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Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2016

Richard L. Miller

This chapter aims to discuss methods for promoting student engagement to counteract declining academic motivation and achievement in the contemporary setting.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter aims to discuss methods for promoting student engagement to counteract declining academic motivation and achievement in the contemporary setting.

Methodology/approach

In this chapter, two studies are presented that describe ways to promote student engagement in and out of the classroom. The in-class study was conducted with psychology students at the University of Nebraska at Kearney (UNK). The Student Course Engagement Questionnaire (SCEQ) developed by Handelsman, Briggs, Sullivan, and Towler (2005) was used to measure student engagement. Study 2 examined the extent to which four high-impact educational practices promoted student engagement. Undergraduate UNK students who had participated in undergraduate research, learning communities, service learning, or internships were surveyed.

Findings

The results of the first study indicated that instructors can promote engagement by how the structure of the classroom (discussion classes), individuation (knowing student names and keeping class sizes small), and teacher support in the form of being responsive to student questions, encouraging students to seek assistance, and assigning effective aids to learning. The second study indicated that undergraduate research and internships were more engaging than service learning or learning communities.

Originality/value

These results suggest practical methods for meeting a variety of student needs, including their need for relatedness — by encouraging them to seek assistance and knowing their names, competence — by assigning effective learning aids and autonomy — by encouraging intrinsically motivating activities.

Details

Integrating Curricular and Co-Curricular Endeavors to Enhance Student Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-063-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Patrick Skinner

In June 1985 an Austrian wine producer was found sweetening low‐priced wine for export to Germany, with an illegal substance, diethylene glycol. Subsequent investigation…

Abstract

In June 1985 an Austrian wine producer was found sweetening low‐priced wine for export to Germany, with an illegal substance, diethylene glycol. Subsequent investigation found a very small percentage of Austrian producers doing the same thing. The “Anti Freeze” connotation caught the imagination of the media, particularly in Britain, which had a field day of “humorous” and often inaccurate stories. Within a few weeks, Austrian wine sales dropped disastrously. The author, both an interested observer as well as a participant in the ensuing campaign to re‐establish Austrian wines, examines the story of the scandal, and more importantly, the sequence of action that followed. In particular, the article looks at the setting up and operation of the Austrian Wine Marketing Service and the worth of such organisations.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

A.L. Patrick

The 1993 industry survey in this journal updated. Increasingly the Cyprus wine industry is turning its attention to the making of higher quality table wines, to satisfy an…

Abstract

The 1993 industry survey in this journal updated. Increasingly the Cyprus wine industry is turning its attention to the making of higher quality table wines, to satisfy an ever‐growing local market, comprised mostly of two million foreign tourist arrivals, 30,000 foreign residents and a slowly growing segment of Cypriot professional and business people. Despite the planting of new grape varieties and setting up of regional wineries near the vineyards, there is still a long way to go, before quality wines are a significant sector of production and for some years the Cyprus industry will depend on exports of low‐price bulk wines and spirits for survival and profit For the moment, though, 1994 was a good year overall and the transition of the industry is gathering pace. The author surveys the structure of the industry, developments in vine‐growing and wine‐making, current local and export marketing trends and future prospects.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Patrick A.L. Skinner

The author examines the background to the very limited penetration into overseas markets like the U.K. by bottled table wine, diminishing sherry sales and low‐price…

Abstract

The author examines the background to the very limited penetration into overseas markets like the U.K. by bottled table wine, diminishing sherry sales and low‐price exports of aromatics, in the context of the structure of the industry, the vines, the groves, wine‐makers and marketeers. Based on more than a year's study and marketing at all levels, he concludes that the Cyprus industry really has reached the cross roads and proposes some of the directions it should take. It must move quickly and positively.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Christopher White

– The purpose of the study is to examine the way different motivational types from Self-Determination Theory (SDT) influence antecedents of customer satisfaction.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine the way different motivational types from Self-Determination Theory (SDT) influence antecedents of customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings in this study were generated with a quantitative design using path analysis on data collected at two stages during an extended service encounter.

Findings

Each motivation type played a unique and important role in influencing the antecedents of satisfaction, namely, positive and negative emotions and perceptions of service quality. As hypothesised, motives associated with higher levels of autonomy were consistently stronger predictors of positive emotions and service quality. The influence of motives on the antecedents did not change significantly over time, whereas significant differences were noted between all antecedents and satisfaction. The model explained 54 and 63 per cent of the variance in satisfaction in times one and two, respectively.

Originality/value

This is the first time that motivation as conceptualised from an SDT perspective has been applied to understanding the dynamic nature of customer satisfaction. The findings offer considerable opportunities for follow-up studies and the motivation types can provide practitioners with a stable and efficient segmentation option.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2018

Jonathan Skinner

The purpose of this paper is to present contrasting approaches to the descriptive case study of tourism to the buried city of Plymouth, Montserrat, an example of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present contrasting approaches to the descriptive case study of tourism to the buried city of Plymouth, Montserrat, an example of the marketing and burying – the supply and demand – of apocalyptic dark tourism on the island.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study mixed-methods methodology is adopted, and findings are derived from tour guiding fieldwork, guide and tourist interviews, and an analysis of travel writing and tourism marketing campaigns.

Findings

Dark tourism is viewed as a contentious and problematic concept: it attracts and repels tourism to the former capital Plymouth, Montserrat. After 20 years of the volcano crisis, the islanders, government and Tourist Board are commemorating resilience living with the volcano and regeneration in a disaster scenario. Marketing and consumption approaches to dark tourism elucidate different facets to the case study of “the buried city” of Plymouth, Montserrat, and the Montserrat Springs Hotel overlooking Plymouth. The disjunct between these two types of approach to dark tourism, as well as the different criteria attached to working definitions of dark tourism – and the range of interests in apocalyptic dark tourism into the city and its surrounds – show some of the problems and limitations with theoretical and scalar discussions on dark tourism.

Research limitations/implications

The paper’s implications are that both supply and demand approaches to dark tourism are needed to fully understand a dark tourism destination and to reconcile the disjunct between these two approaches and the perspectives of tourist industry and tourism users.

Originality/value

This is a descriptive dark tourism case study of a former capital city examined from both supply and demand perspectives. It introduces the apocalyptic to dark tourism destination analysis.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2014

Johnmarshall Reeve and Sung Hyeon Cheon

Our ongoing program of research works with teachers to help them become more autonomy supportive during instruction and hence more able to promote students’ classroom…

Abstract

Purpose

Our ongoing program of research works with teachers to help them become more autonomy supportive during instruction and hence more able to promote students’ classroom motivation and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

We have published five experimentally based, longitudinally designed, teacher-focused intervention studies that have tested the effectiveness and educational benefits of an autonomy-supportive intervention program (ASIP).

Findings

Findings show that (1) teachers can learn how to become more autonomy supportive and less controlling toward students, (2) students of the teachers who participate in ASIP report greater psychological need satisfaction and lesser need frustration, (3) these same students report and behaviorally display a wide range of important educational benefits, such as greater classroom engagement, (4) teachers benefit as much from giving autonomy support as their students do from receiving it as teachers show large postintervention gains in outcomes such as teaching efficacy and job satisfaction, and (5) these ASIP-induced benefits are long lasting as teachers use the ASIP experience as a professional developmental opportunity to upgrade the quality of their motivating style.

Originality/value

Our ASIP helps teachers learn how to better support their students’ autonomy during instruction. The value of this teaching skill can be seen in teachers’ and students’ enhanced classroom experience and functioning.

Details

Motivational Interventions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-555-5

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Book part
Publication date: 2 November 2009

Jeffrey R. Dudas

Scholars increasingly recognize the centrality of legal ideas and language to the political vision that inspires American conservatism. However, relevant studies have been…

Abstract

Scholars increasingly recognize the centrality of legal ideas and language to the political vision that inspires American conservatism. However, relevant studies have been limited to the discursive practices that motivate conservative activism at the grass-root level. Exploration of the legal discourses employed by prominent public officials thus carries significant scholarly potential. For example, this chapter's investigation of President Ronald Reagan reveals that his political vision was suffused with legal discourse. Reagan's legal discourse, moreover, has exerted constitutive effects both on American conservatism and on the form and substance of a great deal of contemporary American public policy.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-616-8

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2012

Gwen C. Marchand and Kayana Sanders

Few studies in K-12 education have investigated the impact of changing schools during the academic year, or within-year transitions, on student motivation and achievement…

Abstract

Few studies in K-12 education have investigated the impact of changing schools during the academic year, or within-year transitions, on student motivation and achievement. Yet, many students face this type of transition, including children from low-income families living in urban areas, students from migrant worker and military families, and students with chronic behavioral problems. The evidence that does exist suggests that when students move between schools during the academic year, they may struggle with academic learning, behavior in school, and social interactions. This chapter approaches within-year academic transitions as a developmental context for student motivation. Drawing upon general systems theories and a specific theory of motivational development, the within-year transition is presented as an environmental demand that may lead to changes in student motivation and shifts in classroom actions, such as engagement. Continuity of subject learning and the formation of relationships are discussed as two challenges to student adjustment over the transition period. Student social and personal resources during the transition period are important factors in determining how a student adapts to a new school in the face of these challenges. Several methodological hurdles and possible approaches to conducting research in this area are discussed, as well as topics in need of additional research in this empirically overlooked area. The chapter concludes with suggestions drawn from the research literature as to how districts, schools, and classroom teachers can help support students transitioning between schools within the academic year.

Details

Transitions Across Schools and Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-292-9

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Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2010

Julianne C. Turner

Translating motivational research to classroom instruction may be so difficult because the two enterprises of psychological research and teaching are inherently different…

Abstract

Translating motivational research to classroom instruction may be so difficult because the two enterprises of psychological research and teaching are inherently different in goals and assumptions. Whereas psychological theory is meant to be broad and generalizable, educational practice must attend to individual and situational differences. For instance, a great deal of research suggests that mastery goal structures are related to desirable beliefs and behaviors. However, knowing that this is so does not help teachers know how to foster mastery goals in their classrooms and whether or how practices might vary given differences among students, developmental levels, and content areas. As Patrick (2004) noted, the theoretical notion of mastery goal structure as it is currently conceptualized was not developed in classrooms and does not address how a mastery goal structure is either manifested or communicated to students. Although it makes theoretical sense to provide “appropriate challenge” to students, how a teacher adapts that principle to students with a range of abilities and attitudes, from challenge seekers to avoiders, is not obvious. Research can provide only a general theoretical heuristic for understanding tendencies and does not necessarily explain individuals' behavior over time (Turner & Patrick, 2004). For motivational research to be meaningful and useful to educators, it needs to help them interpret student behavior as specific responses to specific sets of circumstances. Pajares (2007) expressed this well when he noted:Research findings … drawn from educational psychology broadly, and motivation theory and research in particular are bounded by a host of situated, cultural factors that must be attended to if the constructs themselves are to have any, as William James (1907/1975) termed it, practical, or cash, value. (p. 30)Therefore, in its present form, theory may not appear useful to teachers because of its seeming lack of specificity. These issues apply to all current theories of motivation.

Details

The Decade Ahead: Applications and Contexts of Motivation and Achievement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-254-9

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