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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2019

Ghasem Abedi, Ghahraman Mahmoodi, Roya Malekzadeh, Zeinab Khodaei, Yibeltal Siraneh Belete and Edris Hasanpoor

The regulation defines patientsrights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patientsrights accepted in…

Abstract

Purpose

The regulation defines patientsrights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patientsrights accepted in international texts. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between patients’ safety, medical errors and patients’ safety rights with patients’ security feeling in selected hospitals of Mazandaran Province, Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in selected hospitals of Mazandaran Province in public, social and private hospitals in 2016. In total, 1,083 patients were randomly selected for the study. The developed tool (questionnaire) was used for data collection. Questionnaire validity was verified through experts and its reliability was confirmed by Cronbach’s α coefficient (95 percent). Data were analyzed through multiple regressions by SPSS software (version 21).

Findings

The findings of this paper showed that the mean (standard deviation) medical error, patient’s safety, patient’s rights and patient’s security feeling were 2.50±0.61, 2.22±0.67, 2.11±0.68 and 2.73±0.63, respectively. Correlation testing results showed that medical error, patient’s safety and patient’s rights simultaneously had a significant relation with patient’s security feeling in the selected hospitals (p<0.05).

Originality/value

A simultaneous correlation between patient’s safety, patient’s rights and medical errors with patient’s security feeling in social security hospitals was higher than other hospitals. Hence, the authorities and officials of hospitals and healthcare centers were advised to make effective attempts to perceive the patient’s safety, medical errors and patient’s rights to improve the patient’s security feeling and calmness and also to make better decisions to promote the healthcare and therapeutic services.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Hojjat Sheikhbardsiri, Zahra Esamaeili Abdar, Hakimeh Sheikhasadi, Shahla Ayoubi Mahani and Arezoo Sarani

Patient right is the most important ethical right in the hospital, which equally, belongs to every human kind. Observance of patient right is responsibility of all…

Abstract

Purpose

Patient right is the most important ethical right in the hospital, which equally, belongs to every human kind. Observance of patient right is responsibility of all treatment staff when they offer treatment and care for patient. This study aims to investigate observance of patientsrights in emergency department of educational hospitals in south-east Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a cross-sectional design and was conducted in four educational hospitals affiliated with the Kerman University of Medical Sciences in 2018. Using a two-section standard questionnaire of PatientsRights Charter, this study assessed patientsrights observance using a census method, N = 382. The data from the questionnaire were analyzed using descriptive statistics including mean and standard deviations and analytic statistics such as Kolmogorov – Smirnov, ANOVA, t-test and Pearson test using SPSS 21.

Findings

Means of total score for observing all essentials of patientsrights in emergency department of educational hospitals were at a moderate level (43.10 ±15.05) from the viewpoint of patients. The area of “providing health services based on respecting patient’s privacy and observing the essentials of secrecy and confidentiality” enjoying the highest mean score (86.89 ± 24.39), was at a good level compared to other areas. The area of “having access to effective complaint management system” showed the lowest mean score (23/85 ± 23/07) from the participants’ perspective proving a poor level. Between the patient rights observance and gender, education level, resident status and duration of hospitalization, a significant relationship was observed.

Originality/value

As regarded in this study, the degree of patientsrights observance was moderate so, culture, paying attention to the rights of all stakeholders, identifying barriers and various factors, including the professional and environmental differences in the assessment of the need, should be considered by policymakers to design promotional and regulatory programs for improving the rights of the patient.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2019

Gholam Reza Sharifzadeh, DJavad Ghoddoosi-Nejad, Susan Behdani, Elaheh Haghgoshayie, Yibeltal Siraneh and Edris Hasanpoor

The Iranian patientsrights charter defines patient rights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patient

Abstract

Purpose

The Iranian patientsrights charter defines patient rights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patient rights accepted in international texts. The purpose of this paper is to study the way in which diabetes patientsrights are being exercised in everyday hospital practice in Birjand, Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study design was used in 2014. The sample size was estimated 150 patients, out of which 108 diabetes patients completed questionnaire. The questionnaire of diabetes patients’ perspectives on the patientsrights was used to collect data. The questionnaire consists of 22 questions. Data entry and analysis were carried out using SPSS software (version 22). Descriptive and inferential statistics were calculated with all survey items and total scores, as well as demographic data.

Findings

The response rate was 72 percent. Overall, the mean score percentage of diabetes patients’ perspectives on the patientsrights was 74.04± 8.4. Furthermore, statistical significant differences were found among diabetes patients in relation to patients’ perspectives on the patientsrights according to highest level of education (F=16.52, p=0.002), their habitat(t=3.49, p=0.001), age groups (F=18.70, p=0.0001) and the duration of the disease (F=5.16, p=0.007). The results showed that no statistically significant differences were observed among diabetes patients in relation to diabetes patients’ perspectives on the patientsrights according to their gender (F=1.57, p=0.12) and marital status (F=1.56, p=0.09).

Originality/value

Clinicians can provide care based on patientsrights, and their knowledge of patientsrights needs to be evaluated. Educational courses, leaflets, booklets and posters can be helpful in this regard. In addition, professional organizations and the Ministry of Health need to be more sensitive to this issue.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Kamlesh Patel

The draft Mental Health Bill 2004 proposes transfer of the main monitoring functions of the Mental Health Act Commission (MHAC) to the Healthcare Commission (or in…

Abstract

The draft Mental Health Bill 2004 proposes transfer of the main monitoring functions of the Mental Health Act Commission (MHAC) to the Healthcare Commission (or in practice whatever body succeeds the Healthcare Commission) with the abolition of the MHAC on implementation of the Bill when enacted. This paper describes the present role and remit of the Mental Health Act Commission, outlines the government's strategy on inspection and regulation and identifies the importance of protecting the rights of vulnerable adults and children with mental disorders. The reasons for retaining independent scrutiny and inspection of mental health services are explored and structures and mechanisms that might assist in achieving an effective regulatory environment are proposed.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Aikaterini Nomidou

The purpose of this paper is to assess the quality of healthcare offered by a Greek Public Psychiatric Clinic. Special attention is paid to the degree to which the Clinic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the quality of healthcare offered by a Greek Public Psychiatric Clinic. Special attention is paid to the degree to which the Clinic promotes human rights, social inclusion, and autonomy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for an exploratory study using the open-ended approach of grounded theory, including 21 depth interviews with patients, staff members and patients’ relatives, documentation review and observation by an independent assessment team consisting of the author, a sociologist with mental disabilities, and a psychologist using the World Health Organization QualityRights tool kit which uses the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) as its frame. The data complemented by a group discussion with employees in another Clinic of the same hospital.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights about how the steps taken by the Psychiatric Clinic to address several of the themes drawn from the CRPD require either improvement or initiation to comply fully with the convention's themes, and how this compares unfavorably with the Urology Clinic.

Research limitations/implications

Sample size and restriction of the data to only one mental health facility limit the generalizibility of the results. Staff who reported professional burnout and cuts in wages may have been be susceptible to recall bias due to current negative mood. Respondent patients may also have failed to disclose their true experiences due to fear of punishment.

Originality/value

The paper uses a new methodology and instrument to assess current practice in mental health facilities in relation to international human rights standards emanating from the CRPD as well as the degree of parity between mental health and general health services.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Peace Njideka Iheanacho, Chisom Joy Mbadugha, Chinenye Juliet Anetekhai, Chinenye Ifeoma Ubah, Adaobi Lilian Obiekwu and Nonye Anne Chukwujama

Human right is a phenomenon universal to all but greatly significant for disadvantaged groups like people with mental illness who due to the limitations of their illness…

Abstract

Purpose

Human right is a phenomenon universal to all but greatly significant for disadvantaged groups like people with mental illness who due to the limitations of their illness cannot assert their rights. This study aims to assess the knowledge and attitude of nursing students regarding the human rights of people with mental illness.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive study was conducted among 72 nursing students purposively selected from two nursing schools in Enugu, Nigeria. Data were collected using a 38 item literature-based questionnaire developed by the researchers. The reliability of the instrument was established using Cronbach’s alpha model with 0.812 coefficients.

Findings

Participants 32 (44.4%) demonstrated moderate knowledge regarding the human rights of people with mental illness. The attitude of nursing students towards the right of people with mental illness was positive (2.81). There is no significant difference in knowledge between students of the two schools, p = 0.199 (>0.05). However, the study showed that students from basic nursing school had a more favourable attitude towards the rights of people with mental illness compared to the post-basic nursing students, p = 0.050 (<0.05).

Originality/value

The rising incidence of human right violation in mental health practice indicates the need to assess the knowledge and attitude of the future workforce who play a critical role in the care and management of people with mental illness. The nursing curriculum should provide nursing students in their various institutions of training, sufficient information on the human rights of people with mental illness. Also, a legal structure in Nigeria for people with mental illness is imperative to protect them from gross human rights violations.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Roya Malekzadeh, Ghasem Abedi, Ehsan Abedini, Elaheh Haghgoshayie, Edris Hasanpoor and Matina Ghasemi

Respect for human rights is one of the most important criteria for the delivery of medical care in hospitals. Ethical predictability is useful to identify human rights

Abstract

Purpose

Respect for human rights is one of the most important criteria for the delivery of medical care in hospitals. Ethical predictability is useful to identify human rights concerns in health-care organizations. The hospital environment and the flow of its processes make the topic of predictability much more sensitive and, at the same time, more difficult than other organizations. The purpose of this paper is to determine and compare the ethical predictive factors in selected hospitals in Mazandaran province.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional survey using multilevel sampling (four hospitals, 938 patients, 186 staff) was conducted in the first half of 2017. The measurement instrument was a researcher-made questionnaire consisting of seven areas of service recipients’ rights, patient safety, patient satisfaction, human resources, governance, organizational and financial commitments. The analysis of the collected data was performed through SPSS V. 22 and one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey’s tests.

Findings

Ethical predictability was higher in social security hospitals compared to private and public hospitals, and patient safety and patient rights showed higher magnitudes compared to other dimensions. Financial domain, patient satisfaction, governance and organizational commitment formed the middle priorities in ethical predictability, and human resources had the least average in ethical predictability in the selected hospitals in the province.

Originality/value

Identifying the factors which influence ethical predictability, in addition to promoting service recipients’ rights and patient satisfaction, is of great help to the managers and health service authorities, so that they can have a better understanding of these factors and, consequently, make appropriate micro and macro-decisions to provide better services.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Gordon Abekah‐Nkrumah, Abubakar Manu and Roger Ayimbillah Atinga

This paper seeks to assess the implementation of Ghana's Patients' Charter by investigating the level of awareness and knowledge of the Charter's content, some…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to assess the implementation of Ghana's Patients' Charter by investigating the level of awareness and knowledge of the Charter's content, some socio‐demographic factors that may influence awareness and knowledge of the Charter and how providers have discharged their responsibilities under the Charter.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research approach, sampling respondents from providers and patients in four facilities from the Greater Accra region, was used. Simple frequencies and Chi‐square test were used for analysing responses.

Findings

Study findings show that the majority of patients (53.4 per cent) are not aware of the existence of the Charter of those that know about it, a sizeable minority (33.7 per cent) are not knowledgeable about its contents. Relative to patients, providers exhibit better awareness (61.8 per cent) and content knowledge (61.8 per cent) of the Patients' Charter, but on the whole are not yet carrying out their responsibilities under it. In terms of socio‐demographic factors influencing awareness and knowledge of content, only education was found to be a positive correlate of awareness and knowledge. The relationship between providers and patients is generally cordial and could be used as a platform for improving awareness and knowledge of the charter, which could be crucial for improving service delivery.

Research limitations/implications

This is an initial exploratory research with a limited sample, which was biased towards the educated. Findings are, however, instructive and essential for more extensive and representative research in this area.

Originality/value

Since the Charter was launched in 2002, this study is the first of its kind and therefore provides important information for policy and further research.

Details

Health Education, vol. 110 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Russell Ashmore and Neil Carver

The purpose of this paper is to determine what written information is given to informally admitted patients in England and Wales regarding their legal rights in relation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine what written information is given to informally admitted patients in England and Wales regarding their legal rights in relation to freedom of movement and treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

Information leaflets were obtained by a search of all National Health Service mental health trust websites in England and health boards in Wales and via a Freedom of Information Act 2000 request. Data were analysed using content analysis.

Findings

Of the 61 organisations providing inpatient care, 27 provided written information in the form of a leaflet. Six provided public access to the information leaflets via their website prior to admission. Although the majority of leaflets were accurate the breadth and depth of the information varied considerably. Despite a common legal background there was confusion and inconsistency in the use of the terms informal and voluntary as well as inconsistency regarding freedom of movement, the right to refuse treatment and discharge against medical advice.

Research limitations/implications

The research has demonstrated the value of Freedom of Information Act 2000 requests in obtaining data. Further research should explore the effectiveness of informing patients of their rights from their perspective.

Practical implications

Work should be undertaken to establish a consensus of good practice in this area. Information should be consistent, accurate and understandable.

Originality/value

This is the only research reporting on the availability and content of written information given to informal patients about their legal rights.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Ebru Saygili and Yucel Ozturkoglu

The purpose of this study is to explore the presence of ethical standards in the content of international hospitals codes of ethics disclosed in their websites.

438

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the presence of ethical standards in the content of international hospitals codes of ethics disclosed in their websites.

Design/methodology/approach

Firstly, the focus is on developing an integrated framework of universal values and hospital responsibilities for the content of hospitals’ codes of ethics documents. A list of key ethical issues was determined through an examination of the American Medical Association Code of Medical Ethics (2016), the WAMA (2017), International Code of Medical Ethics and relevant peer-reviewed journal articles (Finseschi, 1997; Vergallo, 2016; Suhonen et al., 2011; Reader et al., 2014). Based on the detailed literature review, 48 concepts, which were evenly, classified under two groups; professional conduct issues and patientsrights. In the second stage, the issues were ranked related to professional conduct and patientsrights from most to least frequent for the proposed conceptual framework, using World Global Hospitals codes of ethics.

Findings

It was found that only 62% of the top 100 hospitals have an ethics code report in their websites. The findings of the study have significant theoretical and practical implications. First, most of the hospitals’ ethical codes extensively emphasize professional conduct and patientsrights, whereas they differ in what they include or exclude from their codes and the wording used. The number and frequency of the professional conduct issues is higher than patientsrights. Emerging ethical issues, such as physicians’ and patients’ freedom of choice, sperm donation and artificial reproduction, were not widely mentioned, whereas abortion, euthanasia, human rights and transplantation issues were disregarded entirely.

Practical implications

This study provides a benchmark for hospitals to assess their codes against other hospitals’ codes in terms of the specific items they address.

Social implications

The results of this study provide a benchmark for evaluating and developing ethical codes for hospitals in light of the international health standards and norms.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, no previous study has theoretically or practically analyzed hospitals’ codes of ethics.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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