Search results

1 – 10 of over 12000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jafar A. Alasad and Muayyad M. Ahmad

This exploratory study investigated patientssatisfaction with nursing care at a major teaching hospital in Jordan. A total of 266 in‐patients participated in the study…

Abstract

This exploratory study investigated patientssatisfaction with nursing care at a major teaching hospital in Jordan. A total of 266 in‐patients participated in the study. Patients were recruited from the medical, surgical, and gynecological wards. Pearson correlation, one‐way analysis of variance, and logistic regression analyses were used. The findings showed that patients in surgical wards had lower levels of satisfaction than patients in medical or gynecological wards. Gender, educational level, and having other diseases were significant predictors for patientssatisfaction with nursing care. Methodological challenges, implications to nursing practice, and recommendations to nursing research are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Joseph S. Guarisco and Stefoni A. Bavin

The purpose of this paper is to provide a case study testing the Primary Provider Theory proposed by Aragon that states that: disproportionate to any other variables…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a case study testing the Primary Provider Theory proposed by Aragon that states that: disproportionate to any other variables, patient satisfaction is distinctly and primarily linked to physician behaviors and secondarily to waiting times.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study began by creating incentives motivating physicians to reflect and improve behaviors (patient interactions) and practice patterns (workflow efficiency). The Press Ganey Emergency Department Survey was then utilized to track the impact of the incentive programs and to ascertain any relationship between patient satisfaction with the provider and global patient satisfaction with emergency department visits by measuring patient satisfaction over an eight quarter period.

Findings

The findings were two‐fold: firstly, the concept of “pay for performance” as a tool for physician motivation was valid; and secondly, the impact on global patient satisfaction by increases in patient satisfaction with the primary provider was significant and highly correlated, as proposed by Aragon.

Practical implications

These findings can encourage hospitals and physician groups to place a high value on the performance of primary providers of patient care, provide incentives for appropriate provider behaviors through “pay for performance” programs and promote physician understanding of the links between global patient satisfaction with physician behaviors and business growth, malpractice reduction, and other key measures of business success.

Originality/value

There are no other case studies prior to this project validating the Primary Provider Theory in an urban medical center; this project adds to the validity and credibility of the theory in this setting.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Daniel P. Kessler and Deirdre Mylod

This paper aims to investigate how patient satisfaction affects propensity to return, i.e. loyalty.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how patient satisfaction affects propensity to return, i.e. loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 678 hospitals were matched using three sources. Patient satisfaction data were obtained from Press Ganey Associates, a leading survey firm; process‐based quality measures and hospital characteristics (such as ownership and teaching status) and geographic areas were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The frequency with which end‐of‐life patients return to seek treatment at the same hospital was obtained from the Dartmouth Atlas. The study uses regression analysis to estimate satisfaction's effects on patient loyalty, while holding process‐based quality measures and hospital and market characteristics constant.

Findings

There is a statistically significant link between satisfaction and loyalty. Although satisfaction's effect overall is relatively small, contentment with certain hospitalization experience may be important. The link between satisfaction and loyalty is weaker for high‐satisfaction hospitals, consistent with other studies in the marketing literature.

Research limitation/implications

The US hospitals analyzed are not a random sample; the results are most applicable to large, non‐profit teaching hospitals in competitive markets.

Practical implications

Satisfaction ratings have business implications for healthcare providers and may be useful as a management tool for private and public purchasers.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to show that patient satisfaction affects actual hospital choices in a large sample. Because patient satisfaction ratings are also correlated with other quality measures, the findings suggest a pathway through which individuals naturally gravitate toward higher‐quality care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Aradhana Bhargava, Archana Thakur, Bibhabati Mishra, Juhi Taneja, Vinita Dogra and Poonam Loomba

Measuring patient satisfaction plays an increasingly important role in the growing push toward healthcare provider accountability. This study seeks to evaluate G.B. Pant…

Abstract

Purpose

Measuring patient satisfaction plays an increasingly important role in the growing push toward healthcare provider accountability. This study seeks to evaluate G.B. Pant Hospital (a North Indian tertiary care centre) patient satisfaction with clinical laboratory services.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 100 out‐ and in‐patients were randomly selected and interviewed about microbiological services using a standard format, a method which can be easily used to compare patient satisfaction with laboratory services elsewhere.

Findings

Patients represented all age groups: females and males were balanced. Few were from poor socio‐economic backgrounds. Patients do not have problems getting tests done, but the laboratory's inconvenient location caused dissatisfaction. Patients do not have problems communicating with staff, but medical terms are not understood by patients. Hospital cleanliness needs improving, especially toilets, which causes the most patient dissatisfaction. Hospital staff were deemed highly competent and judged to give excellent technical help to patients. The questionnaire's financial subscale shows 100 per cent satisfaction because all tests in the microbiology department are free. The overall satisfaction with services stood at 83 per cent. Satisfaction scores for G.B. Pant Hospital appear to be satisfactory.

Research limitations/implications

This study does not compare patient satisfaction in two or more hospitals and findings may not be generalisable.

Practical implications

Patient satisfaction surveys are the best way to identify deficiencies and improve hospital services. Repeating studies at six monthly intervals is a useful managerial intervention aimed at delivering and maintaining quality healthcare.

Originality/value

This laboratory satisfaction survey is the first of its kind for government hospitals in India. The survey revealed a positive feedback and helped to identify the areas of concern along with estimating the patient satisfaction scores. This is the best way to identify the areas of deficiencies and improving the services provided by the hospital. The authors feel that repeating such studies at a regular interval of six months would be a useful guide for the managerial interventions.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Nesreen A. Alaloola and Waleed A. Albedaiwi

As one of the healthcare organizations striving to reach optimum quality level, King Abdulaziz Medical City staff believed that knowing the patients' service perspective…

Abstract

Purpose

As one of the healthcare organizations striving to reach optimum quality level, King Abdulaziz Medical City staff believed that knowing the patients' service perspective is one core service quality indicator. This article aims to spotlight the level of patient satisfaction or dissatisfaction in one Riyadh tertiary centre.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional survey involving 1983 inpatient, outpatient and emergency care patients at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh using a self‐developed patient satisfaction questionnaire.

Findings

There was a significant satisfaction with room comfort (88.5 percent), room temperature (78.1 percent), room call button system (87.9 percent), room cleanliness (79.6 percent) and respectful staff (87.4 percent). Patients were significantly dissatisfied with phlebotomists not introducing themselves (74 percent), not explaining procedures (57.2 percent) and physicians not introducing themselves (59.1 percent).

Research limitations/implications

Only the overall satisfaction dimensions were studied in a socio‐demographic context. Not every service was studied separately, so the patients' answers may not represent the hospital.

Practical implications

It is recommended that service standards in the areas in which patients were significantly dissatisfied should be raised by involving senior leaders. Areas for which patients were significantly satisfied will need to be sustained or even improved.

Originality/value

So far no similar service quality and patient satisfaction based studies from Saudi health care systems are reported in international peer reviewed journals.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Rosita Jamaluddin, Nurul Aqmaliza Abd Manan, Aina Mardiah Basri and Muhd Shahrim Ab Karim

The purpose of this paper is to determine patients' satisfaction with the bulk trolley food service system and the effect of the system on energy and protein intakes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine patients' satisfaction with the bulk trolley food service system and the effect of the system on energy and protein intakes.

Design/methodology/approach

An interview‐based questionnaire was used to measure patients' satisfaction (n=70) with the hospital food services. Dietary intake of hospital food was determined through one‐day weighed food intake survey and a food record for non‐hospital food.

Findings

The majority of the patients (98.6 per cent) were satisfied and 1.4 per cent was very satisfied with the food service. Energy (kcal) and protein (g) intakes from hospital food were higher than that of outside food (p<0.05). However, most patients did not obtain their full energy and protein requirements from the hospital food provided. Four food service dimensions were found to be significantly correlated with patients' overall satisfaction (p<0.05).

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaire was adapted from the study by Capra et al. and modified to suit the local food service system, thus the application may be context‐specific. The instrument did not measure factors that influence hospital food consumption, nor did it differentiate between the acceptability of different kinds of food. Also a comparison of patients' acceptance between the plated and bulk trolley system was not conducted in this study.

Practical implications

The results of the study can be used as a basis for decision making and for future planning of the food service system. The findings prompt analytical comparison, between the bulk trolley, and plated systems, in determining patients' preference, and to increase food intake.

Originality/value

Patient satisfaction surveys are regularly conducted in the country but none had ever studied the effectiveness of the bulk trolley system in relation to patients' satisfaction. The findings are noteworthy and, compared with the past literature review, the difference in the way the system is carried out in the country may be the contributing factor regarding patients' satisfaction system.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Brian A. Costello, Thomas G. McLeod, G. Richard Locke, Ross A. Dierkhising, Kenneth P. Offord and Robert C. Colligan

The purpose of this research is to determine whether a pessimistic or hostile personality style adversely affects satisfaction with out‐patient medical visits. Many patient

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to determine whether a pessimistic or hostile personality style adversely affects satisfaction with out‐patient medical visits. Many patient and health care provider demographic characteristics have been related to patient satisfaction with a health care encounter, but little has been written about the association between patients' personality characteristics and their satisfaction ratings.

Design/methodology/approach

An eight‐item patient satisfaction survey was completed by 11,636 randomly selected medical out‐patients two to three months after their episode of care. Of these, 1,259 had previously completed a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The association of pessimism and hostility scores with patient satisfaction ratings was assessed.

Findings

Among patients who scored high on the pessimism scale, 59 percent rated overall care by their physicians as excellent, while 72 percent with scores in the optimistic range rated it as excellent (p=0.003). Among the hostile patients, 57 percent rated their overall care by physicians as excellent, while 66 percent of the least hostile patients rated it as excellent (p=0.002).

Originality/value

Pessimistic or hostile patients were significantly less likely to rate their overall care as excellent than optimistic or non‐hostile patients.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Mumin Dayan, Ibrahim A. Al Kuwaiti, Zafar Husain, Poh Yen Ng and Aysenur Dayan

The aim of this research is to uncover issues that inhibit patients' satisfaction and loyalty and identify factors that could enhance customer retention by government…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to uncover issues that inhibit patients' satisfaction and loyalty and identify factors that could enhance customer retention by government hospitals in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The mediating impact of outpatient satisfaction on service quality, word of mouth (WoM), hospital image, outpatient–physician relationship and outpatient loyalty were tested.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample data used to test the hypotheses were drawn from a pool of patients served by a government healthcare agency in Abu Dhabi. Questionnaires were provided to 418 participants using methods such as short message service, e-mail and face-to-face delivery. The data were analyzed using SmartPLS 3.3.2 software.

Findings

The results indicate that service quality, WoM and outpatient–physician relationship positively impact outpatient satisfaction and indirectly effect outpatient loyalty; that hospital image positively impacts outpatient satisfaction and loyalty and has a partially mediating effect on loyalty; that waiting time satisfaction has no effect on outpatient satisfaction and no moderating effect on the outpatient satisfaction–loyalty relationship and that switching cost has a positive effect on loyalty but no moderating effect on the outpatient satisfaction–loyalty relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation of this study concerns the fact that only patients who had previously been served by these hospitals' outpatient units were included. Furthermore, the research was not able to obtain extensive findings related to the various factors that negatively impacted patient satisfaction and loyalty among all of the departments of government hospitals, such as inpatient care and emergency care.

Practical implications

Centered on the findings from this research, increasing switching costs would prevent patients from switching to other healthcare providers. Therefore, it has the potential to create a false loyalty or a hostage customer (Jones and Sasser, 1995). Additionally, making patients feel connected to their treatment plan and engaged in their care by developing a tool to maintain their enthusiasm about their health is important. It is therefore recommended that government hospital care providers and management consider providing online tools that patients can use to self-manage their care.

Social implications

The results regarding patients' satisfaction level suggest several areas for improvement. The first pertains to waiting area entertainment and comfort because patients indicated that there is not enough entertainment or ways to pass the time when waiting for services. In addition to enhancing the entertainment and comfort of waiting areas, government hospital staff should maintain contact with patients who are waiting to ensure that they are aware of the time they will spend. Another area for improvement is the parking lot. During summer, patients prefer to walk less in the sun, which causes them to seek parking closer to the door. Government hospital management should consider different methods for transporting patients closer to the door, such as golf carts or valet services.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the mediating impact of outpatients' satisfaction between its antecedents and loyalty in the UAE. These results provide an improved understanding of the factors influencing patient choices and establish more accurate methods for increasing patient loyalty to retain more patients.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Stephen C. Trumble, Mark L. O'Brien, Matthew O'Brien and Bronwyn Hartwig

The purpose of this paper is to examine changes in patients' satisfaction after their doctor has participated in a brief educational intervention on medicolegal risk management.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine changes in patients' satisfaction after their doctor has participated in a brief educational intervention on medicolegal risk management.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire completed by ambulatory patients, measuring satisfaction with their doctor's communication skills before and three months after the doctor participated in a three hour workshop on medicolegal risk management. 75 obstetrician/gynaecologists (O&Gs) and 99 general practitioners (GPs) were each rated by 60 of their patients following a consultation in their clinical rooms.

Findings

Patient satisfaction as evidenced by change to “complete satisfaction” with doctor's communication skills and overall satisfaction with the clinical encounter.

Practical implications

Participants had high initial patient satisfaction ratings and these were found to have improved across all parameters three months after the educational intervention.

Originality/value

The educational intervention was successful in improving doctors' communication skills as evidenced by enhanced patient satisfaction in all key areas, including those most frequently associated with patient complaint, litigation and adverse outcome.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Gordon Abekah-Nkrumah, Maame Yaa Antwi, Stephen Mahama Braimah and Charles Gyamfi Ofori

This paper aims to examine the effect of customer relationship management (CRM) on patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, controlling for other socio-demographic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of customer relationship management (CRM) on patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, controlling for other socio-demographic characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a two-stage sampling process and structured questionnaires to collect data from 788 patients from three health facilities (public, quasi-public and private) in Greater Accra, Ghana. The data collected was analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression via the partial least squares-based structural equation model.

Findings

The results suggest that CRM is significantly positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, with patient satisfaction also significantly correlated with patient loyalty. Additionally, the results suggest that the introduction of education, health facility ownership, health insurance status and gender, neither impact significantly on the relationship between CRM and patient satisfaction/patient loyalty nor influenced patient satisfaction and patient loyalty directly.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the current paper can have substantial practice implications for operators in the health-care industry in Ghana. CRM components such as service quality, customer service, communication and the use of appropriate technology to deliver service will be fundamental if organizations operating in the health-care ecosystem in Ghana are to be able to compete effectively.

Originality/value

This is one of the very few papers on the relationship between CRM and patient satisfaction and patient loyalty in African health-care literature. Thus, the findings of the paper can constitute a great resource not only to academics but also to practitioners who are looking to be competitive in the health-care market.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 12000