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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Wolfgang A. Markham, Chris Bonell, Adam Fletcher and Paul Aveyard

Substance use prevalence varies considerably between schools, but to date, whole school approaches for reducing substance use have only been moderately effective. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Substance use prevalence varies considerably between schools, but to date, whole school approaches for reducing substance use have only been moderately effective. The purpose of this paper is to develop a novel multifaceted whole-school approach to reduce substance use primarily among teenagers aged 11-14 years.

Design/methodology/approach

The outlined approach is premised on the proposal that schools can reduce the harms associated with substance use by promoting school connectedness and improving the school-related experiences of weakly connected and disconnected students. The aim of this approach is to develop students’ autonomy so that they may act in their real and long-term interests. This may be attained by promoting the realisation of essential human capacities for: practical reasoning – through valued opportunities for cognitive development and affiliation – through valued opportunities for affective development that advance students sense of acceptance within school. Schools may achieve this, it is proposed, by providing outlined forms of appropriate formal support and formal control that are augmented by particular features of school organisation, curriculum and pedagogic practice, which are also described.

Findings

A theoretically driven understanding of a whole school approach for reducing teenage substance use is outlined.

Originality/value

The outlined approach may usefully inform the development of future whole school interventions aiming to reduce problematic substance use among school students. Additional potential benefits include more successful student life trajectories.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Emma Croghan, Paul Aveyard and Carol Johnson

There is a discrepancy between the ease of purchase of cigarettes reported by young people themselves and the results of ease of purchase obtained by tests done by…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a discrepancy between the ease of purchase of cigarettes reported by young people themselves and the results of ease of purchase obtained by tests done by official sources such as Trading Standards Units. This discrepancy suggests that either data from young people or from trading standards are unreliable. This research set out to find out whether young peoples’ perceptions of easy purchasing from shops were true.

Design/methodology/approach

Six volunteer young people visited shops around the West Midlands region and attempted to buy cigarettes. They conducted the attempt in as realistic fashion as possible. All volunteers were assessed independently as looking under 16. Shopkeeper, shop, area and youth attributes were recorded

Findings

Young people were able to make purchases in 31 out of 38 shops. The young people were very surprised by their rates of successful purchase attempts across such a large geographical area.

Practical implications

Shopkeepers and communities need to be given more help to recognise underage youth purchasers in order to reduce this important source of tobacco to young people. Trading standards protocols for test purchases need to be revised to reflect the reality of ease of purchasing for young people.

Originality/value

This research confirms that young people who say that it is possible to buy cigarettes from shops appear to generally be correct in their perceptions.

Details

Health Education, vol. 105 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Mike Nolan, Sue Davies and Jayne Brown

Long‐term care in general, and care homes in particular, have never enjoyed high status as a place to live and work. This remains the case. In large part this marginalised…

Abstract

Long‐term care in general, and care homes in particular, have never enjoyed high status as a place to live and work. This remains the case. In large part this marginalised position is due to the continued failure to value the contribution that care homes make to supporting frail and vulnerable older people. In order to promote a more positive vision of what can be achieved in care homes, this paper argues for the adoption of a relationship‐centred approach to care. The need for such a model is described, and how it might be applied using the ‘Senses Framework’ is considered. It is argued that adopting such a philosophy will provide a clearer sense of therapeutic direction for staff working in care homes, as well as more explicitly recognising the contribution that residents and relatives can make to creating an ‘enriched environment’ of care.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Gary D. Holt

Business failure has evolved a major research domain, both of corporate finance generally and of construction management, equally. Much of this attention has focused on…

Abstract

Purpose

Business failure has evolved a major research domain, both of corporate finance generally and of construction management, equally. Much of this attention has focused on assessing business “health” to predict longevity, but less so, on causal agents of failure. The aim of this study is to synthesise published knowledge in the subject domain to explore construction failure agents.

Design/methodology/approach

Extant literature drawn from both corporate finance and construction management disciplines are synthesised. Subjective, textual analysis is undertaken and causal agents thematically grouped. A failure relationship model is derived that conceptualises construction business failure in relation to its operating universe.

Findings

Generic failure agents (GFA) (ordered, based on percentage frequency among the literature observed) are shown to be: managerial, financial, company characteristics, and macroeconomic. The first three are proffered to reciprocally interact within a “universe” defined by the latter. Numerous sub‐causal agents (SCA) are attributed to each generic agent. The role of innovation is suggested to hold potential negative (as well as positive) impacts on mitigating GFA and SCA.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations relate to synthesis of contemporary published evidence, so a progressive iteration would be empirical study of identified agents within live construction environments. An implication is the call for research realignment; from emphasis on business health assessment, to that of root causal agents.

Practical implications

Advancement of theory relating to business failure has significant implications for construction management research.

Originality/value

The failure relationship model and its linkage to innovation is novel.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Amon Simba and Nathanael Ojong

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a multi-layered theoretical framework to enable engaged scholarship to develop as a practice in entrepreneurship and small…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a multi-layered theoretical framework to enable engaged scholarship to develop as a practice in entrepreneurship and small business research. To do so, it illuminates the salient features of engaged scholarship, collaborative learning and actor-network theory (ANT).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows a narrative or traditional literature review design. Specifically, it adopts a thematic approach for summarising and synthesising a body of literature on engaged scholarship, collaborative learning and ANT with the view to develop a new multi-layered theoretical framework.

Findings

Applying the theory of engaged scholarship to pivot entrepreneurship/SME research provides scholars with an opportunity to unlock the theory vs practice paradox. Moreover, engaged scholarship offers valuable instructions for encouraging interactionism between entrepreneurship researchers and practitioners as well as reconcile their polarised views. Co-production and co-creation of knowledge addresses the concerns often raised by the practitioner community regarding the relevance and applicability of academic research to practice.

Practical implications

The proposed multi-layered framework provides entrepreneurship researchers, and the practitioner community with a taxonomy to use to encourage a joint approach to research. Developing deep partnerships between academics and practitioners can produce outcomes that satisfy the twin imperatives of scholarship that can be of high quality as well as a value to society.

Originality/value

The paper advances the theory and practice of engaged scholarship in new ways that are not common in entrepreneurship/SME research. This enables engaged scholarship to develop as a practice in entrepreneurship and small firms’ research. Through applying the proposed multi-layered framework in research, academics can deliver fully developed solutions for practical problems. The framework is useful in the theory vs practice and entrepreneurship researchers vs practitioner debates.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2020

Nicola Davies and Teresa Burdett

Integrated healthcare is a central tenant of the NHS Long Term Plan (NHS, 2019). NICE in 2019 published guidelines; advising the integration of multidisciplinary…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrated healthcare is a central tenant of the NHS Long Term Plan (NHS, 2019). NICE in 2019 published guidelines; advising the integration of multidisciplinary professionals which may lead to an improvement in conservative treatment methods of pelvic organ prolapse. Therefore, current literature on the conservative treatments for pelvic organ prolapse needs to be reviewed to ascertain if an integrated approach would improve the symptoms and quality of life for women.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the literature between 2013 and 2018 was implemented. Papers included were written in English, peer-reviewed and consisted of treatments of pelvic organ prolapse in women. Papers containing surgical interventions, postpartum participants, reviews, evaluations, guidelines, follow-up studies, focusing on cost effectiveness, sexual function were excluded.

Findings

Seven studies in total were included, and two overarching themes were identified: quality of life after treatment and the effect of conservative treatment on pelvic organ prolapse symptoms. The literature suggested that integrating care had a more positive outcome on pelvic organ symptoms and quality of life.

Research limitations/implications

To develop a robust enhanced model of care for conservative treatment of pelvic organ prolapse through more mixed method or qualitative research, that incorporates integrative treatment methods with collaboration from multidisciplinary professionals.

Practical implications

The practical implications of integrating the conservative management of pelvic organ prolapse is the communication between the multidisciplinary team must be exceptional to ensure everyone understands and agrees the treatment that is being provided to patient. Also, effective teamwork is important to ensure the patient receives the best care with input from the correct disciplines. The multi-professional team will need to have regular meetings to discuss and implement care plans for patients that might prove difficult to schedule due to differing commitments and priorities. This must be overcome to insure a successful and effective integrated approach to pelvic organ prolapse is delivered.

Social implications

The social implications of integrating the professional approach to women's care of pelvic organ prolapse involves reducing the severity of the symptoms therefore, increasing the quality of life. This may result in the reduction of surgical intervention due to the patient being satisfied with the conservative management. Through integrating the management of the prolapse the patient will receive an accessible individualised care plan pathway that focuses on treating or reducing the impact of the symptoms that are bothersome to the patient whilst managing patient expectations. Patients will also, be reassured by the number of multi-disciplinary professionals involved in their care.

Originality/value

Global integration of conservative treatments and multidisciplinary-professionals specialising in pelvic organ prolapse and pelvic floor dysfunction is needed.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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