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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Janelle M. Zauha

Browsing rooms are those alluring spaces in the college or university library where the reader may shut out the flood and clamor of information. Here the imagination and personal…

Abstract

Browsing rooms are those alluring spaces in the college or university library where the reader may shut out the flood and clamor of information. Here the imagination and personal interests of the reader are nurtured. Today's browsing rooms are vestiges of the 1920s and 1930s, developed in an era when academic libraries vigorously promoted recreational reading interests of students. As repositories of works chosen from the main collection for their ability to uplift, relax, and stimulate the student reader, the browsing collection in the college library of the 1930s was itself the embodiment of readers' advisory, that Cadillac of public library services.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Paul B. Wiener

102

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Paul B. Wiener and Special Services Librarian

68

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Gregory E. Koster

The ethics of librarianship has become a topic of increasing interest since the mid‐1970s, as a series of scandals beginning with Watergate seemed to show serious weaknesses in…

Abstract

The ethics of librarianship has become a topic of increasing interest since the mid‐1970s, as a series of scandals beginning with Watergate seemed to show serious weaknesses in the ethical standards of lawyers and other professionals.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

P.R. Masani

Presents the scientific methodology from the enlarged cybernetical perspective that recognizes the anisotropy of time, the probabilistic character of natural laws, and the entry…

Abstract

Presents the scientific methodology from the enlarged cybernetical perspective that recognizes the anisotropy of time, the probabilistic character of natural laws, and the entry that the incomplete determinism in Nature opens to the occurrence of innovation, growth, organization, teleology communication, control, contest and freedom. The new tier to the methodological edifice that cybernetics provides stands on the earlier tiers, which go back to the Ionians (c. 500 BC). However, the new insights reveal flaws in the earlier tiers, and their removal strengthens the entire edifice. The new concepts of teleological activity and contest allow the clear demarcation of the military sciences as those whose subject matter is teleological activity involving contest. The paramount question “what ought to be done”, outside the empirical realm, is embraced by the scientific methodology. It also embraces the cognitive sciences that ask how the human mind is able to discover, and how the sequence of discoveries might converge to a true description of reality.

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Kybernetes, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2016

Gabriel Oliva

This chapter explores the ways in which cybernetics influenced the works of F. A. Hayek from the late 1940s onward. It shows that the concept of negative feedback, borrowed from…

Abstract

This chapter explores the ways in which cybernetics influenced the works of F. A. Hayek from the late 1940s onward. It shows that the concept of negative feedback, borrowed from cybernetics, was central to Hayek’s attempt to explain the principle of the emergence of human purposive behavior. Next, the chapter discusses Hayek’s later uses of cybernetic ideas in his works on the spontaneous formation of social orders. Finally, Hayek’s view on the appropriate scope of the use of cybernetics is considered.

Details

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-960-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Leone Montagnini

The paper studies the participation of Gregory Bateson at the Macy Conferences on Cybernetics, that would prove to be a real turning point in his intellectual itinerary.

659

Abstract

Purpose

The paper studies the participation of Gregory Bateson at the Macy Conferences on Cybernetics, that would prove to be a real turning point in his intellectual itinerary.

Design/methodology/approach

It bases itself on more or less known documents and on the newer studies on early cybernetics, focussing in particular on the earliest Macy meetings.

Findings

Being still an anthropologist, Bateson insisted on the importance and lack of theory in social sciences. Arriving at the first Macy meeting, he hoped that the new researches conducted by Norbert Wiener with others would have helped him to clarify the concept of circular causality that he believed to be a very central theoretical notion in social sciences. Indeed, Wiener was strongly sceptical about the inclusion of social sciences in the new cybernetic programs. Nevertheless, Bateson could learn about negative and positive feedback, about how negative feedback was able to explain finality in a non‐metaphysical way, and discovered the specificity of phenomena concerning information. In addition, he became acquainted with Russell's theory of logical types, which resonated in his mind with his ideas about deutero‐learning. Very quickly, his reasoning about circular processes in society began to include also problems of communication and self‐referentiality.

Originality/value

It wants to explain one of the most important moments in Bateson's scientific evolution, emphasizing theoretical problems in social sciences demanding still now a stable clarification.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 36 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

P.R. Masani

In the animal world the presence of entropy necessitates contest. Among the non‐human mammals the contests are overwhelmingly inter‐specific. On the other hand the bulk of human…

Abstract

In the animal world the presence of entropy necessitates contest. Among the non‐human mammals the contests are overwhelmingly inter‐specific. On the other hand the bulk of human contests are intra‐specific. They bring about a dissipation in human systems akin to that brought on by noise in natural systems (“human noise”). Just as the engineering of natural systems hinges on the successful understanding of noise and its filtration, so the successful administration of human systems must hinge on the understanding of human noise and its filtration. In this paper, after demarcating the concepts of communication, teleology, contest and inquiry and their stochastic foundations, we shall (1) show that post‐Weber administrative theory, unlike the more classical, is delinquent in its neglect of human noise, (2) list the lacunae in the prevailing theory, (3) explain the greater efficiency of the administration of warfare in contrast to that of more humane projects, (4) expound the Parkinson maxims on the human noise specific to a Weberian bureaucracy, (5) show how this together with widespread corruption results in ineffective government, and finally, (6) suggest how systems analysts might approach this problem.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Richard A. Hawkins

This paper explores the development of a luxury retail shoe brand in Belle Époque Vienna.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the development of a luxury retail shoe brand in Belle Époque Vienna.

Design/methodology/approach

Footwear retailing and marketing history is a neglected area. Unfortunately, no business records have survived from Robert Schlesinger’s shoe stores. However, it has been possible to reconstruct the history of the development of the Paprika Schlesinger brand from its extensive advertising in the Viennese newspaper, the Neue Freie Presse, with the guidance of the founder’s grandson, Prof Robert A. Shaw, Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, Birkbeck, University of London, England. This case study would not have been possible without the digitization of some major collections of primary sources. In 2014, the European Union’s Europeana digitization initiative launched a new portal via the Library of Europe website which provides access to selected digitized historic newspaper collections in libraries across Europe. The project partners include the Austrian National Library which has digitized full runs of several major historic Austrian newspapers, including the Neue Freie Presse. Other project partners which have digitized historic newspapers which are relevant to this paper are the Landesbibliothek Dr Friedrich Teßmann of Italy’s Südtirol region, the National Library of France and the Berlin State Library. An associate project partner library, the Slovenian National and University Library’s Digital Library of Slovenia, has also digitized relevant historic newspapers. Furthermore, the City of Vienna has digitized a complete set of Vienna city directories as part of its Wienbibliothek Digital project.

Findings

This paper suggests that Robert Schlesinger created one of the first European luxury retail shoe brands.

Originality/value

This is the first academic study of the historical development of the advertising and marketing of a European luxury retail shoe brand.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Leon Feng, B. Paul Gibson and Yi Lin

430

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 32 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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