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1 – 10 of 322
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Hannah Patrick, Paul Bolton and Karen Brickenden

Introduction Clinical Guidelines are systematically developed statements which assist clinicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate treatment for specific…

Abstract

Introduction Clinical Guidelines are systematically developed statements which assist clinicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate treatment for specific conditions. While there have been great expectations of improving clinical practice many criticisms of the process have been made:

Details

Journal of Clinical Effectiveness, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-5874

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1929

WE publish this issue on the eve of the Brighton Conference and our hope is that this number of The Library World will assist the objects of that meeting. Everything connected…

Abstract

WE publish this issue on the eve of the Brighton Conference and our hope is that this number of The Library World will assist the objects of that meeting. Everything connected with the Conference appears to have been well thought out. It is an excellent thing that an attempt has been made to get readers of papers to write them early in order that they might be printed beforehand. Their authors will speak to the subject of these papers and not read them. Only a highly‐trained speaker can “get over” a written paper—witness some of the fiascos we hear from the microphone, for which all papers that are broadcast have to be written. But an indifferent reader, when he is really master of his subject, can make likeable and intelligible remarks extemporarily about it. As we write somewhat before the Conference papers are out we do not know if the plan to preprint the papers has succeeded. We are sure that it ought to have done so. It is the only way in which adequate time for discussion can be secured.

Details

New Library World, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Charlotte Tye, Kandice Varcin, Patrick Bolton and Shafali Spurling Jeste

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disorder with a high prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet no single genetic, neurological or neurophysiological risk…

1119

Abstract

Purpose

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disorder with a high prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet no single genetic, neurological or neurophysiological risk marker is necessary or sufficient to increase risk for ASD. This paper aims to discuss the utility of adopting a developmental perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The increasing number of TSC infants presenting with abnormalities prenatally provides a unique opportunity to study risk pathways to ASD from birth. Here, the authors review findings to date that support the investigation of infants with TSC to further our understanding of typical and atypical development.

Findings

Evidence has accumulated from studies of infants at familial risk for ASD (“baby siblings”) to suggest that early markers of ASD are present in the first year of life. The early waves of prospective studies of infants with TSC indicate dynamic changes in developmental trajectories to ASD and are likely to provide insight into cascading effects of brain “insult” early in development. Emerging evidence of phenotypic and biological homology between syndromic and idiopathic cases of ASD supports the notion of a convergence of risk factors on a final common pathway in ASD.

Originality/value

The delineation of brain-based biomarkers of risk, prediction and treatment response in TSC will be critical in aiding the development of targeted intervention and prevention strategies for those infants at high risk of poorer developmental outcomes.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Broad Autism Phenotype
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-657-7

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

SHANTARAM P. HEGDE and SANJAY B. VARSHNEY

We argue that uninformed subscribers to an initial public offering (IPO) of common stocks are exposed to greater ex ante risk of trading against informed traders in the secondary…

Abstract

We argue that uninformed subscribers to an initial public offering (IPO) of common stocks are exposed to greater ex ante risk of trading against informed traders in the secondary market because the advent of public trading conveys hitherto private information and thereby mitigates adverse selection. The going‐public firm underprices the new issue to compensate uninformed subscribers for this added secondary market adverse selection risk. We test this market liquidity‐based explanation by investigating the ex‐post consequences of ownership structure choice on the initial pricing and the secondary market liquidity of a sample of initial public offerings on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Consistent with our argument, we find that initial underpricing varies directly with the ex post trading costs in the secondary market. Further, initial underpricing is related positively to the concentration of institutional shareholdings and negatively to the proportional equity ownership retained by the founding shareholders. Finally, the secondary market illiquidity of new issues is positively related to institutional ownership concentration and negatively to ownership retention and underwriter reputation. Thus, the evidence based on our NYSE sample supports the view that the entrepreneurs' choice of ownership structure affects both the initial pricing and the subsequent market liquidity of new issues.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Andrew N. Kleit and Dennis L. Weisman

Elaborates on forthcoming change in the US telecoms industry. Wonders how competitors will be allowed to compete. Urges that regulators must focus on protecting competition and…

Abstract

Elaborates on forthcoming change in the US telecoms industry. Wonders how competitors will be allowed to compete. Urges that regulators must focus on protecting competition and not competitors. In conclusion, reckons that consumers are best served by laws and regulations that protect the competitive process – not the competitors themselves.

Details

info, vol. 1 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2021

Patrick Hopkinson, Andrew Voyce and Jerome Carson

The purpose of this paper is to compare the stories of Syd Barrett musician, with Andrew Voyce, and their respective recovery journeys.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the stories of Syd Barrett musician, with Andrew Voyce, and their respective recovery journeys.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use collaborative autoethnography to share their own perspectives on Syd Barrett and to contrast his story with that of Andrew, a co-author.

Findings

Both Syd and Andrew experienced serious mental distress. While Syd had only limited contact with mental health services, Andrew’s contact was extensive, with a 20-year history of admissions and discharges. In the end, when the psychiatric services listened to Andrew’s concerns and acted on them, he was able to enter into the journey of recovery.

Research limitations/implications

The authors are restricted in the amount of available information on Syd Barrett, especially that related to mental health problems. The story of Andrew shows how recovery is possible even after years of serious mental illness.

Practical implications

Andrew’s story shows why professionals should never give up on people, with even the most seemingly severe and intractable problems. Could services have done more for Syd?

Social implications

Mental illness still attracts huge stigma. Today there is a much more open culture. Would Syd have come out about his own struggles with mental health had society been more open?

Originality/value

Bringing together two stories of mental distress enables the authors to explore the concept of recovery.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2023

Patrick Hopkinson, Mats Niklasson, Peter Bryngelsson, Andrew Voyce and Jerome Carson

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of the life of the musician Brian Wilson from five different perspectives.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of the life of the musician Brian Wilson from five different perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a mixed method of collaborative autoethnography, psychobiography and digital team ethnography to try and better understand the life and contributions of Brian Wilson.

Findings

Each of the five contributors provides different insights into the life and music of Brian Wilson.

Research limitations/implications

While the focus of this paper is on a single individual, a case study, the long and distinguished life of Brian Wilson provides much material for discussion and theorising.

Practical implications

Each individual presenting to mental health services has a complex biography. The five different contributions articulated in this paper could perhaps be taken as similar to the range of professional opinions seen in mental health teams, with each focusing on unique but overlapping aspects of the person’s story.

Social implications

This account shows the importance of taking a biological-psychological-social-spiritual and cultural perspective on mental illness.

Originality/value

This multi-layered analysis brings a range of perspectives to bear on the life and achievements of Brian Wilson, from developmental, musical, psychological and lived experience standpoints.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Patrick Hopkinson, Peter Bryngelsson, Andrew Voyce, Mats Niklasson and Jerome Carson

The purpose of this study is to mirror the late guitarist Peter Green’s life experiences through insights from Andrew Voyce, who recovered from mental illness, and expertise from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to mirror the late guitarist Peter Green’s life experiences through insights from Andrew Voyce, who recovered from mental illness, and expertise from Peter Bryngelsson, a Swedish professional musician and author.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a mixed method of collaborative autoethnography, psychobiography and digital team ethnography.

Findings

Despite having not previously attracted academic interest, Peter Green’s experiences of mental health problems and his return to recording and performance provide a rich data source when mirrored and compared to the lives and experiences of Andrew Voyce and Peter Bryngelsson.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this piece of work is that Peter Green died in 2020. During the process of writing, the authors have had to follow different, mostly unacademic, sources that have described various parts of Peter Green’s life. The authors have given examples and drawn conclusions from their own lives as well as from academic sources, which they have found appropriate.

Practical implications

Both Andrew Voyce and Peter Bryngelsson’s stories would be helpful when it comes to a deeper understanding as to why Peter Green “took a left turn”, i.e., turned his back on an accepted lifestyle.

Social implications

Acid casualty is a problem connected to both mental distress and to the music industry. Peter Bryngelsson’s story tells us that one can remain sane and drug free and still be an influential and creative musician.

Originality/value

The analysis has brought together two stories of mental distress in combination with insights.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2024

Patrick Hopkinson and Mats Niklasson

This paper aims to introduce International Digital Collaborative Autoethnographical Psychobiography (IDCAP).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce International Digital Collaborative Autoethnographical Psychobiography (IDCAP).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes how IDCAP was developed to answer research questions about what it takes and what it means to recover from mental illness. During its development, IDCAP combined the diverse and intersectional experiences, knowledge and interests of an Anglo-Swedish research team with what could be found in different publications concerning the experiences and the mental illnesses of the musicians Syd Barrett, Peter Green and Brian Wilson.

Findings

IDCAP combines features of autoethnography and psychobiography to offer a novel qualitative research method.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst IDCAP was created to focus on recovery from mental illness and musicians, it can be applied to other areas of research. It shares the same limitations as autoethnography and psychobiography, although some of the features of IDCAP may go some way to mitigate against these.

Practical implications

IDCAP is a novel research method that is offered to other researchers to develop and enhance further through application.

Social implications

IDCAP is a collaborative research method that encourages the involvement of a wide range of researchers from different countries and cultures. It can be used to give voice to marginalised groups and to counter discrimination and prejudice. Recovery from mental illness is a topic of great personal and social value.

Originality/value

IDCAP is a novel research method that, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, has not been explicitly used before.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

1 – 10 of 322