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1 – 10 of 695
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Paul Boyle, Tom Cooke, Keith Halfacree and Darren Smith

Presents the findings of a study of long distance migrations for employment opportunities in both the US and the UK. Compares the cross‐national differences between the…

Abstract

Presents the findings of a study of long distance migrations for employment opportunities in both the US and the UK. Compares the cross‐national differences between the two countries and tries to investigate the effects of the relative resources of the partner in their subsequent search for employment. Attempts to discover any gender differences based upon occupational status. Evaluates the similarity and differences between the countries.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Vernon Gayle, Paul Boyle, Robin Flowerdew and Andrew Cullis

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between family migration (i.e. couples with or without children moving home) and social stratification in Britain…

1285

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between family migration (i.e. couples with or without children moving home) and social stratification in Britain. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of family migration on social stratification using contemporary large‐scale nationally representative data.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigates data from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). This is a nationally representative large‐scale longitudinal dataset which tracks a panel of British households and collects interview data annually.

Findings

The paper found a weak relationship between moving house and employment status. Long‐distance migration had a different effect for males and females when prior employment was considered. There was not relationship between migration and female occupational position, but a small effect for men when the move was for reasons related to their own employment. Generally, migration had a positive effect on the family's social class position.

Practical implications

The paper illustrates that longitudinal data are highly beneficial for analyses of family migration as they provide a temporal location for the move.

Originality/value

This is an original set of analyses of contemporary large‐scale nationally representative longitudinal data.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 28 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

65

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

73

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Robert M. Blackburn

Introduces the different types of inequality. Argues the distinction between inequality and differences. Asks if social inequality is important or a mistaken ideal…

2263

Abstract

Introduces the different types of inequality. Argues the distinction between inequality and differences. Asks if social inequality is important or a mistaken ideal? Briefly looks at the different forms inequality takes.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

84

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2009

Margaret Woods, Christopher Humphrey, Kevin Dowd and Yu‐Lin Liu

The purpose of this paper is to review the way in which auditing issues have been raised and addressed during the credit crunch and developing global financial crisis.

4367

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the way in which auditing issues have been raised and addressed during the credit crunch and developing global financial crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis is based on a review of the academic auditing literature, regulatory and audit reports, together with papers from the financial press.

Findings

After highlighting the relative lack of media attention devoted to the external auditing function in the light of major corporate collapses, the paper considers what, contrastingly, is an active and ongoing series of responses to the current crisis on the part of auditing firms and the profession more generally. Through such analysis the paper explores a number of implications of the credit crunch for both auditing practice and research.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is constrained in part by the rapidly unfolding nature of events, with important policy developments arising almost on a daily basis. The paper draws primarily on events up to the beginning of October 2008.

Practical implications

The paper has important messages for audit practice and research, including the technical capacities of external audits in the banking sector, the contributions of standard setting bodies and regulatory oversight, and the scope for enhanced dialogue between such parties and audit researchers.

Originality/value

The paper serves both to focus and stimulate analysis of the credit crunch on the audit profession. It demonstrates the complexity of contemporary practice and highlights the importance, especially from an educational perspective, of developing understanding of banking audit practice and associated regulatory interactions – including the presented possibilities both for research and enhanced academic‐practitioner dialogue.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

165

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Lee‐Ing Tong, K.S. Chen and H.T. Chen

The electronics industry has heavily prioritized enhancing the quality, lifetime and conforming rate (conforming to specifications) of electronic components. Various…

1947

Abstract

The electronics industry has heavily prioritized enhancing the quality, lifetime and conforming rate (conforming to specifications) of electronic components. Various methods have been developed for assessing quality performance. In practice, process capability indices (PCIs) are used as a means of measuring process potential and performance. Moreover, most PCIs have been developed or investigated under the assumption that electronic components have a lifetime with a normal distribution. However, PCIs for non‐normal distributions have seldom been discussed. Nevertheless, the lifetime of electronic components generally may possess an exponential, gamma or Weibull distribution and so forth. Under an exponential distribution, some properties of the PCIs and their estimators differ from those in a normal distribution. To utilize the PCIs more reasonably and accurately in assessing the lifetime performance of electronic components, this study constructs a uniformly minimum variance unbiased (UMVU) estimator of their lifetime performance index under an exponential distribution. The UMVU estimator of the lifetime performance index is then utilized to develop the hypothesis testing procedure. The purchasers can then employ the testing procedure to determine whether the lifetime of the electronic components adheres to the required level. Manufacturers can also utilize this procedure to enhance process capability.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Georgios Patsiaouras

This study aims to provide a historical understanding of conspicuous consumption phenomena in the context of the UK, between 1945 and 2000. It considers how status-driven…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a historical understanding of conspicuous consumption phenomena in the context of the UK, between 1945 and 2000. It considers how status-driven consumption has been shaped by economic, technological and cultural factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a periodization scheme, concerning two time structures between 1945 and 2000, this paper is based on research stemming from a wide range of data such as academic studies, research articles, narrative history books, past advertisements, novels and biographies. Rich interdisciplinary data from the realms of political economy, sociology, cultural geography and consumption studies have been synthesized so as to provide a marketing-oriented historical outlook on conspicuous consumption phenomena.

Findings

Status-driven consumption in the UK has been heavily influenced by economic policies, cultural changes and public perceptions towards wealth during the second half of the twentieth century. Post-war rationing, youth-driven fashion, free-market economics and technological advances have played a crucial role in forming consumers’ tastes and engagement with ostentatious economic display.

Originality/value

Although the vast majority of marketing studies have approached luxury consumption through a psychological angle, this examination identifies the capacity of historical research to uncover and highlight the interrelationships between socio-economic factors and status-motivated consumption.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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