populations need to include analysis of intersections to ensure that the MHA is used as a means of last resort and in an equitable manner.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first comprehensive exploration of the impact of ethnicity on detention patterns in ethnic minority and White British populations.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Paul Cambridge

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Paul Cambridge

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Paul Cambridge and Steven Carnaby

This paper identifies considerations for managing the risks of abuse during intimate and personal care for people with learning disabilities and complex needs. Drawing on…

Abstract

This paper identifies considerations for managing the risks of abuse during intimate and personal care for people with learning disabilities and complex needs. Drawing on insights gleaned from research involving interviews with staff, policies and procedures in specialist day and residential services, and the development of a staff training resource, the paper identifies a framework for adult protection practice in this critical area of support.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Paul Cambridge

Informed consent, confidentiality, disclosure, policy and the wider consequences of HIV testing are issues explored in this paper concerning a man with learning…

150

Abstract

Informed consent, confidentiality, disclosure, policy and the wider consequences of HIV testing are issues explored in this paper concerning a man with learning disabilities who tested positive for HIV. The events and outcomes are summarised, with lessons identified for policy and practice in HIV risk management and adult protection in services for people with learning disabilities.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Paul Cambridge

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Paul Cambridge and Tessa Parkes

This paper argues for a case management rationale in adult protection management and practice, drawing insights from a series of linked training initiatives and an…

Abstract

This paper argues for a case management rationale in adult protection management and practice, drawing insights from a series of linked training initiatives and an evaluation of the role of the specialist adult protection co‐ordinator. An explicit case managed approach contrasts with much current practice for adult protection, where responsibilities often vary widely within, between and across agencies and professional and worker roles.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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