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1 – 10 of 132
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

John E. Prescott and Patrick T. Gibbons

How many companies are truly prepared for the increased competitive threats they will face in this decade? The authors suggest that firms assess the type of internal…

Abstract

How many companies are truly prepared for the increased competitive threats they will face in this decade? The authors suggest that firms assess the type of internal information infrastructure that makes most sense for their competitive intelligence efforts.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Pamela Sharkey Scott and Patrick T. Gibbons

This paper aims to enhance the understanding of how subsidiary CEOs can move their unit's activities up the value chain and reduce the risk of subsidiary closure and

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to enhance the understanding of how subsidiary CEOs can move their unit's activities up the value chain and reduce the risk of subsidiary closure and relocation of its activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The entire population of over 1,100 subsidiaries of multinational corporations (MNCs) located in Ireland were sampled for this study, representing a diversified pool in terms of foreign ownership. Respondents were largely subsidiary CEOs. In addition, 24 subsidiary CEOs/directors from a cross section of eight subsidiaries were interviewed.

Findings

CEOs/directors are taking active steps to enhance their subsidiary's role within the MNC and to move their activities up the value chain. These include positioning to extend subsidiary autonomy, building information networks, creating a climate for entrepreneurship and promoting strategy development processes.

Research limitations/implications

Results from the survey are subject to the standard limitations and a larger pool of interviewees may have strengthened the findings.

Practical implications

Little practical guidance is available to subsidiary CEOs on how they can reduce their subsidiary's relocation risk. This paper addresses this gap and provides a stimulus to CEOs to be proactive in managing their subsidiary's ability to recognize and exploit opportunities to enhance subsidiary contribution and position within their MNC.

Originality/value

While other papers have focused on how subsidiaries can generate initiatives or promote entrepreneurship, the unique contribution of this paper is the identification of strategies CEOs can adopt to enhance their subsidiary's ability to respond to opportunities and position for survival and growth within their MNC.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Pamela Scott and Patrick T. Gibbons

Subsidiary units have traditionally feared relocation of their activities to lower‐cost locations. The authors identify other emerging threats which are changing how

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Abstract

Purpose

Subsidiary units have traditionally feared relocation of their activities to lower‐cost locations. The authors identify other emerging threats which are changing how multinational corporations (MNCs) manage their subsidiary units, and develop a cycle of subsidiary decline demonstrating how these threats can undermine a subsidiary's position within the MNC.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the results of a survey targeted at over 1,100 subsidiary CEOs of MNCs located in Ireland, a program of in‐depth interviews of 24 subsidiary CEOs/directors, and a review of the literature relating to MNC and subsidiary management, are combined to identify emerging threats to subsidiary activities.

Findings

The main threats to subsidiaries' efforts to enhance their role within the MNC comprise: erosion of barriers to trade; growing complexities in corporate governance; and increasingly sophisticated information and communication technology (ICT) capabilities. These threats are enabling the disaggregation of value chains and increased headquarters monitoring and control. This shift in how subsidiaries are managed is leading to a cycle of subsidiary decline.

Research limitations/implications

the results from the survey are subject to the standard limitations and a larger pool of interviewees may have reinforced the qualitative findings.

Practical implications

To increase subsidiary managers' awareness of the need for a strategic response, the authors develop a cycle of subsidiary decline which illustrates how these emerging threats combine to undermine a subsidiary's position within the MNC. Disaggregating value chains and tighter headquarters control can reduce subsidiary bargaining power constraining its abilities to challenge for resources, in turn restraining its combinative capabilities and leading to a decline in its position and contribution to the MNC.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to build a framework illustrating how emerging threats in the external environment may impact the ability of subsidiary units to maintain and develop their position within the MNC.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Lai Hong Chung, Patrick T. Gibbons and Herbert P. Schoch

This study examines the control issues related to three major flows among MNC subsidiaries: knowledge flows, product flows and capital flows. It also investigates the…

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Abstract

This study examines the control issues related to three major flows among MNC subsidiaries: knowledge flows, product flows and capital flows. It also investigates the relationship between the strategic management style of headquarters and the control approaches employed. The results show the dominance of output control, even in situations where researchers have argued that they should not be relied upon. The study also found that as knowledge flow increases, reliance on financial control decreases and reliance on socialisation control increases. Consistent with other studies, the dominant management style is the strategic control style, while the least popular is the financial control style. The paper calls for using alternative theoretical lenses, such as institutional theory, to provide additional insights not available through the contingency lens.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Catherine Gorrell

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Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Jennifer Barry, Christine Monahan, Sharon Ferguson, Kelley Lee, Ruth Kelly, Mark Monahan, Rebecca Murphy, Patrick Gibbons and Agnes Higgins

The purpose of this paper is to provide first-hand reflective narratives from participants of their involvement in the overall process, with particular reference to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide first-hand reflective narratives from participants of their involvement in the overall process, with particular reference to the benefits and challenges of engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Five participants agreed to write a reflective piece of approximately 500 words on their involvement in the PhotoVoice project.

Findings

The reflective narratives in this paper demonstrate the personal and professional benefits of sustained and meaningful engagement, while challenges such as power imbalances, identity management, time and cost commitments are discussed.

Practical implications

PhotoVoice is a methodology that has the potential to democratise knowledge production and dissemination.

Originality/value

There are scant examples in the PhotoVoice literature of the inclusion of participants involvement in dissemination activities. The reflective narratives in this paper demonstrate the personal and professional benefits of sustained and meaningful engagement, while challenges such as power imbalances, identity management, time and cost commitments are discussed.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2018

Sarah Browne, Pamela Sharkey Scott, Vincent Mangematin and Patrick Gibbons

The purpose of this paper is to provide guidelines for practitioners for developing creative strategies and new business models.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide guidelines for practitioners for developing creative strategies and new business models.

Design/Methodology/Approach

This paper reviews more than 150 interviews with CEOs, directors and business unit heads from across functional areas over the past decade, and captures best practices in strategy development and business modelling.

Findings

Findings of this study were combined with a review of relevant research papers from leading academic and practitioner journals to identify three critical management practices: challenging mental models, looking beyond logic and encouraging openness for new ideas, which enable organizations to develop creative strategies for building better business models.

Originality/Value

This paper demonstrates how these three practices combined can serve as a much needed tool for creative strategy design and development, particularly for established companies, when confronted with new forms of competition.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Ruifang Wang and Patrick Gibbons

It is increasingly recognised that managers play a central role in organisational ambidexterity. While some scholars have recently begun to explain the nature and…

Abstract

Purpose

It is increasingly recognised that managers play a central role in organisational ambidexterity. While some scholars have recently begun to explain the nature and antecedents of ambidextrous behaviour among managers, much remains to be learned about the micro-foundations of this behaviour. Adopting a people–situation interaction approach, this paper investigates the antecedents to managerial ambidexterity from both situational and individual difference considerations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a quantitative approach using a combination of survey and archival data from 305 managers.

Findings

The results indicate that learning goal orientation is positively related with managerial ambidexterity, whereas there is no significant relationship between functional experience breadth and managerial ambidexterity. In testing moderation effects, discretionary slack is found to positively moderate the association between learning goal orientation and ambidexterity and between functional experiences and ambidexterity.

Practical implications

This paper provides suggestions on employees selection and training, along with organisational support, in enacting managerial ambidexterity.

Originality/value

Guided by individual difference theory, this paper adds value to one’s understanding of the antecedents to managerial ambidexterity. It contributes to the ambidexterity literature from the micro-foundation perspective.

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Paul M. Gibbons, Colin Kennedy, Stuart C. Burgess and Patrick Godfrey

A previous attempt to implement the use of historical measures of asset management effectiveness – as part of a value improvement model (VIM) for repetitive processes …

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Abstract

Purpose

A previous attempt to implement the use of historical measures of asset management effectiveness – as part of a value improvement model (VIM) for repetitive processes – had not been 100 percent successful within an airport operational engineering environment. Taking into account the more holistic approach realised through applying a soft systems methodology (SSM), the purpose of this paper was to use the CATWOE (Customers, Actors, Transaction, World View, Owner and Environment) tool to gain an understanding of the root definition of the problem statement developing a conceptual model used to facilitate an improvement to the implementation process.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology taken incorporated an action research approach combining case study research with an action research process of planning, observing and reflecting summarized as taking an action case research design.

Findings

This research has developed a visual and systematic framework that enables managers to understand, analyse and improve value in their asset management repetitive processes. The CATWOE root definition tool has been used to create a conceptual model of the problem area providing a holistic view of the stakeholders and the internal and external environmental constraints that the VIM for asset management sits within.

Research limitations/implications

The research was completed in‐situ at a single airport focused on a single group of assets managed by a single group of stakeholders. Future research should look to further develop the VIM and CATWOE approach in other asset management environments such as manufacturing as well as asset intensive service industries.

Originality/value

This research has taken a soft systems approach and successfully applied it to the implementation of hard systems measurements of asset management effectiveness within an airport operational engineering environment. Other managers with asset management responsibilities will find this approach useful in achieving their core objective to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their assets and the teams employed to maintain them at minimal total cost.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Abstract

Details

The Role of External Examining in Higher Education: Challenges and Best Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-174-5

1 – 10 of 132