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Article

Dorothy Tao and Patricia Ann Coty

Until the Loma Prieta earthquake of 17 October 1989, also known as the “World Series earthquake” or the “San Francisco earthquake,” many of us may have considered…

Abstract

Until the Loma Prieta earthquake of 17 October 1989, also known as the “World Series earthquake” or the “San Francisco earthquake,” many of us may have considered earthquakes a remote danger. But instantaneous television transmission from the interrupted World Series game and frightening images of the collapsed Cypress Viaduct and the burning Marina district transformed this incident from a distant disaster into a phenomenon that touched us all. The Loma Prieta earthquake was followed in December 1990 by the inaccurate but widely publicized New Madrid earthquake prediction. Despite its inaccuracy, this prediction alerted the public to the fact that the largest earthquake ever to have occurred in the United States occurred not in California or Alaska, but in Missouri, and that a large earthquake could occur there again. Americans are discovering that few places are immune to the possibility of an earthquake.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Esther G. Bierbaum

The academic library clings to its etymological roots; even a term such as “alternative materials” connotes print. Still, because of the recognition of recreational or…

Abstract

The academic library clings to its etymological roots; even a term such as “alternative materials” connotes print. Still, because of the recognition of recreational or instructional values, some audiovisual (AV) formats—traditionally, the sight‐sound media of film, recordings, and graphics— have become accepted (if not wholly embraced) in academic collections. Whether these nonprint materials are bibliographically and physically accessible is problematical: AV is often purchased from different budgets, housed separately, and indexed by a system different from that for the print collection. Nonprint also includes three‐dimensional objects (3D), materials equally useful as supplements to the printed page: a model, a simulation, the “real thing” itself. The literature indicates these materials are increasingly important in school and public library collections. We ask then, should objects be part of academic library collections, and what is the present status of these materials in academic libraries?

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Collection Building, vol. 10 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems…

Abstract

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems destined to replace the XT and AT models that are the mainstay of the firm's current personal computer offerings. The numerous changes in hardware and software, while representing improvements on previous IBM technology, will require users purchasing additional computers to make difficult choices as to which of the two IBM architectures to adopt.

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M300 and PC Report, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0743-7633

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