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Abstract

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Patrick Hennelly and Chee Yew Wong

The focus of this paper is to understand the initial formation of inter-firm relationship with the ultimate aim to form a long-term relationship in offshore-wind sector…

Abstract

Purpose

The focus of this paper is to understand the initial formation of inter-firm relationship with the ultimate aim to form a long-term relationship in offshore-wind sector. The research question is “How and why new inter-firm relationships are built in nascent industries with highly uncertain business environments?”

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal case studies of three pairs of new inter-firm relationships based on interviews and other archival data are analysed.

Findings

Not all new inter-firm relationships progressed to expansion stage, largely owing to incompatibility and uncertainty. In some cases incompatibility could be rectified by trust and sharing of information. High trust is required to move the relationship from awareness to exploration stage. Investment in R&D is required to move the relationship from exploration to expansion. Innovation complementarity is the key in OSW sector.

Practical implications

Provide insights into how new inter-firm relationships in OSW sector could fail or be built up. High trust at the beginning helps to lower risk and encourages further investment.

Originality/value

Inform inter-firm relationship theories under high market risk and political uncertainty, especially for OSW sector.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Rashid Mehmood, Royston Meriton, Gary Graham, Patrick Hennelly and Mukesh Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to advance knowledge of the transformative potential of big data on city-based transport models. The central question guiding this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance knowledge of the transformative potential of big data on city-based transport models. The central question guiding this paper is: how could big data transform smart city transport operations? In answering this question the authors present initial results from a Markov study. However the authors also suggest caution in the transformation potential of big data and highlight the risks of city and organizational adoption. A theoretical framework is presented together with an associated scenario which guides the development of a Markov model.

Design/methodology/approach

A model with several scenarios is developed to explore a theoretical framework focussed on matching the transport demands (of people and freight mobility) with city transport service provision using big data. This model was designed to illustrate how sharing transport load (and capacity) in a smart city can improve efficiencies in meeting demand for city services.

Findings

This modelling study is an initial preliminary stage of the investigation in how big data could be used to redefine and enable new operational models. The study provides new understanding about load sharing and optimization in a smart city context. Basically the authors demonstrate how big data could be used to improve transport efficiency and lower externalities in a smart city. Further how improvement could take place by having a car free city environment, autonomous vehicles and shared resource capacity among providers.

Research limitations/implications

The research relied on a Markov model and the numerical solution of its steady state probabilities vector to illustrate the transformation of transport operations management (OM) in the future city context. More in depth analysis and more discrete modelling are clearly needed to assist in the implementation of big data initiatives and facilitate new innovations in OM. The work complements and extends that of Setia and Patel (2013), who theoretically link together information system design to operation absorptive capacity capabilities.

Practical implications

The study implies that transport operations would actually need to be re-organized so as to deal with lowering CO2 footprint. The logistic aspects could be seen as a move from individual firms optimizing their own transportation supply to a shared collaborative load and resourced system. Such ideas are radical changes driven by, or leading to more decentralized rather than having centralized transport solutions (Caplice, 2013).

Social implications

The growth of cities and urban areas in the twenty-first century has put more pressure on resources and conditions of urban life. This paper is an initial first step in building theory, knowledge and critical understanding of the social implications being posed by the growth in cities and the role that big data and smart cities could play in developing a resilient and sustainable transport city system.

Originality/value

Despite the importance of OM to big data implementation, for both practitioners and researchers, we have yet to see a systematic analysis of its implementation and its absorptive capacity contribution to building capabilities, at either city system or organizational levels. As such the Markov model makes a preliminary contribution to the literature integrating big data capabilities with OM capabilities and the resulting improvements in system absorptive capacity.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Jagjit Singh Srai, Gary Graham, Patrick Hennelly, Wendy Phillips, Dharm Kapletia and Harri Lorentz

The emergence of distributed manufacturing (DM) is examined as a new form of localised production, distinct from previous manifestations of multi-domestic and indigenous…

Abstract

Purpose

The emergence of distributed manufacturing (DM) is examined as a new form of localised production, distinct from previous manifestations of multi-domestic and indigenous production.

Design/methodology/approach

Supply network (SN) configuration and infrastructural provisioning perspectives were used to examine the literature on established localised production models as well as DM. A multiple case study was then undertaken to describe and explore the DM model further. A maximum variation sampling procedure was used to select five exemplar cases.

Findings

Three main contributions emerge from this study. First, the research uniquely brings together two bodies of literature, namely SN configuration and infrastructure provisioning to explore the DM context. Second, the research applies these theoretical lenses to establish the distinctive nature of DM across seven dimensions of analysis. Third, emerging DM design rules are identified and compared with the more established models of localised production, drawing on both literature and DM case evidence.

Practical implications

This study provides a rich SN configuration and infrastructural provisioning view on DM leading to a set of design rules for DM adoption, thus supporting practitioners in their efforts to develop viable DM implementation plans.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the intra- and inter-organisational requirements for the emerging DM context by providing new perspectives through the combined lenses of SN configuration and infrastructural provisioning approaches.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Christina Öberg, Gary Graham and Patrick Hennelly

The smart city idea refers to new ways of organising city functions and urban life, which are believed to move production and consumption from global to local…

Abstract

Purpose

The smart city idea refers to new ways of organising city functions and urban life, which are believed to move production and consumption from global to local, manufacturing from competitive to collaborative, and business from a shareholder to a multiple-stakeholder point of view. Most previous research has focussed on the societal level of smart cities, while less seems to be known about the management of business as part of smart cities. The purpose of this paper is to present a literature review on the state of the art of management research on smart cities. The following research question is addressed: How has previous research captured the management of organisations in smart cities?

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review using the search term “smart city/cities” in research on business, management, and operational management was conducted for the purpose of capturing previous research. Findings were coded based on main ideas, central concepts, and theories, thematic content of the articles related to the main ideas underpinning smart cities (digitalization, urbanisation, and sustainability as antecedents, and local, collaborative and multiple-stakeholder manufacturing as indicators), and units of analysis.

Findings

The paper points to how most studies on the management of organisations as part of smart cities focus on sustainability and how digitalisation enables new businesses. Collaborative efforts are emphasised and the theoretical framing is fragmented. Issues related to the organising of business is also not problematised and the business network approach could, as discussed in the paper, provide valuable insights related to the collaborative efforts of organisations and the multiple-stakeholder perspective.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to capture and present an overview of previous research on the management of business as part of smart cities. Research on smart cities has focussed on the policy and societal levels, and so far there is a lack of problematisation on how organisations may act, and potentially change their way of acting, should smart cities become a reality.

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2018

Gary Graham, Laird Burns, Patrick Hennelly and Royston Meriton

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the sourcing process of the electric sports car sector is changing with respect to competitive advantage, required capabilities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the sourcing process of the electric sports car sector is changing with respect to competitive advantage, required capabilities and emerging opportunism.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study data collection covered the period from January till August 2017, which implies a total period of eight months. The empirical analysis implies a sequence of 20 conducted interviews with senior managers, team leaders and operational employees from various organizational departments and functions within Company A, various suppliers and experts from the automobile industry as well as primary and secondary literature.

Findings

This work makes a contribution to the operations capability literature. It highlights the important role that sourcing will play to achieving strategic advantage in the electric sports car segment. Four key operational capabilities are emerging in the operating model. The first links to “capacity” and the ability of suppliers to be locally based so that they can deliver high-quality products and services in the minimum time (optimizing the “time-value” configuration). The second is the “design” of the supplier network. The third relates to “supplier management.” Finally, the fourth capability relates to the ability of the firm to “integrate” and “align” their marketing and IT planning processes with their sourcing process.

Research limitations/implications

Throughout the adaption of a sourcing framework and its extension to consider operational capabilities, the authors have begun to answer the research question of how the sourcing process for the supply of new electric powertrain components is being transformed. These initial findings, the authors intend to expand with more advanced case study work with the firm that will involve empirical modeling of process efficiency and inventory management.

Practical implications

The work closes the gap regarding the need for practical application tools, designed for process managers, who are being confronted by turbulent, unpredictable and fast moving technological-driven market environments. Although the sourcing framework was developed to test the impact of the electric mobility trend, it can likewise be applied for the sourcing of components in other fast changing environments as well.

Social implications

The paper raises the issues of the social role of the smart city planners in providing city spaces to enable the servicing of electric vehicles and to assist their production by developing the skills, capacity and capabilities of local city populations which will be needed to sustain and scale up any locally based operating model of electric vehicle production and servicing.

Originality/value

Although much has been written about the technological challenges of electric vehicles and the rise of new entrants such as Tesla to challenge the dominance of the sports car manufacturer’s very little work to data have explored the business-to-business (B2B) dimensions. The focus has been largely with the business-to-consumers (B2C) market.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Ivan Snehota, Antonella La Rocca and Alexandra Waluszewski

Abstract

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

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