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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Patrick Joseph Sullivan

The purpose of this paper is to consider some of the legal implications of adopting a harm minimisation approach in supporting people who self-injure within inpatient…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider some of the legal implications of adopting a harm minimisation approach in supporting people who self-injure within inpatient mental health units. It is argued that a focus on risk and the increasing influence of the law and legal styles of thinking often associated with the allocation of blame have produced a more risk adverse clinical environment. As a result health professionals are more likely to err on the side of caution rather than engage in practices that although potentially therapeutic are not without their risks.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis draws on the clinical, philosophical and legal literature to help understand how harm minimisation may support people who self-injure. It considers some of the complex medico-legal issues that arise in a clinical environment dominated by risk.

Findings

A focus on risk and accountability has produced an environment where the law and legal styles of thinking have come to influence practice. This is often associated with blame in the minds of the health professional. Given the legal obligation to prevent suicide, health professionals may take a conservative approach when working with people who self-injure. This makes the adoption of harm minimisation difficult.

Originality/value

This paper provides a legally informed analysis of some of the challenges associated with using harm minimisation techniques with people who self-injure. It adds to the literature regarding this area of clinical practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Fabien Martinez, Patrick O’Sullivan, Mark Smith and Mark Esposito

The purpose of this paper is to examine the conceptual construct of social innovation in business as distinct from social innovation implemented by civil society and the…

1400

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the conceptual construct of social innovation in business as distinct from social innovation implemented by civil society and the state. The general absence of sustained research and analysis of this phenomenon, and the dominance of grey and policy-oriented literature, mean that a broadly accepted definition of how social innovation theorises the changing role of business in society is missing

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative review of the representative literature on social innovation was conducted. The analysis focused on the key arguments made about the involvement of business actors in processes of social innovation and interweaved in this study to build a logically coherent definition of what social innovation in business means for the bulk of those who write and speak about it today. The scope of the literature review was expanded by integrating insights from the extant “business in society” and social innovation literatures, thereby adding clarity to the authors' conceptualisation.

Findings

The findings indicate that social innovation is best understood as a process driven by human relations, morality and creative capacity breaking routines and path dependencies. It fundamentally relies on the socially constructed dynamics between business and social actors who carry ideas, focus their energies, mobilise competences and create new complementarities to tackle social problems. Economic gain, in this approach, is at best an outcome of social innovation, not its engine.

Originality/value

What this literature review unveils that is unique about social innovation, and contributes to an enrichment of the “business in society” debate beyond the business case and win-win scenarios depicted by most scholars in this field, is that it best manifests itself as an informal social process that comes into existence at the margins of conventional ways of thinking and organising business activities. Business actors involved in social innovation are framed as self-directed and self-organised around the moral purpose of fostering social progress.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Patrick O'Sullivan and Suthisak Kraisornsuthasinee

In economic theory, the relationship between working/earning decisions and consumption/lifestyle decisions has been conceptualised in an almost entirely unidirectional…

Abstract

Purpose

In economic theory, the relationship between working/earning decisions and consumption/lifestyle decisions has been conceptualised in an almost entirely unidirectional manner: income from work taken as a given governs consumption and so lifestyle. This involves a narrowly inaccurate view of the consumption–work interaction. The purpose of this paper is to argue that this economist’s way of thinking about consumption and work needs to be replaced by a conception in which not only does realised income determine one’s consumption possibilities but also the desired level of consumption is itself a choice and a key determinant of how and how much one decides to work.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is designed as a conceptual contribution in which the above insight is linked to the extensive literature on sustainability.

Findings

When consumption is no longer thought of as determined by a given income constraint, it becomes possible to consider how people by modifying their consumption aspirations may be led not only to work less or differently but also to live and consume in a more sustainable manner. As a result of lesser pressure to work ever more, they may also be led to an ethical reappraisal of the way they work.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptualisation suggested is rich in implications for future research, for example, on links between consumerism and corruption; and on the impact of more ethical work choices on well-being. There is an implicit critique of much of HRM theory and practice which tends to instrumentalise work. The implications of artificial intelligence for future work are noted and, in this context, are surprisingly positive. The macro level implication of the need to move away from gross domestic product to more appropriate measures of socio-economic performance and well-being such as Social Progress Index (SPI) are noted.

Practical implications

The link between this widened conceptualisation of the consumption–work decision and the notion of voluntary simplicity is explored in detail and the latter is shown to apply also to the types of work/job chosen. This in turn is shown to have implications for management (especially HR) practice and for government policies both at micro and macro levels.

Social implications

This carries clear implications for work-life balance in people’s daily lives; and by choosing more ethical ways of working or types of job, there may be a significant pro-social impact.

Originality/value

This paper points to a widening of the notion of voluntary simplicity beyond merely consumption choices to apply also to work choices. In the discussion of moral philosophical underpinning of voluntary simplicity, the link is made with Buddhist wisdom of the Middle Way and sufficiency economy and with the Golden Mean of Stoicism.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Sandra Khalil and Patrick O’sullivan

The purpose of this paper is to provide further insight into internet social and environmental reporting (ISER) in the Middle East by investigating the ISER of Lebanese…

1216

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide further insight into internet social and environmental reporting (ISER) in the Middle East by investigating the ISER of Lebanese banks as well as their greenwashing behaviour and identifying its extent, quality and association with different variables such as profitability, size, religion and other variables.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a mixed methodology. Interviews were conducted to seek the opinions of banks towards corporate social responsibility (CSR). Content analysis of bank’s websites was used to examine the extent, quality and association of ISER with several bank characteristics.

Findings

The results show the prevalent use of ISER and greenwashing by Lebanese banks. The most disclosed category of ISER is community, whereas the least disclosed is environment. The study found a positive association between ISER and bank profitability, size, leverage and ownership concentration and an insignificant relationship with age and religion.

Research limitations/implications

The authors recognise that the sample is small and addresses a single context and that it could have been expanded to other Middle Eastern contexts. However, the study is exploratory focusing on the Lebanese banking sector which is one of the most developed in the region. Further longitudinal studies could also be conducted to complement the work. The process used to measure greenwashing could be enhanced by addressing the materiality of CSR disclosures to stakeholders and the purpose of communicating CSR information.

Practical implications

In light of the empirical findings, banks will gain a better understanding of the status and importance of ISER and will understand the risks of greenwashing leading them towards higher standard ISER and more ethical activities, which will have a positive impact on the Lebanese economy and society.

Originality/value

This study examines almost all aspects of online social and environmental disclosures including the webpage, CSR sections in addition to online published reports; it is an investigation about ISER with reference to Lebanon which has perhaps the most significant banking sector in the Middle East. It tackles the greenwashing issue in a new context and in a different way by examining its association with several variables. The study also investigates the association between religion and ISER which has seldom been tackled in similar studies.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Patrick H. Sullivan

Intellectual capital (IC) is a significant resource for many companies. This paper explains what IC is, the benefits IC can generate, how a firm can utilize those…

5122

Abstract

Intellectual capital (IC) is a significant resource for many companies. This paper explains what IC is, the benefits IC can generate, how a firm can utilize those benefits, the different roles a portfolio of IC assets can play, how firms can extract value from these portfolios, and the risks to a company that does not manage its intellectual property portfolio. The paper describes the steps for extracting value and outlines several ways to manage the firm’s IC assets. It discusses how a firm determines the three major elements of context and different procedures firms may opt to follow internally to realize their intellectual value. This paper also describes the ICM Gathering Group, the group of companies that have collectively created the knowledge the paper conveys. The paper explains how the Gathering has defined intellectual capital and how its member companies use their knowledge to the benefit of their respective organizations.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Patrick O’Sullivan

This paper aims to provide a brief overview of the anti-money laundering (AML) failings documented by the US Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations found in Hong Kong…

1388

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a brief overview of the anti-money laundering (AML) failings documented by the US Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations found in Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation (HSBC) Mexico. This paper focuses in on the key areas of concern raised by the 2012 report in respect of HSBC Mexico (HBMX) such as failure to undertake correct customer due diligence on high risk customers and repeated failings by senior management at HBMX to remedy these problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The relevant parts of the Subcommittee report relating to HBMX were examined along with the evidence submitted to the Subcommittee. From this examination, the author then noted the key examples of AML failings at HBMX and then commented on these examples while also referring to academic and regulatory guidance such as that from Financial Action Task Force.

Findings

Certain proposals are made throughout the paper, but these remain only suggestive. The key point is that the failings evident in HBMX may very well arise in other institutions, and this paper proposes how these failings may be resolved.

Research limitations/implications

Research for this paper remained limited to second-source references such as the Subcommittee report and the listed Exhibits along with other academic resources. The paper was also peer reviewed by a compliance officer. However, examining the paper from a more practical viewpoint may have struck a better balance between an optimal and realistic level of compliance.

Practical implications

Adopting an analytic approach to the subject of AML controls should aid those who work in compliance daily while also generating further commentary among both regulators and senior management within financial institutions.

Originality/value

The paper is the only one to date to focus on one geographical strand of the AML failings at HSBC and then comment on this from an academic perspective.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Patrick John O’Sullivan

The aim of the paper is to examine what type of relationship existed between the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and Riggs Bank in respect of anti-money…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to examine what type of relationship existed between the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and Riggs Bank in respect of anti-money laundering (AML) compliance. Different commentators have established certain trends in the interaction between a regulator and a regulated entity, and this paper seeks to apply these findings to the relationship between the OCC and Riggs Bank and ascertain where this example lies in the wider domain of regulatory relationships. The paper then examines whether the relationship between the OCC and HSBC United States was similar to the one between the OCC and Riggs Bank or did the regulator adopt a more aggressive supervisory stance. Throughout this work, there is also a focus on the underlying incentives which may adversely affect how a financial institution interacts with a financial regulator and possible solutions to this problem proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

Research undertaken by commentators was assessed and their findings as the different regulatory relationships that may develop between a regulator and a regulated entity were applied to the interactions between the OCC and two different financial institutions, namely, Riggs Bank and HSBC United States. Examples from the Senate Subcommittee Reports into the AML failings into these financial institutions were examined through the prism of pre-existing regulatory relationship categories.

Findings

The paper ultimately concludes that the OCC was far too passive in its interactions with both Riggs Bank and HSBC United States and that the primary underlying motivations for both institutions were profit- rather than compliance-led.

Research limitations/implications

One of the main limitations to this research was the absence of direct input from either personnel from the banking sector in the USA or of regulators from the same jurisdiction.

Practical implications

This paper proposes a number of practical solutions to recast the relationship between financial regulators and regulated institutions away from the former deferring to the latter to one where the former dictates to the latter.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to examine an actual regulatory relationship between a financial regulator and two different institutions that is reported in the public domain by applying pre-existing academic research on question of regulatory relationships and see how the practice differs or corresponds with the theory.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 59 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2012

Robert Dingwall

Purpose – To outline the history of ethical regulation in the social sciences and to question the proportionality of its costs and benefits.Methodology/approach …

Abstract

Purpose – To outline the history of ethical regulation in the social sciences and to question the proportionality of its costs and benefits.

Methodology/approach – Secondary analysis of primary literature.

Findings – Ethical regulation in the social sciences has been driven more by institutional reputation management than human subject protection. It has a range of social and economic costs that have not received adequate critical appraisal.

Social implications – Ethical regulation in the social sciences may be highly damaging to a society's ability to understand itself, particularly by constraining scientific research relative to journalism or imaginative forms of communication.

Originality/value of paper – Review of the most current research and an explanation of the positive case against regulation.

Details

Ethics in Social Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-878-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

T Kippenberger

Profiles Patrick O’Sullivan, CEO of UK‐based insurer Eagle Star. Looks at how he brought about change in a company that was in poor condition financially, culturally and…

4326

Abstract

Profiles Patrick O’Sullivan, CEO of UK‐based insurer Eagle Star. Looks at how he brought about change in a company that was in poor condition financially, culturally and competitively. Cites, in an inset, the ‘Workout’ US system which O’Sullivan brought into Eagle Star, and which was a resounding success. Describes how 3,000 staff (40%) have participated (some more than once!) in the change process.

Details

The Antidote, vol. 5 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-8483

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/14691930010324124. When citing…

1606

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/14691930010324124. When citing the article, please cite: Suzanne Harrison, Patrick H. Sullivan Sr, (2000), “Profiting from intellectual capital: Learning from leading companies”, Journal of Intellectual Capital, Vol. 1 Iss: 1, pp. 33 - 46.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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