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Article

Stefanie Naumann and Jeffrey A. Miles

In a study of 195 patients visiting the urgent care department of a hospital in the UK, we examined the effects of three elements of process control on patients’ fairness…

Abstract

In a study of 195 patients visiting the urgent care department of a hospital in the UK, we examined the effects of three elements of process control on patients’ fairness and satisfaction perceptions. Patients who believed they had a voice in the triage process had higher fairness perceptions and waited a shorter period of time than those who believed they did not have a voice in the triage process. In addition, patients who were told the expected waiting time and were kept busy while waiting had higher satisfaction perceptions. We identify implications for hospital employees in managing the patient waiting process.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article

Rhian Silvestro

The need to better understand patient priorities in order to provide higher levels of patient care is an ongoing challenge for managers across the UK NHS. Indeed, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The need to better understand patient priorities in order to provide higher levels of patient care is an ongoing challenge for managers across the UK NHS. Indeed, the failure of service providers to understand patient priorities can lead to action plans, investment and management decisions which are internally rather than externally focused. This paper seeks to report on the development and evaluation of a tool for measuring the gap between patients’ priorities and their perceptions of an NHS service, and the match between the patient and management perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The tool, an adaptation of the renowned SERVQUAL measurement methodology, is tested in UK NHS breast‐screening unit. The tool is used to measure the perceptions of two different types of patients, as well as those of three different types of staff.

Findings

The study suggests that the tool can be used to quantify the gap between patient priorities and their perceptions of health service performance. The tool may also be used to measure staff's perceptions of patient priorities and perceptions, with a view to identifying those functional staff who best understand the patient perspective.

Originality/value

The methodology facilitates the identification of key differences in the expectations and perceptions of different health service market segments, which could have direct implications for service design and delivery at an operational level. Furthermore, it can be applied to identify differences in functional perspectives and thus expose valuable opportunities for intra‐organisational learning.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

Thomas Andersson, Nomie Eriksson and Tomas Müllern

The purpose of the paper is to describe and analyze differences in patients' quality perceptions of private and public primary care centers in Sweden.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to describe and analyze differences in patients' quality perceptions of private and public primary care centers in Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

The article explores the differences in quality perceptions between patients of public and private primary care centers based on data from a large patient survey in Sweden. The survey covers seven dimensions, and in this paper the measure Overall impression was used for the comparison. With more than 80,000 valid responses, the survey covers all primary care centers in Sweden which allowed for a detailed analysis of differences in quality perceptions among patients from the different categories of owners.

Findings

The article contributes with a detailed description of different types of private owners: not-for-profit and for profit, as well as corporate groups and independent care centers. The results show a higher quality perception for independent centers compared to both public and corporate groups.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of not-for-profit centers (21 out of 1,117 centers) does not allow for clear conclusions for this group. The results, however, indicate an even higher patient quality perception for not-for-profit centers. The study focus on describing differences in quality perceptions between the owner categories. Future research can contribute with explanations to why independent care centers receive higher patient satisfaction.

Social implications

The results from the study have policy implications both in a Swedish as well as international perspective. The differentiation between different types of private owners made in this paper opens up for interesting discussions on privatization of healthcare and how it affects patient satisfaction.

Originality/value

The main contribution of the paper is the detailed comparison of different categories of private owners and the public owners.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Aaron Asibi Abuosi

The purpose of this paper is to find out whether there are any significant gaps in perceptions of quality of care between patients and healthcare providers in Ghana’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out whether there are any significant gaps in perceptions of quality of care between patients and healthcare providers in Ghana’s hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey of patients seeking outpatient consultations in 17 general hospitals in Ghana was conducted. A total of 818 patients and 152 hospital managers were interviewed. A 22-item quality of care scale was used in data collection. Data were analysed with the aid SPSS version 20. Summary statistics and t-test were used to analyse the data.

Findings

There was a significant difference in the overall perception of quality of care between patients and healthcare providers (Patients: M=89.11, SD=11.457; Providers: M=94.60, SD=10.922; t (845) −4.956, p < 001, two-tailed). Also, 18 items out of the 22-item quality of care scale showed significant difference between patients and providers. However, levels of quality of care is generally rated fairly favourably by both category of respondents.

Research limitations/implications

Further study is required to explore the reasons for the perceived quality gaps between patients and healthcare providers.

Practical implications

Management of hospitals need to evaluate patientsperceptions of quality of care to inform measures aimed at improving quality of care, since what they may consider as good quality service may be rated less favourably by patients.

Originality/value

Comparing perceptions of quality between patients and healthcare providers is important in order adopt measures to address any differences in perceptions of quality between the two stakeholders. To the best of the author’s knowledge no study has been conducted in Ghana to that effect.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article

Ari Mwachofi, Stephen L. Walston and Badran A. Al‐Omar

Nurses heavily influence patient care quality and safety. This paper aims to examine socioeconomic and organizational/system factors affecting patient safety and quality…

Abstract

Purpose

Nurses heavily influence patient care quality and safety. This paper aims to examine socioeconomic and organizational/system factors affecting patient safety and quality perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was constructed to gather demographic, managerial support, information technology implementation and integration information. Data were collected from nurses in five Riyadh hospitals, Saudi Arabia. Registered nurses working in hospital departments participated in the survey. A total of 566 completed questionnaires were returned. Subsequent data were analyzed through binary logistic regression.

Findings

Factors that improve patient safety and the likelihood that nurses use their own facility include: fewer visible errors; ability to communicate suggestions; information technology support and training; and a confidential error reporting system.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was a cross‐sectional study. Consequently, it is difficult to establish causation. Furthermore, nursing in these hospitals is dominated by foreign nationals. Also, as with all surveys, this research may be subject to response bias. Although the questionnaire was randomly distributed, there were no mechanisms to assure privacy and minimize peer influence. The high positive patient safety perceptions may be influenced by either individual or peer biases.

Practical implications

Nurses are important communicators; especially about hospital safety and quality. The research informs leaders about areas that need considering and improving. Findings indicate that system factors, including functional feedback, suggestions, and error reporting significantly affect patient safety improvements. Likewise, nurse education to operate their information systems has positive effects. Healthcare leaders need to understand factors that affect patient safety perceptions when creating a patient safety culture.

Originality/value

Few international articles examine the factors that influence nurses' patient safety perceptions or examine those factors that affect these perceptions. This paper adds value by researching what influences patient safety perceptions among Riyadh nurses.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Van Mô Dang, Patrice François, Pierre Batailler, Arnaud Seigneurin, Jean-Philippe Vittoz, Elodie Sellier and José Labarère

Medical record represents the main information support used by healthcare providers. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether patient perception of hospital care…

Abstract

Purpose

Medical record represents the main information support used by healthcare providers. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether patient perception of hospital care quality related to compliance with medical-record keeping.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors merged the original data collected as part of a nationwide audit of medical records with overall and subscale perception scores (range 0-100, with higher scores denoting better rating) computed for 191 respondents to a cross-sectional survey of patients discharged from a university hospital.

Findings

The median overall patient perception score was 77 (25th-75th percentiles, 68-87) and differed according to the presence of discharge summary completed within eight days of discharge (81 v. 75, p=0.03 after adjusting for baseline patient and hospital stay characteristics). No independent associations were found between patient perception scores and the documentation of pain assessment and nutritional disorder screening. Yet, medical record-keeping quality was independently associated with higher patient perception scores for the nurses’ interpersonal and technical skills component.

Research limitations/implications

First, this was a single-center study conducted in a large full-teaching hospital and the findings may not apply to other facilities. Second, the analysis might be underpowered to detect small but clinically significant differences in patient perception scores according to compliance with recording standards. Third, the authors could not investigate whether electronic medical record contributed to better compliance with recording standards and eventually higher patient perception scores.

Practical implications

Because of the potential consequences of poor recording for patient safety, further efforts are warranted to improve the accuracy and completeness of documentation in medical records.

Originality/value

A modest relationship exists between the quality of medical-record keeping and patient perception of hospital care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Heather Whitehead, Daryl May and Helen Agahi

If NHS hospitals wish to influence patients to choose them and, as the literature review suggests, cleanliness will be a key‐influencing factor in making that choice, it…

Abstract

Purpose

If NHS hospitals wish to influence patients to choose them and, as the literature review suggests, cleanliness will be a key‐influencing factor in making that choice, it would seem important for hospitals to understand what factors lead people to decide whether a hospital is clean or dirty. The research aims to identify what the key factors are that influence patients' perceptions of cleanliness and to rank these factors in order of importance.

Design/methodology/approach

The project utilised a mixed methodology to collect the data. The hospital staff and people who had been recent patients took part in focus groups in order to gather their views. The current hospital in‐patients were surveyed through the use of a paper questionnaire.

Findings

The main themes that influence the perceptions of cleanliness emerging from the analysis can be summarised under three broad headings – appearance of the environment, physical cleanliness and staff behaviour. The findings suggest that this subject is much more complex than the production of a list. The appearance of the environment is a complex set of perceptions based on what individuals believe to be important, what they observe and what they expect. The research suggests that the appearance of the environment is the most important factor.

Originality/value

The paper starts to explore the factors that influence patient perception of cleanliness and provides practical information to NHS estates and facilities managers.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article

Elizabeth A. Anderson

Evaluates the service quality of four clinics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center using a questionnaire methodology. The SERVQUAL instrument was…

Abstract

Evaluates the service quality of four clinics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center using a questionnaire methodology. The SERVQUAL instrument was administered to patients of the Medical Breast, Leukemia, Medical Gastroenterology and Bone Marrow Aspiration clinics. Results show that, according to the service gap methodology of comparing expectations and perceptions across all four clinics, the issues of billing accuracy and waiting times are deemed by patients as significant problems. In comparing the individual clinics, the Medical Gastroenterology and Leukemia clinics are best performers and the Medical Breast clinic is the worst. However, these differences in performance are due to differences in patients’ expectations of service quality, rather than differences in perceptions. Concludes that customer expectations can have a strong impact on a firm’s evaluation of its service quality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

W. Glynn Mangold and Emin Babakus

Evaluates customers′ and employees′ service quality expectationsand perceptions from the example of a hospital environment. Considersemployees′ responses in administrative…

Abstract

Evaluates customers′ and employees′ service quality expectations and perceptions from the example of a hospital environment. Considers employees′ responses in administrative and nonadministrative categories. Notes differences between the groups and discusses the managerial implications arising from the differences found. Includes a detailed description of the methodology involved in the study.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Fayek N. Youssef

Hospitals provide the same type of service, but they do not all provide the same quality of service. No one knows this better than patients. Reports the results of a…

Abstract

Hospitals provide the same type of service, but they do not all provide the same quality of service. No one knows this better than patients. Reports the results of a market research exercise initiated to ascertain the different factors which patients of health care identify as being necessary to provide error‐free service quality with NHS hospitals. To measure patients’ satisfaction with NHS hospitals, the internationally‐used market research technique called SERVQUAL was used in order to measure patients’ expectations before admission, record their perceptions after discharge from the hospital, and then to close the gap between them. This technique compares expectations with perceptions of service received across five broad dimensions of service quality, namely; tangibility; reliability: responsiveness; assurance; and empathy. This analysis covered 174 patients who had completed the SERVQUAL questionnaire, including patients who had had treatment in surgical, orthopaedic, spinal injury, medicinal, dental and other specialties in the West Midlands region. Recorded the average weighted NHS service quality score overall for the five dimensions as significantly negative.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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