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Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

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Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2016

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Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2016

Abstract

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Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2016

Kathryn Goldman Schuyler

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Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

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Journal of Management History, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2016

Abstract

Details

Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

William Hemmig

Looks at the pathfinder approach to library instruction, which was developed in the 1960s by Patricia Knapp. Knapp's system focused, not on the simple provision of answers…

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3759

Abstract

Purpose

Looks at the pathfinder approach to library instruction, which was developed in the 1960s by Patricia Knapp. Knapp's system focused, not on the simple provision of answers to questions, but on the teaching of the effective use of the library and its resources– in other words, on the finding of one's “way” in the library.

Design/methodology/approach

A traditional theoretical model for the creation and evaluation of pathfinders (subject research guides) can be identified through study of the literature. This model, expressed in the design criteria of consistency, selectivity, transparency and accessibility, sprang from an impulse to serve the inexperienced user by emulating or facilitating the user's search process.

Findings

A gap in this model can be detected, in the form of a missing multi‐dimensional picture of the user and the user's experience of the information service via the pathfinder. In an attempt to fill the gap, literature examining information behavior, the search process, the design of user‐centered services, and the information retrieval interaction is discussed.

Originality/value

An experience‐centered model for online research guide design and evaluation is derived from the findings.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Patricia B.M. Brennan, Joanna Burkhardt, Susan McMullen and Marla Wallace

The experience of a multi‐site higher education library consortium in purchasing electronic journals and databases is described. The criteria and guidelines developed to…

Abstract

The experience of a multi‐site higher education library consortium in purchasing electronic journals and databases is described. The criteria and guidelines developed to assist in the decision‐making process for the purchase of multidisciplinary electronic products and services can be of value to other libraries whether in a single or consortial environment. Factors such as database features, coverage, search features, and delivery options were considered.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

Patricia Luthin

Once upon a time (the mid‐1960s) a Cataloging Department had only two major places to obtain catalog cards: the Library of Congress (proofsheets or sets of unit cards) and…

Abstract

Once upon a time (the mid‐1960s) a Cataloging Department had only two major places to obtain catalog cards: the Library of Congress (proofsheets or sets of unit cards) and the H.W. Wilson Company (full sets of cards using the Dewey classification). Thus everyone was filing proofsheets, copying them into card sets, ordering cards from L.C., taking Polaroid pictures of the National Union Catalog, or checking lists of available Wilson cards.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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