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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Patrick Murray

Offers an argument, to be put to prospective clients, for greateruse of outplacement and career counselling services. Putsoutplacement/careers counselling into the context…

Abstract

Offers an argument, to be put to prospective clients, for greater use of outplacement and career counselling services. Puts outplacement/careers counselling into the context of change, where the development needs of the individual are being met by both government and industry. Suggests a way that outplacement/careers counselling services can become a key part of government strategy.

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Employee Councelling Today, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2017

Samuel A. Chambers

The labor theory of value (LTV) offers a lucid and forceful example of a “theory” thought to stand outside “history.” Considered as an “objective” form of theorizing, the…

Abstract

The labor theory of value (LTV) offers a lucid and forceful example of a “theory” thought to stand outside “history.” Considered as an “objective” form of theorizing, the LTV seeks transhistorical truths about the relationship between humans and nature – whereby, as everyone knows, value in the world is produced by the fundamental force of human labor power. Marx is typically taken to have subscribed to some form of the LTV, and thus to have signed on to this form of theorizing. This article refuses to treat Marx as an analytic, ahistorical theorist who would either affirm or deny the LTV. Rather, I read Marx as a genealogist who excavates the story of labor and value within the specific historical context of an emerging capitalist social formation. This genealogical approach to Marx, and particularly to his less-often-discussed, Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, shows plainly that Marx never subscribed to the LTV, but more importantly that he eschewed the form of theory that the LTV presumes. Rather than seeking to make transhistorical theoretical claims about the relation between labor and value, Marx meant to demonstrate to his readers something about the way in which a definite and concrete (historically situated) capitalist social formation establishes value. A capitalist social formation establishes its own specific value relations, by first constituting, and then dissimulating, a link between labor and value.

Details

International Origins of Social and Political Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-267-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Saleh Saafin

The aim of this descriptive study is to identify Arab tertiary students’ perceptions of the qualities and practices of teachers whom they judge to be effective. The data…

Abstract

The aim of this descriptive study is to identify Arab tertiary students’ perceptions of the qualities and practices of teachers whom they judge to be effective. The data was collected from 136 Arab freshman students attending the intensive English program in the University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to prepare them for their career programs. A content analysis of the data revealed a set of perceived characteristics and practices that were ranked according to their frequency rate. These results show that although teachers’ ability to teach and help students understand are seen to be essential, certain human aspects of teachers and their attitudes toward their students are seen as crucial for judging their effectiveness. These Arab students considered the human element of their teachers as a very important component of their effectiveness.

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Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1952

OUR readers do not need the reminder that 1952 is the 75th year of Library Association history. Some opportunity may be found at the Bournemouth Conference to celebrate…

Abstract

OUR readers do not need the reminder that 1952 is the 75th year of Library Association history. Some opportunity may be found at the Bournemouth Conference to celebrate this fact, in however modest a manner. The American Library Association, older by a year, celebrated its anniversary at Philadelphia last October, on which occasion Mr. F. G. B. Hutchings represented this country and spoke at a luncheon meeting to three hundred of the guests with acceptance. That celebration, however, appears to us to have been most significant for the comment on the Carnegie library gifts which was made by Mr. Ralph Munn, librarian of Pittsburgh Carnegie Library, in some ways the most spectacular one founded by the great Scot. Munn said:—

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New Library World, vol. 53 no. 20
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Thomas M. Jeannot

Reflecting on “The Rehabilitation of Karl Marx” as a theoretical economist 100 years after his death, Robert Paul Wolff, on the way to writing Understanding Marx, noted…

Abstract

Reflecting on “The Rehabilitation of Karl Marx” as a theoretical economist 100 years after his death, Robert Paul Wolff, on the way to writing Understanding Marx, noted that Marx had written, “at a conservative estimate, five thousand pages of theoretical material”. Therefore, in order to understand Marx's theoretical achievement, which Wolff compares with Darwin, Freud and Einstein (p. 714), “The simplest sort of common sense demands that we estimate Marx's place in the intellectual history of our civilization on the basis of this mass of economic theory” (p. 713). In addition to the three volumes of Capital, the three volumes of the Theories of Surplus Value, the Grundrisse, and the Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, however, “Marx also wrote, as a young man, a handful of exuberant, obscure, derivative, romantic reflections on the human condition…The same sort of common sense dictates that we not construe these youthful speculations as the final utterances of the true Marx” (p. 713). With these assertions, Wolff is reviving an old issue, for the benefit of a “modern mathematical reinterpretation of Marx” (pp. 715–16), that some had thought was laid to rest by the widespread availability of the Grundrisse.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1914

At a recent meeting of the Council of the Royal Borough of Kensington, Councillor R. DUDLEY BAXTER, Chairman of the Public Health Committee, brought up a report setting…

Abstract

At a recent meeting of the Council of the Royal Borough of Kensington, Councillor R. DUDLEY BAXTER, Chairman of the Public Health Committee, brought up a report setting forth, inter alia :—

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British Food Journal, vol. 16 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2018

Benjamin Cohen, Kira T. Lawrence, Andrea Armstrong, Miranda Wilcha and Alexa Gatti

A coalition of students, professors, administrators and operational staff at Lafayette College designed an environmental module to integrate in-class curricular education…

Abstract

Purpose

A coalition of students, professors, administrators and operational staff at Lafayette College designed an environmental module to integrate in-class curricular education with out-of-class environmental engagement. The purpose of this study was to improve the ethos of sustainability across campus.

Design/methodology/approach

The research reported here draws from qualitative and quantitative assessments to corroborate previous evidence that institution-wide collaboration is a necessary prerequisite for the successful development of such environmental campus programming.

Findings

It adds to those prior conclusions with the finding that three intertwined factors are critical keys to success. One is attention in the design process to coalition building between the academic, administrative and operational units of campus; second is a strong focus on organizational capacity; and third is explicit attention to preparing long-term management.

Practical implications

The particularities of college campuses, where student residence is temporary while the campus environment is continuous, require attention to organizational sustainability as much as the more common technical features of sustainability (e.g. energy, water, food, transportation systems, etc.). For small colleges seeking to implement similar programming to foster a culture of sustainability on their campuses, that commitment to organizational sustainability demonstrates that maintenance, durability and invested personnel are essential factors when similarly seeking interdisciplinary environmental education initiatives.

Originality/value

This paper describes the original program structure of Greening Lafayette. The program was built on the campus of Lafayette College through specific co-curricular, administrative, academic and facilities efforts. The paper details the approach Lafayette College students and faculty took to draw from best practices in campus sustainability, analyze their campus’ baseline engagement in and awareness of sustainability and leverage their college’s structures to design a program that generates a campus ethos of sustainability. It further elucidates the importance of ensuring the organizational sustainability of the program itself. While Greening Lafayette was designed for the context of a specific undergraduate campus, the program offers a model for faculty, students and administrators of other colleges and universities to build coalitions, design sustainability programming and develop an ethos of sustainability on their campuses.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Chi‐nien Chung

In this paper, I demonstrate an alternative explanation to the development of the American electricity industry. I propose a social embeddedness approach (Granovetter…

Abstract

In this paper, I demonstrate an alternative explanation to the development of the American electricity industry. I propose a social embeddedness approach (Granovetter, 1985, 1992) to interpret why the American electricity industry appears the way it does today, and start by addressing the following questions: Why is the generating dynamo located in well‐connected central stations rather than in isolated stations? Why does not every manufacturing firm, hospital, school, or even household operate its own generating equipment? Why do we use incandescent lamps rather than arc lamps or gas lamps for lighting? At the end of the nineteenth century, the first era of the electricity industry, all these technical as well as organizational forms were indeed possible alternatives. The centralized systems we see today comprise integrated, urban, central station firms which produce and sell electricity to users within a monopolized territory. Yet there were visions of a more decentralized electricity industry. For instance, a geographically decentralized system might have dispersed small systems based around an isolated or neighborhood generating dynamo; or a functionally decentralized system which included firms solely generating and transmitting the power, and selling the power to locally‐owned distribution firms (McGuire, Granovetter, and Schwartz, forthcoming). Similarly, the incandescent lamp was not the only illuminating device available at that time. The arc lamp was more suitable for large‐space lighting than incandescent lamps; and the second‐generation gas lamp ‐ Welsbach mantle lamp ‐ was much cheaper than the incandescent electric light and nearly as good in quality (Passer, 1953:196–197).

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Juliet L. Hardesty

– This case study describes Indiana University Libraries' use of Omeka for online exhibits of digital collections.

Abstract

Purpose

This case study describes Indiana University Libraries' use of Omeka for online exhibits of digital collections.

Design/methodology/approach

Omeka is placed in the context of other online exhibit tools being used by galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAM).

Findings

Omeka provides many benefits for different types of digital library collection exhibits and different levels of technical expertise but is currently limited in the ability to manage multiple exhibits of separate digital collections.

Originality/value

Describing Omeka in the context of other online exhibit tools shows the need for this kind of evaluation to improve these tools for the GLAM community.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Oluwatoyin Olubiyi, Anne Futterer and Christina D. Kang-Yi

The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively identify and synthesize the mental health care provided through diverse community schools implemented in the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively identify and synthesize the mental health care provided through diverse community schools implemented in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Using PubMed, community school model websites and Google Search, we identified 21 community school models that publicly reported outcomes and conducted full review of these models. The authors also conducted e-mail and telephone communication with ten program directors and evaluators to gain insights into successes and lessons learned through implementing community school models based on community partnership.

Findings

Provision of mental health care though community schools leads to reducing school suspensions, disciplinary referrals, problem presentation, and risk behaviors, and improving school grades, personal responsibility, future aspiration, and family engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Developing standardized outcome measure for the evaluation of mental health care provided through community school models is important to establish evidence that leads policymakers and practitioners into action. Information toolbox to guide mental health administrators and practitioners about future funding and partnership mechanisms for successful implementation and sustained mental health care through community school models can be useful.

Originality/value

This systematic literature review provides insights into the current practice and future direction in the provision and evaluation of mental health care through community school models and addresses concrete research and practical implications to guide mental health professionals.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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