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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Paul Bocij and Leroy McFarlane

The advent of the internet has led to the new phenomenon of ‘cyberstalking’. This paper examines the extent of this problem. It is argued that all of the estimates…

Abstract

The advent of the internet has led to the new phenomenon of ‘cyberstalking’. This paper examines the extent of this problem. It is argued that all of the estimates commonly cited are flawed because they rely on inaccurate or outdated information or are based on a number of unproven assumptions. Although some estimates suggest that there may be as many as 10 million victims in the United States and Canada alone, available evidence supports a far smaller estimate. It is concluded that additional research is needed to arrive at more accurate and reliable estimates.

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Safer Communities, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Paul Bocij

Although much has been learnt about the psychological and physical harm caused to victims of stalking and cyberstalking, relatively little is known about the impact of…

Abstract

Although much has been learnt about the psychological and physical harm caused to victims of stalking and cyberstalking, relatively little is known about the impact of stalking on social behaviour and relationships. This paper argues that victims of stalking sometimes go on to employ stalking behaviours against others. Although often arising from an instinctive need for self‐protection, such reactive stalking can be defensive or offensive in nature. Those who engage in such behaviour may do so from a need to assert control over their lives, or from fear of further victimisation. In pursuing this argument, a case study is used to illustrate the behaviours described. The case study focuses on the experiences of three stalking victims and describes attempts to victimise the author during his research. The article also discusses some of the implications of reactive stalking for the criminal justice system and the way in which victims receive support.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Paul Bocij, Helen Bocij and Leroy McFarlane

This paper presents the first academic case study of a UK cyberstalking incident that involved an individual known to have harassed at least four victims. The case study…

Abstract

This paper presents the first academic case study of a UK cyberstalking incident that involved an individual known to have harassed at least four victims. The case study describes how the harasser selected victims, his use of technology to gather confidential information about them and his use of multiple personalities as part of the process of harassment. The discussion section of the paper raises a broad range of issues, including whether the case represents a genuine cyberstalking incident, how technology was used to assist the harasser's activities and how the harasser attempted to avoid detection.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Paul Bocij

This paper examines the risks surrounding a growing trend for young people to create personal websites that feature online diaries or live video feeds. These websites…

Abstract

This paper examines the risks surrounding a growing trend for young people to create personal websites that feature online diaries or live video feeds. These websites often chronicle the most intimate parts of their owners' lives in great detail. Unfortunately, a young person may sometimes unintentionally attract the attention of an internet predator visiting the site, for example by publishing unsuitable pictures or through inappropriate self‐disclosure. This risk is increased when a young person has only limited awareness of the basic precautions that should be taken when publishing material to a website or communicating with visitors. However, in a growing number of cases young people are deliberately placing themselves at risk in order to gain a variety of benefits, both emotional and material. The discussion examines the emergence of a ‘wish list’ scene and considers some of the ways in which adults can exploit young people, for example by encouraging them to promote adult services. The paper concludes by offering several potential measures that might be used to reduce risks to young people.

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Safer Communities, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

David Crighton and Graham Towl

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

David Crighton and Graham Towl

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Alan Marlow

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Safer Communities, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Alan Marlow

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Safer Communities, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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