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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2020

Clare D'Souza, Vanessa Apaolaza, Patrick Hartmann and Andrew Gilmore

The purpose of this study is to develop and test a theoretical model of Fairtrade buying behavior that supports Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by addressing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop and test a theoretical model of Fairtrade buying behavior that supports Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by addressing the nexus between just-world beliefs, along with the normative influences, self-identity and altruistic values.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework on the influence of just-world beliefs for Fairtrade purchase intentions is proposed to analyze the role of just-world beliefs on the effects of normative influences and altruistic values for the intention to purchase Fairtrade products that support SDGs. These conceptualizations are empirically tested on a representative sample of 217 consumers.

Findings

Just-world beliefs play a central role in the purchase intention by having a direct effect on purchase intention and an indirect effect mediated by personal norms and self-identity. They partially mediate the effects of altruistic values and social norms on the purchase intention of Fairtrade products that support SDGs.

Originality/value

The research provides a better understanding of the influences of these contextual variables on ethical consumption and contributes to both the theory and practice of how businesses can achieve SDGs. The psychological rationale of just-world beliefs provides a new approach to marketing strategy and communication aimed at increasing purchase intention of Fairtrade products that support the fundamental goals of the UN sustainable development.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2020

Vanessa Apaolaza, Patrick Hartmann, Cristobal Fernández-Robin and Diego Yáñez

This paper aims to examine the effects of natural plants on satisfaction and loyalty in the hospitality servicescape and provides a theoretical framework explaining the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of natural plants on satisfaction and loyalty in the hospitality servicescape and provides a theoretical framework explaining the underlying processes.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental study (plants vs no-plants) was conducted in a restaurant with a sample of 119 individuals. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and bootstrapping moderated mediation analysis (Hayes, 2013).

Findings

The results of the study confirmed significant effects of indoor natural plants on consumers’ satisfaction and loyalty, mediated by the experiential value components of aesthetic value, service excellence and escapism. The absence of an interaction of these influences with consumers’ connectedness to nature indicates that the beneficial effects of indoor plants universally affect all individuals, independent of their personal degree of feeling connected with nature.

Practical implications

Indoor natural plants as ambient elements in restaurants can improve satisfaction and loyalty by enhancing the dimensions of aesthetics and escapism of the service experience, as well as the perception of service quality.

Originality/value

This is the first experimental study analyzing the effects of indoor plants on customer satisfaction and loyalty conducted in a real-life restaurant setting using actual plants. The findings contribute theoretically by providing an integrated conceptual model of the satisfaction and loyalty effects of atmospheric stimuli (i.e. plants) in the hospitality servicescape, which offers a process explanation based on the mediating influence of aesthetic value and the sequential mediations of aesthetic value → service excellence and aesthetic value → escapism.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Patrick Hartmann, Vanessa Apaolaza and Clare D’Souza

This paper aims to address the role of psychological empowerment in proenvironmental consumer behaviour, focussing on climate protection.

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2485

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the role of psychological empowerment in proenvironmental consumer behaviour, focussing on climate protection.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 analyses the interaction of the effects of psychological empowerment and personal norms on two environmental behaviours with a sample of 600 individuals drawn form a representative online panel of the Australian population. Study 2 addresses the reinforcing influence of empowerment with a quasi-experimental design comparing 300 consumers of green electricity with 300 conventional electricity clients.

Findings

Psychological empowerment moderates the effects of personal norms on climate-protective consumer behaviour in a value-belief-norm (VBN) framework. Personal norms have a stronger influence for consumers experiencing high psychological empowerment than for disempowered feeling consumers. Furthermore, psychological empowerment experienced as an outcome of actual proenvironmental behaviour mediates the relationship between prior climate protection and future climate-protective intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should focus on the experimental manipulation of psychological empowerment with communicational claims, studying how perceived empowerment can be enhanced.

Practical implications

To promote climate friendly products and behaviours, marketers should use communication claims aimed at enhancing consumer’s subjective experience of empowerment.

Social implications

Public policy aimed at climate protection should focus on consumer education increasing consumers’ awareness of their potential influence.

Originality/value

Psychological empowerment has not been studied previously as either an antecedent or outcome of proenvironmental behaviour. This is the first study to show that psychological empowerment moderates normative influences on climate-protective consumer behaviour. This research further reveals a novel behavioural reinforcement process, in which psychological empowerment intervenes as a behavioural outcome as well as an antecedent of climate-protective consumer behaviour. Findings contribute to the development of the VBN framework as well as to the consumer-empowerment perspective on proenvironmental behaviour.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Patrick Hartmann and Vanessa Apaolaza Ibáñez

To provoke thought, and perhaps responses, to a radical view of “green marketing” and its place in society.

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12882

Abstract

Purpose

To provoke thought, and perhaps responses, to a radical view of “green marketing” and its place in society.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is essentially an essay but, based on a careful review of the relevant literature, several empirical studies conducted by the authors themselves, and some practical experience in green marketing.

Findings

The key challenge for green marketers has been in the past and will be more so in the future to strengthen individuals' perception of the individual benefits to be gained from “going green” by adding more and stronger emotional values to green brands. Future green marketing research should extend its analysis to the emotional motivations and benefits associated with environmentally responsible consumption behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

This essay is not based on a specific empirical study; it expresses a personal point of view, albeit well grounded in theory and practice. Green branding is a promising topic for future research.

Practical implications

The propositions put and conclusions drawn can form the basis of a potentially valuable toolkit for those planning marketing and communication strategies for green products and services.

Originality/value

The role of emotional benefits, particularly those based on the hypothetical human affinity with nature, has scarcely been attended to until now, in the field of green marketing.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Patrick Hartmann and Vanessa Apaolaza‐Ibáñez

Given the observable increase in images of nature in advertising on a global scale, this study aims to ask whether such creative strategies should adapt imagery to the…

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2388

Abstract

Purpose

Given the observable increase in images of nature in advertising on a global scale, this study aims to ask whether such creative strategies should adapt imagery to the natural environment of the target audiences or could it be standardised globally.

Design/methodology/approach

Two samples of respondents living in different geographic locations with contrasted climates and natural environments were exposed to a set of experimental green advertisements visually featuring different categories of natural scenery and one urban landscape. Attitude towards each advertisement and emotional responses evoked by it were measured and compared across the range of stimuli and the two samples.

Findings

Results did not support either the hypothesis that individuals prefer advertisements showing the natural habitat in which they had grown up or the hypothesized universal preference for advertising imagery displaying savannah type landscapes. However, the observed preferences across both samples for advertisements featuring natural landscapes with abundant green vegetation and clear water are consistent with evolutionary psychology, which proposes that perception of beauty in a landscape is universal and hypothesizes preferences for landscapes with those characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

The study was experimental in nature and based on only two specific geographic locations, as well as on one product and experimental brand. Findings and conclusions must therefore be adopted with due caution. Future research should be conducted on a broader geographic scale, across a wider range of natural and cultural environments, and with a greater variety of products and brands.

Practical implications

Results discourage the adaptation of nature imagery to the geographic location of a target audience, and support a global strategy based on the standardised use of landscapes universally perceived to be beautiful, following the principles of environmental aesthetics.

Originality/value

This is the first study to apply evolutionary and environmental psychology to an investigation of the influence of a target audience's natural environment on its behavioural responses to natural imagery in advertising.

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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817

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The growing awareness worldwide of the need for us all to adopt sustainable behaviors has had, and continues to have, massive repercussions for all aspects of the way we live our lives. However, business organizations with genuine environmental credentials can achieve differentiation and competitive advantage.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Patrick Hartmann, Vanessa Apaolaza Ibáñez and F. Javier Forcada Sainz

Proposes a set of strategic options for green brand positioning, based either on functional brand attributes or on emotional benefits. The aim of the study is to test the…

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39081

Abstract

Purpose

Proposes a set of strategic options for green brand positioning, based either on functional brand attributes or on emotional benefits. The aim of the study is to test the suggested green positioning strategies against one another, assessing their effect on perceived brand positioning and brand attitude.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model of the dimensionality and attitudinal effects of green brand positioning was developed. Both suggested alternatives to green brand positioning, along with a combined functional and emotional strategy, were tested in an experimental online setting. The hypothesized model was tested in the scope of exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

Findings

Results indicate an overall positive influence of green brand positioning on brand attitude. Further findings suggest distinct functional and emotional dimensions of green brand positioning with the interaction of both dimensions in the formation of brand attitude. Highest perceptual effects were achieved through a green positioning strategy that combined functional attributes with emotional benefits.

Research limitations/implications

The measures used, while providing good reliability and validity, have their limitations, especially in the case of the emotional dimension of green brand associations. Future research should concentrate on the further development of the constructs used in the study, particularly that of the emotional dimension of green brand associations and replicate the study under “real‐life” conditions within different product categories and with a representative sample.

Practical implications

A well implemented green positioning strategy can lead to a more favourable perception of the brand, giving support to the green marketing approach in general. This study supports significant attitude effects of both functional and emotional green positioning strategies. Thus, brand managers should deliver emotional benefits through the brand, at the same time making sure that target groups perceive real environmental benefits.

Originality/value

Although green marketing has been an important research topic for more than three decades, hardly any research has been conducted that focuses specifically on green branding. This paper analyses the dimensionality of green brand positioning, offers green branding insight and suggests strategic tools for brand managers.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Downloads
300

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2020

Neha Dhruv Agarwal and V.V. Ravi Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the research which has been done during the past three decades on the topic of green advertising and identify gaps…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the research which has been done during the past three decades on the topic of green advertising and identify gaps for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology that has been adopted for analysis is two-pronged – the first being a literature review with tabulation of data using excel sheets and bar graphs and the second being a bibliometric review using the software VOSviewer. Both approaches analyze the number of citations, keywords, authors, journals and countries. A database of 113 articles from 1990 to 2020 is generated from Web of Science.

Findings

Major contributors to the topic of green advertising research have been identified. Thematic classification is created to understand the subtopics of green advertising. Under this classification, nine subtopics have been identified. Six core research gaps have been identified for future research in the area of green advertising.

Practical implications

The study helps identify where green advertising research is being conducted, its growth potential and future prospects. This research work will enable the industry to gain new insights into this emerging field of green advertising for incorporating the same in their advertising campaigns in view of growing consumer concerns on environment.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comprehensive overview of the current status of research in green advertising. The paper is unique as it is the only review on the topic of green advertising. Given the increasing trend of going green among consumers, the paper adds tremendous value to the field of green advertising.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2007

Abstract

Details

The Cyclic Nature of Innovation: Connecting Hard Sciences with Soft Values
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-433-1

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