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Article

Brian Briggeman and Quatie Jorgensen

Many associations in the Farm Credit System, which are financial cooperatives, pay their member‐borrowers a cash patronage payment based on the amount of loan volume with…

Abstract

Purpose

Many associations in the Farm Credit System, which are financial cooperatives, pay their member‐borrowers a cash patronage payment based on the amount of loan volume with the association. In today's competitive lending environment, some Farm Credit associations have offered lower interest rates on new loans but these new member‐borrowers have to forgo their cash patronage payment to receive this new, lower‐interest rate loan. The purpose of this paper is to identify Farm Credit member‐borrowers' preferences for patronage refunds received as a cash payment versus lower fixed real estate interest rates.

Design/methodology/approach

Preferences for patronage refunds or lower fixed interest rates are elicited from Farm Credit Services of East Central Oklahoma member‐borrowers via conjoint analysis.

Findings

Results show that member‐borrowers strongly prefer patronage refunds compared to lower fixed interest rates.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills a need to better understand patronage refund programs within the Farm Credit System.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 69 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Topics in Analytical Political Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-809-4

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Article

Andriani Kusumawati, Sari Listyorini, Suharyono and Edy Yulianto

This study aims to examine the impact of religiosity on fashion knowledge, consumer-perceived value and patronage intention.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of religiosity on fashion knowledge, consumer-perceived value and patronage intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applied purposive sampling method. The population size used a minimum number of samples (100) in the WarpPLS analysis. The inferential statistical technique used is structural equation modeling. A tool for analyzing the structural models is the partial least square method.

Findings

Religiosity is a consumer belief in religion, which does not generate fashion knowledge so that high and low religiousness cannot increase or decrease fashion knowledge. Consumer confidence in their religion can increase consumer-perceived value of Muslim fashion products. It causes consumers to behave positively toward future behavioral intentions, that is, the patronage intention. Consumer religiosity is not the cause of patronage intention so that the high or low level of religiousness does not increase or decrease in the willingness of consumers to visit the store (or patronage intention). Fashion knowledge has a positive influence on consumer-perceived value. Consumer knowledge of fashion can increase the patronage of consumer intention toward Muslim fashion products. Fashion knowledge brings the knowledge to consumers in regard to Islamic law that regulates the prohibited and allowed actions, especially in wearing fashion. The high or low level of consumer-perceived value does not provide a cause for increase or decrease in the willingness of consumers to revisit the store (or patronage intention).

Originality/value

With regard to the relationship between religiosity and knowledge, it is found that there are still limited studies and differences in the sectors studied regarding the influence of religiosity and knowledge. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the religiosity variable in influencing consumer-perceived value has not been used in previous studies. Religiosity is associated with consumer-perceived value expressed as originality in this study because the researcher has not found this relationship in the previous studies. Regarding the relationship between religiosity and store patronage intention, it is found that there are still different opinions in the research results on the effect of religiosity and store patronage intention. Concerning the relationship between knowledge and consumer-perceived value, it is found that there are still different opinions in the research results on the effect of knowledge and consumer-perceived value. The authors found no use of the knowledge variable in influencing store patronage intention in previous research studies. Knowledge associated with store patronage intention is expressed as the originality trait in this study because the researcher has not found this relationship in the previous studies. As for the relationship between consumer-perceived value and store patronage intention, it is found that there are still different opinions in the research results of the study regarding the influence of consumer-perceived value and store patronage intention.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article

Nwamaka A. Anaza and Brian N. Rutherford

In an overwhelming portion of the US service economy, the multifaceted responsibilities that frontline employees play as patrons have been overlooked within the academic…

Abstract

Purpose

In an overwhelming portion of the US service economy, the multifaceted responsibilities that frontline employees play as patrons have been overlooked within the academic literature. The notion of employees as customers is a common business practice that garners sizeable benefits to both the firm and its employees; unfortunately, research on this topic is still in its infancy. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of internal marketing and job satisfaction on employee patronage, and the role of patronage on employee engagement in a Cooperative Extension Service System.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey administered to Cooperative Extension employees in frontline service roles was used to test the proposed structural model. Structural equation modeling carried out using the Amos 18.0 software program was employed to analyze the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

It was found that internal marketing is composed of five dimensions, as tested using a second‐order hierarchical structure. Based on the hypothesized linkages, internal marketing and job satisfaction were revealed to be two important factors relevant in determining employee patronage. Furthermore, the results show that employee patronage positively influences employee engagement, thus advancing the benefits of employees in dual roles.

Practical implications

The findings show that the internal and external role of employees is reflective of the firm's ability to grow two important relationships that are vital to the company's success. To tap into employees as patrons, organizations must carefully and simultaneously implement internal marketing practices most suitable to the structure of their market and firm. Particularly, communicating to employees the favorable qualities of a service through reoccurring training programs also serves as a vital means of building interaction between the firm and its customers.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is two fold. First, it reveals an alternative way of measuring internal marketing, and encourages the future assessment of internal marketing as a multi‐dimensional structure rather than a one‐dimensional factor. Second, this research confirms the presence of employee patronage, while also examining predictors and outcomes of employee patronage in a service industry.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article

Davide Settembre Blundo, Fernando Enrique García Muiña, Alfonso Pedro Fernández del Hoyo, Maria Pia Riccardi and Anna Lucia Maramotti Politi

The purpose of this paper is to present alternative management practice methods for the cultural heritage sector apart from the traditional public support model. These…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present alternative management practice methods for the cultural heritage sector apart from the traditional public support model. These alternatives rely on sponsorship and patronage as well as the newer and more innovative public-private partnership (PPP).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is organized in two conceptual sections based on a literature review. The first section presents and compares two closely associated business strategy forms that are increasingly becoming popular within companies: sponsorship and patronage. These strategies are analyzed to show their advantages and disadvantages and are assessed based on their best uses in terms of the benefits from their implementation to all stakeholders involved (benefactors, recipients and the public) and, more particularly, to the benefactor’s company communication policy. The second section analyzes the PPP as a newer innovative practice in the cultural heritage sector, a recent development that has great potential, especially during an economic crisis where public funds are reduced, which risks the future recovery and proper maintenance of sites.

Findings

In the paper, the authors stressed that sponsorship, patronage and PPP are not merely alternative ways of primarily obtaining government funding for the cultural heritage sector but are also new strategic management practices that, when properly performed, will not only preserve and improve the sector but also allow more value to be distributed among all stakeholders.

Originality/value

Although the topic of PPP is treated fairly in the scientific literature, especially with regard to infrastructure, there are few cases of the application of this model to cultural heritage management.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article

Suja R. Nair

There is tremendous growth potential for food and grocery (F&G) retail in an emerging market like India. Bengaluru is the third most populous city of India. With a total…

Abstract

Purpose

There is tremendous growth potential for food and grocery (F&G) retail in an emerging market like India. Bengaluru is the third most populous city of India. With a total consumption expenditure of Rs 2,020 billion and per capita retail expenditure of Rs 67,289 (in 2015), Bengaluru has emerged as a sought-after retail market with many foreign and national brands opening stores here. The purpose of this paper is to use the sign of causality to determine the relationships between store attributes, satisfaction, patronage intention and lifestyles in F&G retailing in Bengaluru.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimentation framework using causal design was developed to establish relationships between variables: store attributes, satisfaction, patronage intention and lifestyle. A primary survey was conducted using a structured non-disguised questionnaire involving 346 F&G shoppers from Bengaluru. Hayes regression models were adapted and hypothesized relationships between the variables tested using correlation, multiple regression and Hayes regression/path analysis.

Findings

Satisfaction acts as a mediator in the relationship between store attributes and patronage intention. Lifestyle does not act as the moderator in the relationships between store attributes and patronage- intention; and, satisfaction and patronage intention.

Research limitations/implications

In experiments that test for causality a big limitation is lower internal validity in the absence of control mechanisms, unlike laboratory studies. Another limitation is that this study is limited to urban Bengaluru F&G shoppers, variations could occur if the study is extended to include rural shoppers.

Practical implications

With 100 percent foreign direct investment permitted in the F&G category in India, the research outcomes will be useful to all food retailers (prospective and current) interested in this retail market. Moreover, in the existing competitive scenario, understanding of associative influences between store attributes, satisfaction, patronage intention and lifestyle will enable retailers comprehend F&G shoppers retailing behavior. This information can be used for targeted marketing and operational strategies, which will deliver more success in marketing relationship management, building competitive advantage and enhancing marketing efforts profitably.

Originality/value

This paper is a new and original contribution to the existing literature on causal relationships among variables in retail marketing research. It is different from prior studies that analyzed shoppers F&G behavior, in that it extends the understanding of the role of “satisfaction” as a mediator and “lifestyle” not a moderator, when testing the causality of store attributes on patronage intention.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Tianwei Zhang, Mindy Mallory and Peter Barry

The authors aim to investigate what influences a Farm Credit System association to make a patronage refund payment. In particular, they seek to investigate what causes the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors aim to investigate what influences a Farm Credit System association to make a patronage refund payment. In particular, they seek to investigate what causes the regional heterogeneity in the patronage refund payment decision. It is unclear whether patronage refunds have been used more as a capital management tool or as a member recruitment and retention tool. This study aims to bring some clarity to this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use an empirical logistic model to estimate the probability of a positive patronage refund payment by a Farm Credit System association, controlling for variables related to the associations' balance sheet as reported in the associations' quarterly call reports.

Findings

The authors find there is evidence that Farm Credit Service associations use patronage refunds as a capital management tool, at least in part. However, they also find that there are still significant regional differences in the patronage refund payment decision even after controlling for variables affecting the associations' balance sheet. The authors conclude that this likely represents member heterogeneity in preferences for patronage refunds versus a discounted interest rate.

Originality/value

The present study is one of the few empirical papers to examine a broad panel of financial cooperatives. Because of this, the authors' paper provides valuable insight into the aggregate behavior of Farm Credit Service associations, particularly into whether they use patronage refunds as a capital management tool, or as a marketing and retention tool.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

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Article

Dong Hong Zhu, Hui Sun and Ya Ping Chang

With the development of location-based services and mobile phones, local retailing stores have the opportunity to send location-based advertisings (LBAs) to consumers at a…

Abstract

Purpose

With the development of location-based services and mobile phones, local retailing stores have the opportunity to send location-based advertisings (LBAs) to consumers at a right time and right place. However, knowledge about the influence of LBAs on consumers’ store patronage is limited. The purpose of this paper is to understand how the content of LBAs influences consumers’ store patronage intention. In particular, the paper investigates the influence of perceived accuracy and transaction cost reduction from the content of LBAs on consumers’ store patronage intention through the emotional reactions of pleasure and arousal.

Design/methodology/approach

This study developed a theoretical model to examine how the content of LBAs influences the store patronage intention of consumers. Empirical data were collected from 351 undergraduate and graduate students. The partial least squares technique was used to test the research model.

Findings

Perceived accuracy and transaction cost reduction from the content of LBAs have a significant influence on the store patronage intention of consumers through pleasure and arousal. Brand image and purchase plan are control variables.

Originality/value

Knowledge about the influence of LBAs on consumer store patronage is limited. This study provides empirical evidence about how perceived accuracy and transaction cost reduction from the content of LBAs affect the emotional reactions of consumers and then determine their store patronage intention.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article

Muhammad Sabbir Rahman, Fadi Abdel Muniem Abdel Fattah, Mahmud Zaman and Hasliza Hassan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of service quality, customer’s satisfaction and religiosity on customer’s patronage decision toward health insurance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of service quality, customer’s satisfaction and religiosity on customer’s patronage decision toward health insurance products. The paper also assesses the influence of religiosity on customer’s patronage decision. The influence of customers’ satisfaction as mediation between service quality and customer’s patronage decision was also measured.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was developed and administered to a sample of 200 respondents. This research applied the exploratory factor analysis, the confirmatory factor analysis and the structural equation modeling to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The findings indicate that customers’ religiosity behavior has a significant influence on customer’s patronage decision for selecting health insurance products. The results also indicated that the role of customer’s satisfaction as a mediator in between the relationship of service quality and customer’s patronage decision is significant.

Research limitations/implications

This research is a cross-sectional study consisting of 200 respondents. In addition, the elements of the sample were Malaysian customers using health insurance products and services.

Practical implications

This study suggests that customers of health insurance products are more concerned with perceived service quality and perceived satisfaction. The role of religiosity also plays a dominant role. As a result, managers of the health insurance service providers need to focus more on benefits of service varieties centered toward their target customers in order to gain higher patronage decision of health insurance products.

Originality/value

The study sought to address the gap of religiosity aspects in health insurance products through intensive literature and offer a conceptual framework that tested service quality, customer’s satisfaction and religiosity in one integrated model under the perspective of health insurance industry. More importantly, it also examines the influence of religiosity on patronage behavior, thus shedding insights into the opportunities for understanding consumers in detail.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article

Eunyoung (Christine) Sung and Patricia Huddleston

This paper explores the antecedents and consequences of consumers’ need for self-image congruence on their retail patronage of department (high-end) and discount (low-end…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the antecedents and consequences of consumers’ need for self-image congruence on their retail patronage of department (high-end) and discount (low-end) stores to purchase name-brand products in two product categories, apparel and home décor. It also compared online to offline shopping and considered two mediator variables, frugality and materialism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzed the hypothesized relationships using structural equation modeling (SEM) and MANOVA. Study 1 suggested the model using secondary data, and Study 2 measured and confirmed the relationships using scenario-based online survey data. An MANOVA test was used to compare the shopping behavior of consumers with high and low need for self-image congruence.

Findings

A strong causal link was found between concern with appearance and need for self-image congruence, and a positive relationship between need for self-image congruence and high- and low-end retail store patronage offline and online. While the group with high (vs low) need for self-image congruence was more likely to patronize department stores, unexpectedly, both the high and low self-image congruence groups were equally likely to shop at discount stores.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that marketing messages focusing on concern for appearance may succeed by tapping into consumers’ need for self-image congruence with brand product/retail store images. Results also showed that consumers with high self-image congruence often patronize discount retail stores, suggesting marketing opportunities for low-end retailers.

Originality/value

Because consumers with high need for self-image congruence patronize both department and discount stores, it is suggested that self-image congruity may be multi-dimensional. The current study is also the first to examine structural relationships to test patronage behavior between department and discount stores offline and online.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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