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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Patrick Masson and Ken Udas

The purpose of this paper is to show that pointing to patterns of change in the adoption and institutionalization of educational resources, the appropriateness of traditional

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that pointing to patterns of change in the adoption and institutionalization of educational resources, the appropriateness of traditional heavy and front‐loaded planning and management regimes is challenged in favor of alternative Agile Methods.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from the simple observation that the original introduction of Course Management Systems to support online learning was ad hoc and evolutionary, rather than planned at an enterprise level, the paper points to the conflict between, and offers a solution for, open and decentralized resources and traditional teaching, learning, support, and management. By developing a logic to decentralization, a number of managerial strategies to improve agility are provided that address the changing nature of the university from one fundamentally designed to control, to one positioned to influence and adapt under the assumptions of change.

Findings

It is found that many components of the university including teaching, learning content, learning design, content development and management, and core infrastructure are shifting from centralized to decentralized models, while current management and governance practices remain centralized resulting in lagging development and increased risk.

Originality/value

The connections made here open a dialog for challenging and changing traditional management and decision‐making approaches within the organization, to better account for the environment that decentralized systems create.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Michael Feldstein

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Abstract

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

In response to a growing industry trend to waterborne coatings and printing inks, The Mearl Corporation, New York, has introduced a new, water‐based, pearl paste dispersion called…

Abstract

In response to a growing industry trend to waterborne coatings and printing inks, The Mearl Corporation, New York, has introduced a new, water‐based, pearl paste dispersion called Mearlite Ultra Bright UWA.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2018

Paul A. Pautler

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the preferences and…

Abstract

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the preferences and ideology of the FTC’s leaders, developments in the field of economics, and the tenor of the times. The over-riding current role is to provide well considered, unbiased economic advice regarding antitrust and consumer protection law enforcement cases to the legal staff and the Commission. The second role, which long ago was primary, is to provide reports on investigations of various industries to the public and public officials. This role was more recently called research or “policy R&D”. A third role is to advocate for competition and markets both domestically and internationally. As a practical matter, the provision of economic advice to the FTC and to the legal staff has required that the economists wear “two hats,” helping the legal staff investigate cases and provide evidence to support law enforcement cases while also providing advice to the legal bureaus and to the Commission on which cases to pursue (thus providing “a second set of eyes” to evaluate cases). There is sometimes a tension in those functions because building a case is not the same as evaluating a case. Economists and the Bureau of Economics have provided such services to the FTC for over 100 years proving that a sub-organization can survive while playing roles that sometimes conflict. Such a life is not, however, always easy or fun.

Details

Healthcare Antitrust, Settlements, and the Federal Trade Commission
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-599-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Ivy S.N. Chen and Patrick K.O. Fung

This study aims to identify the types of relationships that intermediaries form with their suppliers and customers in the apparel supply chain and their implications for…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the types of relationships that intermediaries form with their suppliers and customers in the apparel supply chain and their implications for performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Cluster analysis was conducted on the supplier and customer relationships of 90 trade intermediaries in the apparel industry.

Findings

Three configurations were identified: moderately dependent relationships with suppliers and customers and moderate flexibility upstream; highly dependent relationships with suppliers and customers but low flexibility upstream; and relationships with suppliers and customers that are low in dependence. Performance of firms using these configurations differed. Firms that cultivated some dependence upstream and downstream performed best. Firms with highly dependent relationships with suppliers and customers but low flexibility upstream performed almost as well. This group was highly skilled in relationship management. Firms that maintained low dependence with suppliers and customers performed the worst.

Research limitations/implications

Findings were based on a limited sample of 90 firms. Relationship configurations may differ in other industries, e.g. car industry.

Practical implications

For a supply chain to be effective, firms need to consider how they structure the relationships along the supply chain to facilitate the flow of information, goods and resources.

Originality/value

Prior research has considered relationships as independent dyads. This study looks at tripartite relationships involving suppliers and customers in the supply chain.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Sharinne Crawford, Stacey Hokke, Jan M. Nicholson, Lawrie Zion, Jayne Lucke, Patrick Keyzer and Naomi Hackworth

The internet offers an opportunity for researchers to engage participants in research in a cost-effective and timely manner. Yet the use of the internet as a research tool…

Abstract

Purpose

The internet offers an opportunity for researchers to engage participants in research in a cost-effective and timely manner. Yet the use of the internet as a research tool (internet research) comes with a range of ethical concerns, and the rapidly changing online environment poses challenges for both researchers and ethics committees. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the key ethical issues of using the internet to recruit, retain and trace participants in public health research, from the perspectives of researchers and human research ethics committee (HREC) members.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with eight public health researchers and seven HREC members in Australia to explore the key ethical issues of using the internet to engage research participants.

Findings

The study identified commonalities between researchers and HREC members regarding the utility and ethical complexity of using the internet to recruit, retain and trace research participants. The need for guidance and support regarding internet research, for both groups, was highlighted, as well as the need for flexibility and responsiveness in formal ethical processes.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the understanding of how the internet is used to engage participants in public health research and the ethical context in which that occurs. Supporting the ethical conduct of internet research will benefit those involved in research, including researchers, HRECs, organisations and research participants.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1973

A.E. Day

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON would have delighted in the deep irony of his own idle words, penned in a letter to William Archer in October 1887. His early death in Samoa, itself a…

Abstract

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON would have delighted in the deep irony of his own idle words, penned in a letter to William Archer in October 1887. His early death in Samoa, itself a symbolic reflection of an incredibly romantic life, short but full of incident and perfectly constructed for journalistic highlighting, inspired a spate of fulsomely admiring biographical studies which at one time threatened to obscure his true talent. Essay upon essay, book after book, some merely appreciative, some approaching adulation, poured from the presses until literary criticism proper was engulfed in a myth of quite extraordinary dimensions.

Details

Library Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Markus Gerschberger, Ila Manuj and Patrick Freinberger

The purpose of this paper is to understand and measure empirically the objective and perceived dimensions of supplier-induced complexity in supply chains.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand and measure empirically the objective and perceived dimensions of supplier-induced complexity in supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

An equal-weight, complementary mixed-method approach is used to investigate supplier-induced complexity and understand its impact on outcomes. Initial qualitative research and extant literature review allowed the identification of supplier characteristics that add complexity to supply chains and development of four research hypotheses. Subsequently, quantitative analysis was used for testing the hypotheses.

Findings

The results suggest that supplier-induced complexity is related to adverse outcomes, and both perceived and objective dimensions of complexity are valuable in understanding and measuring supplier-induced complexity.

Research limitations/implications

This study employs a mixed-method approach to establish and test relationships among perceived and objective supplier-induced complexity, and their outcomes. The unit of analysis is the first-tier suppliers of one farm equipment manufacturing firm. This limits the generalizability of the results to similar industrial manufacturing firms.

Practical implications

This paper presents an approach to identify suppliers that add the highest levels of complexity to a supply chain and, thus, require closer monitoring. Specific supplier characteristics are identified for individual suppliers. Developing specific complexity-related measures helps better identify critical suppliers compared to traditional approaches (e.g. ABC analysis).

Originality/value

This paper contributes to supply chain management literature by comprehensively exploring supplier-induced complexity, incorporating the often-ignored perceived complexity dimension, and providing a managerially useful framework.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Ashlyn M. Jaeger

Purpose – Using elective egg and sperm freezing as a case to compare representations of men and women as agents of biological reproduction, this chapter aims to understand how…

Abstract

Purpose – Using elective egg and sperm freezing as a case to compare representations of men and women as agents of biological reproduction, this chapter aims to understand how gender and risk are co-produced in the context of new reproductive technologies (NRTs).

Methodology – Through a content analysis of newspaper articles published between 1980 and 2016 about egg and sperm freezing, the author traces how fertility risks facing men and women are portrayed in the media.

Findings – Candidates for egg freezing were portrayed in one of the three ways: as cancer patients, career women, or single and waiting for a partner. The ideal users of sperm freezing are depicted in primarily two ways: as cancer patients and as employees in professions with hazardous working conditions. Threats to future fertility for women pursuing careers uninterrupted by pregnancy and child-rearing and women seeking romantic partners are largely portrayed as the result of internal risks. However, threats to future fertility for men working in dangerous professions are largely portrayed as external to them.

Research Limitations – Race and class did not emerge as dominant themes in these data; given the lack of accessibility to NRTs by class and race, this silence must be interrogated by further research.

Value – By comparing the constructions of at-risk groups, the author argues the medicalization of reproduction is gendered as fertility risks portrayed in the media take on a different character between men and women. This research shows how the gendered construction of infertility risk reinforces normative expectations around child-rearing and perpetuates gender inequity in parenting norms.

Details

Childbearing and the Changing Nature of Parenthood: The Contexts, Actors, and Experiences of Having Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-067-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2024

Gemma Pearce and Paul Magee

A sense of collective free-thinking with tangible goals makes co-creation an enlightening experience. Yet despite the freedom and organic flow of the methodology, there remain…

Abstract

Purpose

A sense of collective free-thinking with tangible goals makes co-creation an enlightening experience. Yet despite the freedom and organic flow of the methodology, there remain barriers to deploying co-creation in the real-world context. The aim was to understand the barriers and solutions to co-creation, reflect on applying co-creation in practice and co-create an applicable framework for co-creation.

Design/methodology/approach

These reflections and conceptual developments were completed using a Participatory Action Research Approach through the co-creation of the Erasmus+ funded Co-creating Welfare course.

Findings

Results presented are centric to the experiences in the United Kingdom but led to application at an international level. Problem formulation led to solutions devised about who should co-create, what co-creation aims to achieve, how to receive management buy-in, co-creating beyond the local face to face context and evaluation.

Originality/value

The Three Co’s Framework is proposed using the outline of: Co-Define, Co-Design and Co-Refine. Those who take part in co-creation processes are recommended to be called co-creators, with less focus on “empowerment” and more about facilitating people to harness the power they already have. Utilising online and hybrid delivery methods can be more inclusive, especially in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The use of co-creation needs to be evaluated more moving forwards, as well as the output co-created.

Details

Health Education, vol. 124 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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