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History of Education Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2019

John McMackin and Patrick Flood

The purpose of this paper is to propose a theoretical framework for the social pillar of lean (SPL), which is a neglected topic in the lean management literature.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a theoretical framework for the social pillar of lean (SPL), which is a neglected topic in the lean management literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first identify shortcomings in research on the SPL that are attributable to neglect of relevant perspectives in organisational research. The authors then present a theoretical case outlining the factors that should be considered in SPL research, how they relate to one another and how they should be integrated in future studies of lean change implementation.

Findings

The theoretical framework for the SPL proposes a categorisation of factors and their relationships across levels of analysis that are relevant to the SPL. The inclusion of previously neglected perspectives, such as the relational coordination theory, within this framework offers new insights and directions for research.

Practical implications

By emphasising relationships, the SPL framework sheds light on the scale and complexity of the management challenges involved in lean implementation.

Originality/value

The proposed framework promises to enhance the efficacy of lean research by focussing on factors, such as relationships, that are most relevant to lean implementation.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Janine Bosak, Steven Kilroy, Denis Chênevert and Patrick C Flood

The present study contributes to our understanding of how to curb burnout among hospital staff over time. The authors extend existing research by examining the mediating…

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Abstract

Purpose

The present study contributes to our understanding of how to curb burnout among hospital staff over time. The authors extend existing research by examining the mediating role of mission valence in the link between transformational leadership and burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-administered questionnaire data from employees in a Canadian general hospital (N = 185) were analyzed using a time-lagged research design to examine whether transformational leaders can increase employees' attraction to the organization's mission (i.e. mission valence) and in turn alleviate long-term burnout.

Findings

Structural equation modeling analysis demonstrated that transformational leadership (time 1) was negatively related to the burnout components of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization (time 2). Further, the results showed that mission valence mediated these relationships.

Practical implications

The study findings are important for managers and professionals as they identify transformational leadership as a potent strategy to alleviate employee burnout and clarify the process through which this is achieved, namely, by increasing mission valence.

Originality/value

To date, surprisingly little research has explored how transformational leadership influences followers' burnout. To address this issue, the present study examined the role of transformational leadership on staff burnout through the mechanism of increasing mission valence. Understanding how to mitigate burnout is particularly critical in health care organizations given that burnout not only negatively impacts employee wellbeing but also the wellbeing and quality of care provided to patients.

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Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Janine Bosak, Jeremy Dawson, Patrick Flood and Riccardo Peccei

Addressing the continuing productivity challenge, the purpose of this paper is to analyze data from the National Health Service on employee involvement (EI) in order to…

Abstract

Purpose

Addressing the continuing productivity challenge, the purpose of this paper is to analyze data from the National Health Service on employee involvement (EI) in order to gain critical insights into how employees’ shared perception of EI in organizational decision making (i.e. EI climate) might address two persistent issues: how to enhance positive staff attitudes and improve organizational performance. In doing so, the authors respond to recent calls for more multilevel research and extend previous research on EI climate by attending to both EI climate level and EI climate strength.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 4,702 employees nested in 33 UK hospitals were used to test the moderating role of EI climate strength in the cross-level EI climate level employee level-attitudes relationship and in the organizational-level EI climate-organizational effectiveness relationship.

Findings

The results of the multilevel analyses showed that EI climate level was positively associated with individual-level employee attitudes (i.e. job satisfaction, organizational commitment). Further the results of the hierarchical regression analysis and the ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that EI climate level was also related to organizational effectiveness (i.e. lower outpatient waiting times, higher performance quality). In addition, both analyses demonstrated the moderating role of EI climate strength, in that the positive impact of EI climate level on employee attitudes and organizational effectiveness was more marked in the presence of a strong climate compared to a weak EI climate.

Practical implications

By creating and maintaining a positive and strong climate for involvement, hospital managers can tackle the productivity challenge that UK hospitals and health care institutions more generally are currently facing while improving the attitudes of their employees who are critical in the transformative process and ultimately underpin the organizational success.

Originality/value

This is the first study which provides evidence that favorable and consistent collective recognition of EI opportunities by staff contributes to enhance both employee attitudes and hospital performance. Results highlight the role of EI climate strength and underscore its importance in future research and practice.

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Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Rosemary Overell

In this chapter, the author considers how Melbourne’s grindcore metal scene produces itself as coherent, authentic and masculine through the discursive positioning of…

Abstract

In this chapter, the author considers how Melbourne’s grindcore metal scene produces itself as coherent, authentic and masculine through the discursive positioning of Sydney’s scene as lacking, inauthentic and feminine and/or homosexual. The way Melbourne scene-members talk about Sydney in ethnographic interviews and online, indicates how Melbourne’s grindcore scene identity rests on a particular striving towards – and fantasy of – a bounded, comprehensible masculine identity anchored in Symbolic/linguistic signifiers of homophobia. Building on my previous research on Melbourne’s scene, the author utilises a Lacanian perspective to argue that the masculinist talk of Melbournians works as a response to the affective experience of enjoying grindcore music. Here, the author departs from my earlier work, where the author used Deleuzian/Massumian understandings of affect to suggest that affect works to construct community belonging in grindcore scenes (2014). Instead, the author uses Lacan’s approach to affect to suggest that Melbourne grindcore fans construct their identity via furiously producing a fantasy of Sydney fans as ‘Other’. They Symbolically construct Sydney as a ‘cultural wasteland’ populated by ‘poofter[s]’ (Melbourne Grind Syndicate, 2016) who are imagined, and positioned as, inauthentic due to their affective enthusiasm for grindcore. Here, affect works to exclude and Other grindcore fans rather than as a force for collectivity.

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Australian Metal Music: Identities, Scenes, and Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-167-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

T.T. Selvarajan, Nagarajan Ramamoorthy, Patrick Flood and Peter Rowley

The objective of this research is to present a causal model of the influence of stock options on psychological contract and employee attitudes, and report results of an…

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2159

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this research is to present a causal model of the influence of stock options on psychological contract and employee attitudes, and report results of an initial empirical examination of this model.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the model, data were collected using a survey methodology from 98 employees in a large financial services firm. Multiple‐regression equations were used to derive the path coefficients.

Findings

The psychological contract variable of met expectations mediated the relationships between stock options and tenure intent and organizational commitment thus providing support for the intrinsic value model. Equity perceptions mediated the relationship between stocks exercised and met expectations. Equity perceptions, however, did not mediate the relationship between stock options and employee attitudes. Similarly, stock earnings also had a direct effect on external career intent indicating that employees who had exercised their stock options were looking for outside career opportunities contrary to our hypothesis.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should attempt to reconcile the intrinsic versus extrinsic value stock options may have on employee attitudes. These results should be considered tentative and interpreted with caution due to the cross‐sectional nature of data. The support for the intrinsic model suggests that organizations that use stock options may expect positive attitudes from their employees.

Originality/value

This is believed to be the first study that attempts to develop and test a causal model.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 26 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Patrick Flood and Thomas Turner

A feature of the industrial landscape in the 1990s is the emergenceof a growing number of non‐union companies. Numerous factors have beensuggested to explain this increase…

Abstract

A feature of the industrial landscape in the 1990s is the emergence of a growing number of non‐union companies. Numerous factors have been suggested to explain this increase such as an increasingly competitive product market; fear of unemployment; a shift in managerial attitudes towards trade unions and the use of human resource management policies which are inimical to unionism. However, the most comprehensive attempt to establish the factors which increase the probability of union avoidance among companies is to be found in the industrial relations literature in the USA. Based on a survey of Irish manufacturing companies, evaluates the explanatory framework which has emerged from this literature and concludes that its validity is questionable in an Irish context.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Na Fu, Qinhai Ma, Janine Bosak and Patrick Flood

Organizational ambidexterity enables firm to simultaneously exploit existing resources and explore new resources. It is associated with high levels of organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational ambidexterity enables firm to simultaneously exploit existing resources and explore new resources. It is associated with high levels of organizational performance. The purpose of this paper is to identify key internal management resources which contribute to building organizational ambidexterity. In particular, this study examines the impact of intellectual capital, i.e. human, social, and organizational capital, on organizational ambidexterity which in turn influences firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted within the context of professional service firms due to the importance of intellectual capital and organizational ambidexterity. Data were collected from 112 Chinese (cross-sectional design) and 93 Irish accounting firms (time-lagged design).

Findings

Results provide support for the linkage of intellectual capital to organizational ambidexterity and firm performance. Interestingly, findings are mixed regarding the impact of the three types of capital resources on organizational ambidexterity across both countries.

Practical implications

This study finds that various components of intellectual capital facilitate organizational ambidexterity which in turn improves firm performance. Therefore the authors provide managers with evidential support for the salience of intellectual capital in enabling organizations to simultaneously engage in exploiting existing resources while also exploring new ideas and opportunities.

Originality/value

This study is unique in that it highlights the importance of internal management resources in building up organization’s ambidexterity capability. The link between intellectual capital and organizational ambidexterity was established using a rigorous research design which has not been done before. It also emphasizes the role of people in leading to organizational effectiveness via developing organizational ambidexterity. Furthermore the evidence is gathered in two countries.

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Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Margaret M. Heffernan and Patrick C. Flood

This paper is developed from research conducted with the Irish Management Institute. A model is presented to illustrate the relationships between the adoption of…

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5181

Abstract

This paper is developed from research conducted with the Irish Management Institute. A model is presented to illustrate the relationships between the adoption of competency‐based human resource management and a range of other variables. These include HRM sophistication and several organisational characteristics. The linkages to business performance are also explored. The empirical evidence to validate this model was derived from a 114‐company respondent survey. Key findings are that organisational characteristics impact on the adoption of competencies, particularly company size and length of time in operation. Another finding is the effect of HR sophistication on the incidence of competency frameworks at company level. Organisations which already have sophisticated and well resourced HR processes in place are more likely to use competencies. The final finding relates to organisational performance. Organisations which are performing well are more likely to adopt competencies. This might also be interpreted as meaning that organisations which adopt competencies are more superior performers, although the cross‐sectional evidence presented here does not allow us to make this assertion with full confidence.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 24 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Na Fu, Qinhai Ma, Janine Bosak and Patrick Flood

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the indirect link between high-performance work systems (HPWSs) and firm performance in Chinese professional service…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the indirect link between high-performance work systems (HPWSs) and firm performance in Chinese professional service firms (PSFs) by investigating the mediating role of organizational ambidexterity, i.e. a firm’s capability to simultaneously explore new ideas and exploit existing resources.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 120 Chinese accounting firms. The authors used hierarchical and polynomial regression analyses to test their hypotheses.

Findings

The proposed positive link between the HPWS and organizational ambidexterity was found. Further, the results showed a non-linear relationship between organizational ambidexterity and organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The present study is limited in terms of small sample size, single industry and self-report data.

Practical implications

Firms which reported a higher level of HPWS demonstrated better performance due to their organizational capability to explore new ideas and exploit existing resources. In the Chinese context, firms that had high levels of exploration (exploring new resources) and exploitation (exploiting existing resources) or that had a high level of exploration experienced higher performance. The authors can conclude from these findings that without exploration, organizational success is difficult to achieve for PSFs.

Originality/value

This is the first study examining the underlying mechanism of organizational ambidexterity in the indirect relationship between HPWS and firm performance in Chinese PSFs. It advances the authors understanding of HPWS and firm performance relationship in an Eastern country and an emerging context of PSFs. This is also the first study to use polynomial regression to operationalize organizational ambidexterity.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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