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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Sarah Rosenbloom, Susan Yount, Kathleen Yost, Debra Hampton, Diane Paul, Amy Abernethy, Paul B. Jacobsen, Karen Syrjala, Jamie Von Roenn and David Cella

Recent guidance from the United States Food and Drug Administration discusses patient-reported outcomes as endpoints in clinical trials (FDA, 2006). Using methods…

Abstract

Recent guidance from the United States Food and Drug Administration discusses patient-reported outcomes as endpoints in clinical trials (FDA, 2006). Using methods consistent with this guidance, we developed symptom indexes for patients with advanced cancer. Input on the most important symptoms was obtained from 533 patients recruited from National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) member institutions and four non-profit social service organizations. Diagnoses included the following 11 primary cancers: bladder, brain, breast, colorectal, head/neck, hepatobiliary/pancreatic, kidney, lung, lymphoma, ovarian and prostate. Physician experts in each of 11 diseases were also surveyed to differentiate symptoms that were predominantly disease-based from those that were predominantly treatment-induced. Results were evaluated alongside previously published indexes for 9 of these 11 advanced cancers that were created based on expert provider surveys, also at NCCN institutions (Cella et al., 2003). The final results are 11 symptom indexes that reflect the highest priorities of people affected by these 11 advanced cancers and the experienced perspective of the people who provide their medical treatment. Beyond the clinical value of such indexes, they may also contribute significantly to satisfying regulatory requirements for a standardized tool to evaluate drug efficacy with respect to symptomatology.

Details

The Value of Innovation: Impact on Health, Life Quality, Safety, and Regulatory Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-551-2

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1980

BRENT POPPENHAGEN, JULIAN MINGUS and JOSEPH ROGUS

Differences among elementary, junior high, and senior high school principals' perceptions of their administrative task competence; involvement with central office;…

Abstract

Differences among elementary, junior high, and senior high school principals' perceptions of their administrative task competence; involvement with central office; autonomy; job satisfaction; and length of work week were investigated in relation to social forces confronting the principalship and characteristics of traditional principal preparation programs. Questionnaires mailed to a random sample of 450 principals in rural, urban, and suburban districts yielded a 64 per cent return. All principals perceived themselves competent in administrative tasks. However, suburban principals were more involved with central office and experienced greater autonomy than urban principals. Urban principals worked similar hours and were uniformly satisfied unlike suburban principals who varied significantly in level of satisfaction and hours worked. Revisions in principal preparation programs were mandated.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Abstract

Details

The Value of Innovation: Impact on Health, Life Quality, Safety, and Regulatory Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-551-2

Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Panigkaq Agatha John-Shields

The primary purpose of this chapter is to portray the transformative, educational journey of an Indigenous educator. Using an Indigenous way of learning in connection with…

Abstract

The primary purpose of this chapter is to portray the transformative, educational journey of an Indigenous educator. Using an Indigenous way of learning in connection with the Yup’ik teachings of kenka/love and ellangeq/awareness the author describes the clashes and challenges that Western education brings about as it conflicts with Indigenous epistemologies. She shares how she transformed her way of learning and teaching in higher education through continuous reflection and transformation by using her own Indigenous ways of knowing. She goes on to show how these ways of knowing can transform higher education classrooms into culturally sustaining and revitalizing spaces.

Details

Culturally Sustaining and Revitalizing Pedagogies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-261-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2022

Bindiya Dutt

The chapter aims to empirically explore trends and issues concerning Indian wellness services being taken internationally for commercial use by wellness service providers…

Abstract

The chapter aims to empirically explore trends and issues concerning Indian wellness services being taken internationally for commercial use by wellness service providers and tourists. The text also highlights how their authenticity gets compromised in place of profitability. The enquiry is approached through a conceptual framework of wellness tourism and subsequent tourism concerns. While scholars have recently turned their attention to tourism challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, the perspective of digitalization within tourism can help to nuance this area of concern. Some recommendations for the Indian wellness tourism sector include digital solutions, screen-induced tourism, measures towards tourists' safety, regulations concerning certifications and targeting new client segments. Furthermore, raising greater awareness about the philosophical backdrop of Indian wellness services amongst international tourists would contribute to practice and theory while resurrecting the wellness tourism industry in India.

Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Abstract

Details

Intellectual Capital and Public Sector Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-169-4

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Abstract

Details

Authenticity & Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-817-6

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Harshita Harshita, Shveta Singh and Surendra S. Yadav

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the monthly seasonality in the Indian stock market after taking into consideration the market features of leptokurtosis…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the monthly seasonality in the Indian stock market after taking into consideration the market features of leptokurtosis, volatility clustering and the leverage effect.

Design/methodology/approach

Augmented Dickey-Fuller, Phillips-Perron and Kwaitkowski-Phillips-Schmidt-Shin tests are deployed to check stationarity of the series. Autocorrelation function, partial autocorrelation function and Ljung-Box statistics are employed to check the applicability of volatility models. An exponential generalized auto regressive conditionally heteroskedastic model is deployed to test the seasonality, where the conditional mean equation is a switching model with dummy variables for each month of the year.

Findings

Though the financial year in India stretches from April to March, the stock market exhibits a November effect (returns in November are the highest). Cultural factors, misattribution bias and liquidity hypothesis seem to explain the phenomenon.

Research limitations/implications

The paper endeavors to provide a review of possible explanations behind month-of-the-year effect documented in literature in the past four decades. Further, the unique evidence from the Indian stock market supports the argument in the literature that monthly seasonality, by nature, may not be a consistent/robust phenomenon. Therefore, it needs to be examined from time to time.

Originality/value

As the seasonality in the stock market and resultant anomalies are dynamic phenomena, the paper reports the current seasonality/anomalies prevalent in the Indian market. This would aid investors in designing short-term investment portfolios (based on anomalies present) in order to earn abnormal returns.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Mike Vuolo, Christopher Uggen and Sarah Lageson

This paper tests whether employers responded particularly negatively to African American job applicants during the deep U.S. recession that began in 2007. Theories of…

Abstract

This paper tests whether employers responded particularly negatively to African American job applicants during the deep U.S. recession that began in 2007. Theories of labor queuing and social closure posit that members of privileged groups will act to minimize labor market competition in times of economic turbulence, which could advantage Whites relative to African Americans. Although social closure should be weakest in the less desirable, low-wage job market, it may extend downward during recessions, pushing minority groups further down the labor queue and exacerbating racial inequalities in hiring. We consider two complementary data sources: (1) a field experiment with a randomized block design and (2) the nationally representative NLSY97 sample. Contrary to expectations, both analyses reveal a comparable recession-based decline in job prospects for White and African American male applicants, implying that hiring managers did not adapt new forms of social closure and demonstrating the durability of inequality even in times of structural change. Despite this proportionate drop, however, the recession left African Americans in an extremely disadvantaged position. Whites during the recession obtained favorable responses from employers at rates similar to African Americans prior to the recession. The combination of experimental methods and nationally representative longitudinal data yields strong evidence on how race and recession affect job prospects in the low-wage labor market.

Details

Emerging Conceptions of Work, Management and the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-459-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Abstract

Details

Intellectual Capital and Public Sector Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-169-4

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