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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Jafar A. Alasad and Muayyad M. Ahmad

This exploratory study investigated patientssatisfaction with nursing care at a major teaching hospital in Jordan. A total of 266 in‐patients participated in the study…

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Abstract

This exploratory study investigated patientssatisfaction with nursing care at a major teaching hospital in Jordan. A total of 266 in‐patients participated in the study. Patients were recruited from the medical, surgical, and gynecological wards. Pearson correlation, one‐way analysis of variance, and logistic regression analyses were used. The findings showed that patients in surgical wards had lower levels of satisfaction than patients in medical or gynecological wards. Gender, educational level, and having other diseases were significant predictors for patientssatisfaction with nursing care. Methodological challenges, implications to nursing practice, and recommendations to nursing research are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Joseph S. Guarisco and Stefoni A. Bavin

The purpose of this paper is to provide a case study testing the Primary Provider Theory proposed by Aragon that states that: disproportionate to any other variables…

1413

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a case study testing the Primary Provider Theory proposed by Aragon that states that: disproportionate to any other variables, patient satisfaction is distinctly and primarily linked to physician behaviors and secondarily to waiting times.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study began by creating incentives motivating physicians to reflect and improve behaviors (patient interactions) and practice patterns (workflow efficiency). The Press Ganey Emergency Department Survey was then utilized to track the impact of the incentive programs and to ascertain any relationship between patient satisfaction with the provider and global patient satisfaction with emergency department visits by measuring patient satisfaction over an eight quarter period.

Findings

The findings were two‐fold: firstly, the concept of “pay for performance” as a tool for physician motivation was valid; and secondly, the impact on global patient satisfaction by increases in patient satisfaction with the primary provider was significant and highly correlated, as proposed by Aragon.

Practical implications

These findings can encourage hospitals and physician groups to place a high value on the performance of primary providers of patient care, provide incentives for appropriate provider behaviors through “pay for performance” programs and promote physician understanding of the links between global patient satisfaction with physician behaviors and business growth, malpractice reduction, and other key measures of business success.

Originality/value

There are no other case studies prior to this project validating the Primary Provider Theory in an urban medical center; this project adds to the validity and credibility of the theory in this setting.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Daniel P. Kessler and Deirdre Mylod

This paper aims to investigate how patient satisfaction affects propensity to return, i.e. loyalty.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how patient satisfaction affects propensity to return, i.e. loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 678 hospitals were matched using three sources. Patient satisfaction data were obtained from Press Ganey Associates, a leading survey firm; process‐based quality measures and hospital characteristics (such as ownership and teaching status) and geographic areas were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The frequency with which end‐of‐life patients return to seek treatment at the same hospital was obtained from the Dartmouth Atlas. The study uses regression analysis to estimate satisfaction's effects on patient loyalty, while holding process‐based quality measures and hospital and market characteristics constant.

Findings

There is a statistically significant link between satisfaction and loyalty. Although satisfaction's effect overall is relatively small, contentment with certain hospitalization experience may be important. The link between satisfaction and loyalty is weaker for high‐satisfaction hospitals, consistent with other studies in the marketing literature.

Research limitation/implications

The US hospitals analyzed are not a random sample; the results are most applicable to large, non‐profit teaching hospitals in competitive markets.

Practical implications

Satisfaction ratings have business implications for healthcare providers and may be useful as a management tool for private and public purchasers.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to show that patient satisfaction affects actual hospital choices in a large sample. Because patient satisfaction ratings are also correlated with other quality measures, the findings suggest a pathway through which individuals naturally gravitate toward higher‐quality care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Aradhana Bhargava, Archana Thakur, Bibhabati Mishra, Juhi Taneja, Vinita Dogra and Poonam Loomba

Measuring patient satisfaction plays an increasingly important role in the growing push toward healthcare provider accountability. This study seeks to evaluate G.B. Pant…

Abstract

Purpose

Measuring patient satisfaction plays an increasingly important role in the growing push toward healthcare provider accountability. This study seeks to evaluate G.B. Pant Hospital (a North Indian tertiary care centre) patient satisfaction with clinical laboratory services.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 100 out‐ and in‐patients were randomly selected and interviewed about microbiological services using a standard format, a method which can be easily used to compare patient satisfaction with laboratory services elsewhere.

Findings

Patients represented all age groups: females and males were balanced. Few were from poor socio‐economic backgrounds. Patients do not have problems getting tests done, but the laboratory's inconvenient location caused dissatisfaction. Patients do not have problems communicating with staff, but medical terms are not understood by patients. Hospital cleanliness needs improving, especially toilets, which causes the most patient dissatisfaction. Hospital staff were deemed highly competent and judged to give excellent technical help to patients. The questionnaire's financial subscale shows 100 per cent satisfaction because all tests in the microbiology department are free. The overall satisfaction with services stood at 83 per cent. Satisfaction scores for G.B. Pant Hospital appear to be satisfactory.

Research limitations/implications

This study does not compare patient satisfaction in two or more hospitals and findings may not be generalisable.

Practical implications

Patient satisfaction surveys are the best way to identify deficiencies and improve hospital services. Repeating studies at six monthly intervals is a useful managerial intervention aimed at delivering and maintaining quality healthcare.

Originality/value

This laboratory satisfaction survey is the first of its kind for government hospitals in India. The survey revealed a positive feedback and helped to identify the areas of concern along with estimating the patient satisfaction scores. This is the best way to identify the areas of deficiencies and improving the services provided by the hospital. The authors feel that repeating such studies at a regular interval of six months would be a useful guide for the managerial interventions.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Nesreen A. Alaloola and Waleed A. Albedaiwi

As one of the healthcare organizations striving to reach optimum quality level, King Abdulaziz Medical City staff believed that knowing the patients' service perspective…

1535

Abstract

Purpose

As one of the healthcare organizations striving to reach optimum quality level, King Abdulaziz Medical City staff believed that knowing the patients' service perspective is one core service quality indicator. This article aims to spotlight the level of patient satisfaction or dissatisfaction in one Riyadh tertiary centre.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional survey involving 1983 inpatient, outpatient and emergency care patients at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh using a self‐developed patient satisfaction questionnaire.

Findings

There was a significant satisfaction with room comfort (88.5 percent), room temperature (78.1 percent), room call button system (87.9 percent), room cleanliness (79.6 percent) and respectful staff (87.4 percent). Patients were significantly dissatisfied with phlebotomists not introducing themselves (74 percent), not explaining procedures (57.2 percent) and physicians not introducing themselves (59.1 percent).

Research limitations/implications

Only the overall satisfaction dimensions were studied in a socio‐demographic context. Not every service was studied separately, so the patients' answers may not represent the hospital.

Practical implications

It is recommended that service standards in the areas in which patients were significantly dissatisfied should be raised by involving senior leaders. Areas for which patients were significantly satisfied will need to be sustained or even improved.

Originality/value

So far no similar service quality and patient satisfaction based studies from Saudi health care systems are reported in international peer reviewed journals.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2022

Mahmut Selami Akin and Abdullah Okumuş

The study aims to guide private healthcare organizations to create value for patients through service encounters (SE) based on the value-in-use notion. It also intends to…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to guide private healthcare organizations to create value for patients through service encounters (SE) based on the value-in-use notion. It also intends to reveal whether SE experiences differ from reputation levels of hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Research embraces mixed methods for building theoretical construction and sampling, seven hospital managers and two private hospitals were interviewed and selected via analytical hierarchical process. A number of 1,023 valid data were obtained from patients through survey. Structural equation modeling, PROCESS macro and multigroup analysis were used to test for research model.

Findings

Call center experience among pre-core SE affected patient satisfaction positively and behavioral intention indirectly; however, online and social experiences did not. As core SE, physician and nursing interaction, trust, accessibility and perceived sufficient waiting positively influenced patient satisfaction and behavioral intention, though physical evidence and supportive staff interaction did not. In the post-core stage, patient satisfaction positively impacts behavioral intention. Additionally, those effects were equivalent for high and low reputations.

Originality/value

Study uniquely attempts to shift the paradigm from value-in-exchange to value-in-use in private healthcare context by embracing SE approach. Research differs from others by revealing the remarkable role of intangible assets instead of tangibles on holistic patient experience, essential for creating and managing value for patients.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Rosita Jamaluddin, Nurul Aqmaliza Abd Manan, Aina Mardiah Basri and Muhd Shahrim Ab Karim

The purpose of this paper is to determine patients' satisfaction with the bulk trolley food service system and the effect of the system on energy and protein intakes.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine patients' satisfaction with the bulk trolley food service system and the effect of the system on energy and protein intakes.

Design/methodology/approach

An interview‐based questionnaire was used to measure patients' satisfaction (n=70) with the hospital food services. Dietary intake of hospital food was determined through one‐day weighed food intake survey and a food record for non‐hospital food.

Findings

The majority of the patients (98.6 per cent) were satisfied and 1.4 per cent was very satisfied with the food service. Energy (kcal) and protein (g) intakes from hospital food were higher than that of outside food (p<0.05). However, most patients did not obtain their full energy and protein requirements from the hospital food provided. Four food service dimensions were found to be significantly correlated with patients' overall satisfaction (p<0.05).

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaire was adapted from the study by Capra et al. and modified to suit the local food service system, thus the application may be context‐specific. The instrument did not measure factors that influence hospital food consumption, nor did it differentiate between the acceptability of different kinds of food. Also a comparison of patients' acceptance between the plated and bulk trolley system was not conducted in this study.

Practical implications

The results of the study can be used as a basis for decision making and for future planning of the food service system. The findings prompt analytical comparison, between the bulk trolley, and plated systems, in determining patients' preference, and to increase food intake.

Originality/value

Patient satisfaction surveys are regularly conducted in the country but none had ever studied the effectiveness of the bulk trolley system in relation to patients' satisfaction. The findings are noteworthy and, compared with the past literature review, the difference in the way the system is carried out in the country may be the contributing factor regarding patients' satisfaction system.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Brian A. Costello, Thomas G. McLeod, G. Richard Locke, Ross A. Dierkhising, Kenneth P. Offord and Robert C. Colligan

The purpose of this research is to determine whether a pessimistic or hostile personality style adversely affects satisfaction with out‐patient medical visits. Many patient

1437

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to determine whether a pessimistic or hostile personality style adversely affects satisfaction with out‐patient medical visits. Many patient and health care provider demographic characteristics have been related to patient satisfaction with a health care encounter, but little has been written about the association between patients' personality characteristics and their satisfaction ratings.

Design/methodology/approach

An eight‐item patient satisfaction survey was completed by 11,636 randomly selected medical out‐patients two to three months after their episode of care. Of these, 1,259 had previously completed a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The association of pessimism and hostility scores with patient satisfaction ratings was assessed.

Findings

Among patients who scored high on the pessimism scale, 59 percent rated overall care by their physicians as excellent, while 72 percent with scores in the optimistic range rated it as excellent (p=0.003). Among the hostile patients, 57 percent rated their overall care by physicians as excellent, while 66 percent of the least hostile patients rated it as excellent (p=0.002).

Originality/value

Pessimistic or hostile patients were significantly less likely to rate their overall care as excellent than optimistic or non‐hostile patients.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2022

Yonca Yıldırım, Mustafa Amarat and Mahmut Akbolat

This study aims to reveal the mediating role of patient satisfaction on the impact of relationship marketing on hospital loyalty.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reveal the mediating role of patient satisfaction on the impact of relationship marketing on hospital loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The scale questionnaires used in the study was the Relationship Marketing, Hospital Loyalty and the Patient Satisfaction Scale. The population of the study is made up of the patients who received in-hospital services in private hospitals operating in Kocaeli province. The field study was conducted between August 1 and October 31, 2019. After determining the sample size, the study was conducted on 401 patients in private hospitals primarily using the purposive sampling method. Descriptive statistics, correlation analysis and statistical package for the social sciences Process Macro were used to analyze the data.

Findings

According to the findings of this study, patient satisfaction has an effect on hospital loyalty. Relationship marketing has an impact on hospital loyalty, and this effect is further enhanced by patient satisfaction. In other words, patient satisfaction has a mediating role in the impact of relationship marketing on hospital loyalty. Relationship marketing plays an important role in creating hospital loyalty and patient satisfaction. For this reason, it is recommended that health institutions adopt relationship marketing practices. Hospital loyalty and patient satisfaction will be ensured through relationship marketing. This will allow the health-care institution to continue to exist and to be more advantageous than other institutions.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of the paper lies not only in the only regression findings but also in the methodology used to capture the impact of the lagged effect of marketing relationships on hospital loyalty. Specifically, a regression model is based on both direct and indirect effects.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2022

Gustavo Quiroga Souki, Juliana Meire Silva de Ávila, Luiz Rodrigo Cunha Moura and Bernardo Quiroga Souki

Monitoring the perception of quality by parents and the satisfaction with their children’s treatment is crucial in developing high-level health-care services. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Monitoring the perception of quality by parents and the satisfaction with their children’s treatment is crucial in developing high-level health-care services. The purpose of this paper is to identify the perceived quality factors by parents of paediatric orthodontic patients according to the levels of satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey with 316 parents of paediatric orthodontic patients of 45 offices in a big Brazilian city was conducted. The questionnaires included statements on the parents’ satisfaction and perception of quality concerning their children’s treatment. The data were analysed using multivariate statistics (exploratory factor analysis, cluster analysis and discriminant analysis).

Findings

Parents were classified into three clusters according to their level of satisfaction. This survey identified 11 quality factors perceived by parents of patients regarding their children’s orthodontic treatment. Among them, five factors discriminated the clusters: orthodontist’s technical skills, administrative organisation, location (accessibility and convenience), treatment duration and dental supplies.

Practical implications

This research identified the perceived quality factors that most impacted parents of orthodontic patientssatisfaction, contributing to dentists in developing strategies and actions to improve the quality of services in dental offices.

Originality/value

This paper included 11 perceived quality factors in the hypothetical model, identified through literature review and a qualitative phase. Moreover, multivariate statistical analyses confirmed the validity and reliability of the questionnaires, classified respondents in clusters and identified the perceived quality factors that most discriminated them. Therefore, the current investigation presented a more comprehensive and robust analysis than the previous studies on this topic.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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