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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Kofi Koranteng Adu and Patrick Ngulube

The purpose of this paper is to examine digital preservation of e-government in Ghana under the research question: what are the current digital preservation strategies…

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1066

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine digital preservation of e-government in Ghana under the research question: what are the current digital preservation strategies being deployed across the ministries and agencies in Ghana?

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by a conceptual framework, underpinned by a quantitative approach, the paper uses the survey approach, to address the digital preservation strategies deployed across public sector organisations in Ghana. It underscores the link between the conceptual framework and the literature to analyse the various digital preservation strategies.

Findings

Backup strategy, migration, metadata and trusted repositories were noted as the most widely implemented preservation strategies across the ministries and agencies. On the other hand, cloud computing, refreshing and emulation were the least implemented strategies used to address the digital preservation challenges.

Research limitations/implications

The paper adds to the existing conceptual underpinnings that have dominated the debate about data management, archival storage, preservation strategies, challenges and best practices of digital preservation of e-government.

Originality/value

This study draws its originality from the evidence of studies on digital preservation in Ghana as most studies have rather focussed on the preservation of documentary heritage, preservation and security of microfilms, preservation practices in the public records (Akussah, 2002; Ampofo, 2009; Festus, 2010). The emergence of this study addresses the knowledge gap in the preservation of digital records in a country where little attention has been accorded to digital preservation. The study also feeds into Ghana’s vision 2020 and the information communication technology policy document of the ministry of communication which aims at ensuring that Ghanaians have access to information and communication technology products and services.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Edward Asante and Patrick Ngulube

The purpose of this study is to investigate the critical success factors for total quality management implementation and implications for sustainable academic libraries in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the critical success factors for total quality management implementation and implications for sustainable academic libraries in Ghana. This study is part of a PhD project that focussed on selected technical university libraries in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a quantitative approach to collect the data. Samples of 124 participants were involved in this study. PLS-SEM (Smart PLS3) software was used to analyse the data. Convergent, discriminant validity assessment was computed. Eight variables of critical success factors were tested in relation to total quality management implementation at selected academic libraries in Ghana.

Findings

This study established that out of the eight variables tested, six of them (i.e. top management commitment, employee innovation employee training, organisational culture, teamwork and effective communication, quality performance) indicated a significant positive relationship with total quality management implementation apart from strategic planning and human resource management.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to eight variables as the critical success factors mentioned in the previous paragraph. The use of one methodology might be a limitation as the use of multimethod might have given a more comprehensive picture than the case. This study was limited to only technical university libraries in Ghana hence caution must be exercised when applying the results to contextually different academic environments. The results are applicable to academic universities library in Ghana and beyond if they are adjusted to suit the context.

Practical implications

This study is timely as it may lead to effective total quality management implementation and the sustainability of technical university libraries in Ghana and Africa in general.

Originality/value

The proposed model can be used to enhance the smooth implementation of total quality management in academic libraries in general and Ghana in particular. The framework is termed as Eddie and Pat's Achievement of Quality Performance (EPAfQP) model.

Details

Library Management, vol. 41 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Janette Raubenheimer and Patrick Ngulube

The purpose of this paper is to gain original evidence of the perception of Open Distance Learning (ODL) library middle managers towards the meaning of career success from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain original evidence of the perception of Open Distance Learning (ODL) library middle managers towards the meaning of career success from the perspective of the individual.

Design/methodology/approach

This quantitative research study was conducted with the help of a survey questionnaire designed by the first researcher.

Findings

Results revealed that career success no longer only relates to criteria such as the hierarchical position or progression through high ratings obtained during performance appraisal. A high premium is placed by ODL library middle managers on other success criteria identified in the literature, such as the positive effect of their work on the institution, success achieved through a focus on work life and home life balance and personal recognition due to competence.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings presented in this paper form an important part of a comprehensive study on ODL library middle management development but is limited to the only ODL library in South Africa.

Practical implications

The paper provides current perceptions of ODL library middle managers to be considered during career path planning.

Originality/value

The paper provides the first findings of an overview of the perception of South African ODL library middle managers towards the meaning of career success. The study is timely as the number of ODL institutions is growing. The target population to benefit from this study is ODL library practitioners.

Details

Library Management, vol. 40 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Patrick Ngulube

This paper is a report of a study that looks at the practice of records management in the public sector in Zimbabwe and the extent to which records management, within…

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2965

Abstract

This paper is a report of a study that looks at the practice of records management in the public sector in Zimbabwe and the extent to which records management, within Zimbabwe, can be regarded as a profession. The study reveals that records are mishandled and abused suggesting a lack of ethics. Those with the job title records manager have neither specialized training nor a code of ethics. The conclusions drawn are that, in Zimbabwe, records management has not yet been professionalized. The paper then suggests that the adoption of a code of ethics might lead to the professionalization of records management.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2019

Cleophas Mutundu Ambira, Henry Nyabuto Kemoni and Patrick Ngulube

This paper is based on the doctoral study conducted in 2016 at the University of South Africa. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the current state of…

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2152

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is based on the doctoral study conducted in 2016 at the University of South Africa. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the current state of management of electronic records in Kenya facilitates or undermines implementation of e-government with a view to develop a best-practice framework for management of electronic records in support of e-government.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the interpretive research paradigm and adopted qualitative research methodology using phenomenological design. Maximum variation sampling was used to identify the research sample for the study.

Findings

The findings established that the general status of management of e-records (MER) in government ministries is inadequately positioned to support e-government; use of e-government in Kenya had grown significantly and more ministries were adopting e-government services; although some initiatives have been undertaken to enhance MER, the existing practices for MER require improvement to ensure they adequately support e-government.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations were access to respondents and the challenge of self-reported data.

Practical implications

Recommendations and a best-practice framework for managing electronic records in support of e-government have been provided. A proposal for implementation of the recommendations on a priority basis has also been provided.

Social implications

The study’s contribution to scholarly works and literature in the field resides in its findings and a framework that can be practically adopted for management of e-records in support of e-government. By establishing the nexus between management of e-records and e-government in Kenya, it is hoped that it will provide input to policymakers to consider records managers as key stakeholders in e-government.

Originality/value

The originality of this study stems from two aspects: original topic and understudied area.

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Smangele P. Moyane, Luyanda Dube, Ntando Nkomo and Patrick Ngulube

This study examined the extent to which public academic libraries in South Africa coped with the changing information environment by using competitive intelligence (CI) to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the extent to which public academic libraries in South Africa coped with the changing information environment by using competitive intelligence (CI) to attain competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted positivism as the main philosophical lens and also incorporated qualitative elements to augment the quantitative data through a survey research design. Questionnaires were e-mailed to 25 directors of public academic libraries in South Africa and 17 were returned, yielding a 68% response rate. Attempts were made to reach to the 25 directors through semi-structured telephonic interviews, and only eight responded some through their representatives, yielding a 32% response rate. Using two instruments permitted the triangulation of data. A noted limitation of the study is that some library directors neither responded to the questionnaire nor the interview.

Findings

Findings revealed that various competitive intelligence techniques were employed; however, their implementation was not formalised. Competitiveness was driven by various factors such as rivalries in the information value chain; relevance; financial and budgetary constraints; changing user expectations and evolving technology.

Originality/value

This study is novel because there is a dearth of literature on implementation and use of competitive intelligence in academic libraries in South Africa.

Details

Library Management, vol. 41 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Patrick Ngulube

This article gives an overview of education and training of records managers in anglophone Africa and then focuses on standards for training of archivist and records…

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1617

Abstract

This article gives an overview of education and training of records managers in anglophone Africa and then focuses on standards for training of archivist and records managers. Using South Africa’s National Qualifications Framework and the South African Qualifications Authority guidelines, a training model that can be used elsewhere in Africa with some adjustments is suggested. The article recognises that there can be no one set of universally standard desirable outcomes for all educational institutions, as the outcomes must depend on the institution’s nature and mission. Whilst the teaching and learning processes may differ between countries, there should be a substantial commonality in the outcomes achieved. Thus it would be possible to have generic processes of assessment and accreditation. Adherence to standards is key to the generic process of accreditation and professional mobility.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Edda Tandi Lwoga, Christine Stilwell and Patrick Ngulube

The purpose of this study is to assess access to and use of agricultural knowledge and information in the rural areas of Tanzania.

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3119

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess access to and use of agricultural knowledge and information in the rural areas of Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed quantitative, qualitative and participatory methods were deployed. Semi‐structured interviews were used to collect qualitative and quantitative data from 181 farmers in six districts of Tanzania. Focus groups and participatory techniques (i.e. information mapping and linkage diagrams) were also used to collect qualitative data from 128 farmers in the same districts.

Findings

The results showed that deep, rich and complete data can be collected through the mixed quantitative, qualitative and participatory techniques. The findings demonstrated that the knowledge and information needs, and information‐seeking patterns of farmers were location specific. The major sources of information for farmers were predominantly local (neighbours, friends and family), followed by public extension services. Apart from radio and cell phones, advanced technologies (i.e. internet and e‐mail) and printed materials were used at a low rate despite their existence in the communities.

Research limitations/implications

The study necessitates a need to conduct regular studies on information needs, map communities' knowledge and information sources, create awareness of information sources and knowledge culture, use participatory methods in design and development of technologies and use multiple sources of knowledge and information (such as print and technologies) to deliver relevant information to farmers.

Originality/value

The study provides a deep understanding of access to and use of agricultural knowledge and information in the rural areas, which necessitates a need for demand‐led and client‐based knowledge and information services in order to meet the disparate farmers' needs. These findings can serve as an example for the increasing use of mixed quantitative, qualitative and participatory methods in information behavior research.

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Article
Publication date: 29 September 2020

Dennis N. Ocholla

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 41 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Dennis N. Ocholla

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 39 no. 6-7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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