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Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-872-8

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Patricia A. Essex

Previous studies have examined the satisfaction of users with information services, but most measured attitudes after use of the system had begun. The focus in this paper…

Abstract

Previous studies have examined the satisfaction of users with information services, but most measured attitudes after use of the system had begun. The focus in this paper is upon the design and test of an instrument suitable for the systems development stage. The traditional “user satisfaction” construct is examined in two parts; user satisfaction with the process and user satisfaction with the product.The research instrument was administered in an experimental environment that simulated a work situation. Participants were asked not only to do their “normal” tasks but also to cooperate in a systems development project. Some were placed into time‐constrained situations; others were not. Results indicate that the user satisfaction construct can be evaluated during development and should be separated from product satisfaction. Further, attitudes toward the process and about the product are correlated positively but they are not perfect substitutes.The experimental situation yielded some evidence that requiring people to participate on development teams without compensatory release time or other incentives is likely to make them feel negative about the process. Although this negativity is not fully transferred to attitudes toward the product, it does exist and needs to be managed effectively.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2000

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-872-8

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Maria Adamson, Elisabeth K. Kelan, Patricia Lewis, Nick Rumens and Martyna Slíwa

This paper aims to suggest a shift in thinking about how to improve gender inclusion in organizations, as well as offering a number of practical action points.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to suggest a shift in thinking about how to improve gender inclusion in organizations, as well as offering a number of practical action points.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a perspective based on the authors’ own ongoing research, as well as synthesis of existing insights into gender inclusion in organizations.

Findings

To retain top talent and improve organizational climate, the authors need to re-think how the authors measure the success of organizational inclusion policies. Specifically, the paper suggests moving from numbers and targets to looking at the quality of gender inclusion in the workplace. The paper explains why this shift in thinking is important and how to approach it in practice.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights into and practical thinking about ways in which progressive organizations can continue to improve gender equality.

Originality/value

The paper makes a provocative call for a change of perspective on gender inclusion in organizations based on cutting-edge research and puts forward action points in an accessible format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2021

Elisabeth K. Kelan and Patricia Wratil

Chief executive officers (CEOs) are increasingly seen as change agents for gender equality, which means that CEOs have to lead others to achieve gender equality. Much of…

Abstract

Purpose

Chief executive officers (CEOs) are increasingly seen as change agents for gender equality, which means that CEOs have to lead others to achieve gender equality. Much of this leadership is going to happen through talk, which raises the question as to how CEOs talk about gender equality to act as change agents. The purpose of this paper is to understand the arguments of CEOs deploy.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on interviews with global CEOs, who have publicly supported gender equality work, the article draws on discourse analysis to understand the arguments of CEOs deploy.

Findings

The analysis shows that CEOs deploy three arguments. First, CEOs argue that women bring special skills to the workplace, which contributes to a female advantage. Second, CEOs argue that the best person for the job is hired. Third, CEOs talk about how biases and privilege permeate the workplace. The analysis shows that CEOs are often invested in essentialised views of gender while holding onto ideals of meritocracy.

Originality/value

The article suggests that how leaders talk about gender equality leads to continuity, rather than change in regard to gender equality.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Patricia Dearnaley

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Abstract

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 21 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Roger Welch and Patricia Leighton

Focuses on the introduction of personal contracts to replace terms and conditions of employment derived from collective agreements in light of the findings from three…

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Abstract

Focuses on the introduction of personal contracts to replace terms and conditions of employment derived from collective agreements in light of the findings from three surveys of employer organizations conducted in 1991/92, 1994/95 and 1995/96 by the Employment Relations R&D Centre at Anglia Polytechnic University. Argues that personal contracts reflect employer power and preferences rather than providing a mechanism for the empowerment of the individual employee through creating or increasing the ability of the individual to determine their terms and conditions of employment. Discusses the political and legal background to the decline in trade union power at the workplace. Contends that a real empowerment of employees is best achieved within a collectivist framework and is thus dependent on the re‐establishment and strengthening of individual and collective rights at work.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

Patricia Leighton

The foregoing sections have demonstrated and analysed the range and complexity of vulnerability in the labour market. Its source can be economic or legal, or can derive…

Abstract

The foregoing sections have demonstrated and analysed the range and complexity of vulnerability in the labour market. Its source can be economic or legal, or can derive from characteristics of work or workers. Vulnerability is not a stagnant or even declining phenomenon. Indeed, we have argued that not only are considerably more workers disadvantaged than, say, two decades ago, but that such a situation is compounded by government policy, concepts of core and peripheral workers, and by forces which have created or highlighted unconsidered or new areas of vulnerability. It is arguable that even the much publicised “networkers” who may have relatively attractive terms of work can become isolated and demoralised by working solely at home, and thus suffer yet another form of vulnerability.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Tom Schultheiss, Lorraine Hartline, Jean Mandeberg, Pam Petrich and Sue Stern

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

K.G.B. Bakewell

Resource sharing is an important element inthe national planning of library andinformation services to meet the needs ofinformation, education and culture of thewhole…

Abstract

Resource sharing is an important element in the national planning of library and information services to meet the needs of information, education and culture of the whole community at all levels. An overview of resource sharing practices is presented, with particular reference to the British scene. It is also argued that, with the approach of the Single Market in 1992, resource sharing should now be considered on a European scale. In conclusion, some problems associated with the practice of resource sharing are considered.

Details

Library Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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