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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Juan Mundel, Patricia Huddleston, Bridget Behe, Lynnell Sage and Caroline Latona

This study aims to test the relationship between consumers’ perceptions of product type (utilitarian vs hedonic) and the attentional processes that underlie…

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1381

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the relationship between consumers’ perceptions of product type (utilitarian vs hedonic) and the attentional processes that underlie decision-making among minimally branded products.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses eye-tracking measures (i.e. total fixation duration) and data collected through an online survey.

Findings

The study shows that consumers spend more time looking at hedonic (vs utilitarian) and branded (vs unbranded) products, which influences perceptions of quality.

Practical implications

The findings of this research provide guidelines for marketing minimally branded products.

Originality/value

The authors showed that the product type influences the time consumers spend looking at an item. Previous findings about effects of branding are extended to an understudied product category (i.e. live potted plants).

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Patricia Huddleston, Linda K. Good and Leslie Stoel

Poland appears to be an attractive consumer market, based on strong demand for consumer products during the past several years. However, this may not be the case for…

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5602

Abstract

Poland appears to be an attractive consumer market, based on strong demand for consumer products during the past several years. However, this may not be the case for Western marketers, because of the influence of strong feelings of national pride on behavior of Polish consumers. Measures of consumer ethnocentrism may provide Western marketers with the information necessary to target consumers who do not allow nationalistic feelings to influence product quality evaluation and purchase behavior. Also, the necessity of the product to consumers may provide marketers with clues on which products will be accepted in the Polish marketplace. The purpose of this study is to learn, for various consumer products, whether Polish consumers’ perceptions of product quality differ based on consumer ethnocentric tendency, product necessity, and country of origin. A repeated measures ANOVA test provides empirical evidence that perceived quality differs by necessity, by product, by country, and consumer ethnocentrism influences quality perceptions of Polish consumers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Eunyoung (Christine) Sung and Patricia Huddleston

This paper explores the antecedents and consequences of consumers’ need for self-image congruence on their retail patronage of department (high-end) and discount (low-end…

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1502

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the antecedents and consequences of consumers’ need for self-image congruence on their retail patronage of department (high-end) and discount (low-end) stores to purchase name-brand products in two product categories, apparel and home décor. It also compared online to offline shopping and considered two mediator variables, frugality and materialism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzed the hypothesized relationships using structural equation modeling (SEM) and MANOVA. Study 1 suggested the model using secondary data, and Study 2 measured and confirmed the relationships using scenario-based online survey data. An MANOVA test was used to compare the shopping behavior of consumers with high and low need for self-image congruence.

Findings

A strong causal link was found between concern with appearance and need for self-image congruence, and a positive relationship between need for self-image congruence and high- and low-end retail store patronage offline and online. While the group with high (vs low) need for self-image congruence was more likely to patronize department stores, unexpectedly, both the high and low self-image congruence groups were equally likely to shop at discount stores.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that marketing messages focusing on concern for appearance may succeed by tapping into consumers’ need for self-image congruence with brand product/retail store images. Results also showed that consumers with high self-image congruence often patronize discount retail stores, suggesting marketing opportunities for low-end retailers.

Originality/value

Because consumers with high need for self-image congruence patronize both department and discount stores, it is suggested that self-image congruity may be multi-dimensional. The current study is also the first to examine structural relationships to test patronage behavior between department and discount stores offline and online.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Patricia Huddleston and Linda K. Good

Success of retail firms is dependent on a motivated workforce, yet little is known about what job characteristics motivate employees from former command economies…

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3505

Abstract

Success of retail firms is dependent on a motivated workforce, yet little is known about what job characteristics motivate employees from former command economies. Investigates 11 valent job motivators for Russian and Polish retail sales staff and their expectations of receiving these rewards. Retail sales managers rated the importance of these motivators to their employees. Data were collected in two Russian and two Polish cities. The most important motivators to Russian and Polish sales employees are pay and friendliness of co‐workers. In most cases, managers’ perceptions of job motivators were similar to their employees. The expectation of receiving incentives were measured and results show both Russian and Polish employees had significantly lower expectations of receiving all 11 job motivators relative to the importance they attached to them.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Rodney C. Runyan, Patricia Huddleston and Jane L. Swinney

The purpose of this paper is to describe a qualitative study of small retailers, designed to uncover perceptions of resources which may be utilized to create competitive…

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3615

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a qualitative study of small retailers, designed to uncover perceptions of resources which may be utilized to create competitive advantages and improve performance. The resource‐based view (RBV) of the firm has focused on large firms, and this study extends RBV to the small firm.

Design/methodology/approach

Using focus groups of small retailers within four communities in the USA, open‐ended questioning and discussions were utilized to help elicit responses about owner's resources.

Findings

The concepts of community brand identity, local social capital and environmental hostility (though not part of the original discussion guide), emerged as important constructs. Both community brand identity and social capital were articulated by focus group participants as resources which helped them to be successful. Brand identity was seen as important regardless of environment, while social capital emerged as a resource used more in hostile environments.

Research limitations/implications

Brand identity and social capital are non‐economic resources which may help small retailers to compete in increasingly competitive environments. The RBV holds that to provide a competitive advantage, a firm's resources must be valuable, rare, imperfectly mobile and non‐substitutable. This qualitative study supports the conceptualization of brand identity and social capital as such resources.

Practical implications

Small business owners need to recognize the value of non‐monetary resources. Once these are recognized they can then be leveraged by the business owner to improve performance.

Originality/value

Few studies exist which apply the RBV to small firms. Only recently have scholars begun to operationalize constructs of the RBV. Researchers have not investigated social capital or brand identity as mitigators of environmental hostility. This study addresses each of these issues.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Patricia Huddleston

Identifies the purpose of the study as gathering exploratory dataon organizational structure and product procurement process for Russianretail stores. Results came from…

Abstract

Identifies the purpose of the study as gathering exploratory data on organizational structure and product procurement process for Russian retail stores. Results came from conducting in‐depth interviews with six retail executives in Russia, in which respondents answered a series of open‐ended questions regarding organizational structure, product procurement procedures and demographics. Results highlighted similarities to product procurement processes used by large retail organizations in the USA. Concludes that the person responsible for “buying” merchandise is usually a female with a college education, in middle management, with five to ten years of previous retail experience. Finds that the “buyer” has the freedom to source approximately 25 per cent of the budget from small enterprises or foreign companies. Notes that a lack of convertible currency led to a dramatic decrease in the level of imported goods during the first eight months of 1991; and that goods are most frequently imported from the socialist countries of Eastern Europe. Expects changes in the product procurement process as a result of the dynamic economic environment.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Linda K. Good and Patricia Huddleston

Investigates ethnocentric tendencies of Polish and Russianconsumers and whether tendencies vary by country, demographiccharacteristics and store type (formerly state owned…

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3755

Abstract

Investigates ethnocentric tendencies of Polish and Russian consumers and whether tendencies vary by country, demographic characteristics and store type (formerly state owned or private). Examines whether ethnocentrism affects product selection decisions. Poles are significantly more ethnocentric than Russians. Ethnocentric Poles are older, more likely to be female, less educated, and have lower incomes than less ethnocentric consumers. For Russians, the more ethnocentric consumers are less educated. Degree of ethnocentrism is not related to purchase intention for Poles but is related for Russians. Consumers who shop at formerly state‐owned stores are significantly more ethnocentric than private store shoppers for both countries.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Susan J. Linz, Linda K. Good and Patricia Huddleston

Despite unanimous agreement in the existing literature that morale influences employee performance, no well‐defined measure of morale exists. In Russia, identifying the…

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4213

Abstract

Purpose

Despite unanimous agreement in the existing literature that morale influences employee performance, no well‐defined measure of morale exists. In Russia, identifying the factors that contribute to employee morale is particularly important since firms face difficult financial challenges imposed by the decade‐long economic and political transition that began in January 1992. The study aims to develop a robust measure of morale and focuses on the factors that influence morale among Russian workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from Russian employees at two different points in time, 1995 and 2002, in five Russian cities (Moscow, St. Petersburg, Taganrog, Rostov and Azov). The study used regression analysis to assess the influence of expected rewards on employee morale.

Findings

The paper finds that among the workers participating in the study, expectation of receiving a desired reward contributes to high morale, with expected monetary rewards having a higher influence that expected non‐monetary rewards, but praise for a job well done and a feeling of accomplishment also contribute positively to employee morale. There is a significant correlation between positive attitudes toward work and morale, and a positive correlation between performance assessment and morale. Demographic characteristics (age and gender) have no discernable influence on morale when controls are included for work experience.

Research limitations/implications

Data are cross‐sectional rather than longitudinal and sampling is purposive rather than random.

Practical implications

The research suggests that if companies are not financially able to provide monetary rewards, managers can focus on developing a work environment that is friendly and fosters mutual respect. Managers have control over praise and it costs nothing to praise employees for a “job well done.”

Originality/value

No study to date has examined Russian worker morale nor tested morale measures developed in developed market economies on Russian workers. The study develops three reliable measures of morale.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Patricia Huddleston, Judith Whipple, Rachel Nye Mattick and So Jung Lee

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast customer perceptions related to satisfaction with conventional grocery stores as compared to specialty grocery stores…

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10311

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast customer perceptions related to satisfaction with conventional grocery stores as compared to specialty grocery stores. The study examines store attributes of product assortment, price, quality, and service in order to determine which attributes have the greatest impact on store satisfaction for each store format.

Design/methodology/approach

A mail survey was sent to a sample of specialty and conventional grocery store customers. The ten state sample was drawn from US households located in postal (ZIP) codes in areas where national specialty stores (e.g. whole foods) were located.

Findings

Perception of satisfaction were higher among specialty grocery store customers compared to conventional grocery store customers. For both store formats, store price, product assortment, service and quality positively influenced satisfaction. Stepwise regression indicated that each store attribute contributed differently to store satisfaction for conventional and specialty store formats.

Research limitations/implications

The results demonstrate that price, product assortment, quality, and employee service influence store satisfaction regardless of store type (conventional stores or specialty stores). However, the degree of influence of these attributes varied by store type. The results imply that while specialty store shopper satisfaction characteristics are clearly delineated, conventional store shopper characteristics are more difficult to pinpoint. Research limitations include a sample that is more highly educated and has higher incomes than the average American household.

Originality/value

Despite the growth of new product categories and new industry players, few studies have investigated customer satisfaction within the retail food industry. Comparisons of specialty and conventional food stores are equally scarce.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Shih‐Mei Chen and Patricia Huddleston

The purpose of this paper is, first, to assess the influence of four promotional strategies on students' purchase intention for fair trade coffee; and second to examine…

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4094

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is, first, to assess the influence of four promotional strategies on students' purchase intention for fair trade coffee; and second to examine the effect of attractiveness and credibility of two university sports celebrities on purchase intention for fair‐trade coffee in a campus convenience store.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 100 college students at a mid‐western asked them to rate two campus sports celebrities on attractiveness, expertise, and trustworthiness and the relationship of these qualities to purchase intention for fair trade coffee. Influence of four promotional strategies on purchase intention was assessed.

Findings

There was a positive and significant relationship between attractiveness and trustworthiness of the sports celebrities and customers' purchase intention for fair‐trade coffee. However, a “buy one get one free cup coupon” stimulated higher purchase intention than sports celebrities, flyers, and packaging.

Research limitations/implications

Results are based on a student sample. Advertising stimuli were written scenarios with no illustrations.

Practical implications

Less expensive promotional strategies (e.g. coupons) rather than celebrity endorsements may be equally effective in eliciting purchase intention for fair trade products.

Originality/value

The paper is innovative in its examination of the effectiveness of promotional strategies (including sports celebrity influence) to promote fair trade products in a small business context.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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