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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Marie Freckleton and Patrice Whitely

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of a regional trade agreement among a group of small island developing states on trade creation and trade diversion.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of a regional trade agreement among a group of small island developing states on trade creation and trade diversion.

Design/methodology/approach

An augmented gravity model and panel data are used to estimate the trade creation and trade diversion effects. The generalized method of moments technique is used to account for possible endogeneity. Country pair and time fixed effects are also included.

Findings

The regional trade agreement had a positive effect on intra-regional trade creation, but there was no significant diversion of imports from extra-regional trade partners.

Practical implications

Small developing economies can benefit from regional trade agreements (RTAs) among themselves. The trade diversion effects of such agreements are likely to be limited.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this is the only paper which investigates the impact of RTAs among small island developing states.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Dean Elmuti, Judith Lehman, Brandon Harmon, Xiaoyan Lu, Andrea Pape, Ren Zhang and Terad Zimmerle

We examined the role gender plays in managerial stereotypes and changes that have occurred in the US for executive women in the workforce. We also investigated factors and…

Abstract

We examined the role gender plays in managerial stereotypes and changes that have occurred in the US for executive women in the workforce. We also investigated factors and personality traits that affect advancement into upper management for all executives and those that affect women in particular. Despite increased organisational sensitivity, public policies, and equal rights legislation, women continue to be underrepresented in corporate America. Pay increases and promotions for females have not kept pace with those for men. Study results also indicate that managerial womenwho juggle jobs and family life benefit from these multiple roles, but women who put off marriage and family to build top‐level careers suffer in later years from greatly reduced chances of finding spouses and having children. Further adaptation of organisational culture in the new economy, weakening of the glass ceiling phenomenon, and family friendly work policies may alleviate some of the difficulties experienced by women who want it all.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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