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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Sandra Catherine Buttigieg, Prasanta Kumar Dey and Mary Rose Cassar

The purpose of this paper is to develop an integrated patient-focused analytical framework to improve quality of care in accident and emergency (A & E) unit of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an integrated patient-focused analytical framework to improve quality of care in accident and emergency (A & E) unit of a Maltese hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a case study approach. First, a thorough literature review has been undertaken to study the various methods of healthcare quality management. Second, a healthcare quality management framework is developed using combined quality function deployment (QFD) and logical framework approach (LFA). Third, the proposed framework is applied to a Maltese hospital to demonstrate its effectiveness. The proposed framework has six steps, commencing with identifying patients’ requirements and concluding with implementing improvement projects. All the steps have been undertaken with the involvement of the concerned stakeholders in the A & E unit of the hospital.

Findings

The major and related problems being faced by the hospital under study were overcrowding at A & E and shortage of beds, respectively. The combined framework ensures better A & E services and patient flow. QFD identifies and analyses the issues and challenges of A & E and LFA helps develop project plans for healthcare quality improvement. The important outcomes of implementing the proposed quality improvement programme are fewer hospital admissions, faster patient flow, expert triage and shorter waiting times at the A & E unit. Increased emergency consultant cover and faster first significant medical encounter were required to start addressing the problems effectively. Overall, the combined QFD and LFA method is effective to address quality of care in A & E unit.

Practical/implications

The proposed framework can be easily integrated within any healthcare unit, as well as within entire healthcare systems, due to its flexible and user-friendly approach. It could be part of Six Sigma and other quality initiatives.

Originality/value

Although QFD has been extensively deployed in healthcare setup to improve quality of care, very little has been researched on combining QFD and LFA in order to identify issues, prioritise them, derive improvement measures and implement improvement projects. Additionally, there is no research on QFD application in A & E. This paper bridges these gaps. Moreover, very little has been written on the Maltese health care system. Therefore, this study contributes demonstration of quality of emergency care in Malta.

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Eva Söderström, Nomie Eriksson and Rose-Mharie Åhlfeldt

– The purpose of this paper is to analyze two case studies with a trust matrix tool, to identify trust issues related to electronic health records.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze two case studies with a trust matrix tool, to identify trust issues related to electronic health records.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach is applied using two case studies. The data analysis of these studies generated a problem list, which was mapped to a trust matrix.

Findings

Results demonstrate flaws in current practices and point to achieving balance between organizational, person and technology trust perspectives. The analysis revealed three challenge areas, to: achieve higher trust in patient-focussed healthcare; improve communication between patients and healthcare professionals; and establish clear terminology. By taking trust into account, a more holistic perspective on healthcare can be achieved, where trust can be obtained and optimized.

Research limitations/implications

A trust matrix is tested and shown to identify trust problems on different levels and relating to trusting beliefs. Future research should elaborate and more fully address issues within three identified challenge areas.

Practical implications

The trust matrix’s usefulness as a tool for organizations to analyze trust problems and issues is demonstrated.

Originality/value

Healthcare trust issues are captured to a greater extent and from previously unchartered perspectives.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Kathy L Rush, Nelly D Oelke, R. Colin Reid, Carol Laberge, Frank Halperin and Mary Kjorven

Older adults with atrial fibrillation (AF) have put growing demands on a poorly integrated healthcare system. This is of particular concern in rural communities with rapid…

Abstract

Purpose

Older adults with atrial fibrillation (AF) have put growing demands on a poorly integrated healthcare system. This is of particular concern in rural communities with rapid population aging and few healthcare resources elevating risk of stroke and mortality. The purpose of this paper is to explore healthcare delivery risks for rural older adults with AF.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study collected data from AF patients, healthcare providers and decision makers. Ten patients participated in six-month care journeys involving interviews, logs, photos, and chart reviews. In total, 13 different patients and ten healthcare providers participated in focus groups and two decision makers participated in interviews.

Findings

Three key health service risks emerged: lack of patient-focussed access and self-management; unplanned care coordination and follow-up across the continuum of care; and ineffective teamwork with variable perspectives among patients, providers, and decision makers.

Originality/value

This study extends the understanding of risks to the health system level. Results provide important information for further research aimed at interventions to improve health service delivery and policy change to mitigate risks for this population.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Anna Essén, Sara Winterstorm Värlander and Karina T. Liljedal

Many scholars have urged firms to empower consumers to become co-producers, arguing that this empowerment leads to a win-win situation that benefits consumers and…

Abstract

Purpose

Many scholars have urged firms to empower consumers to become co-producers, arguing that this empowerment leads to a win-win situation that benefits consumers and providers alike. However, critical voices have emphasised that co-production is a way to exploit rather than empower consumers and hence represents a win–lose idea that benefits providers only. Regrettably, these polarised positions remain disconnected and lack empirical investigation. The aim of the present study is to move the debate beyond this stalemate by integrating these perspectives using an empirical study to explore enabling and constraining implications of the attempts to “empower” consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a qualitative empirical study of an internationally unique example of a long-term co-production process in rheumatology care. Data were collected using both focused interviews and observations.

Findings

The study indicates that both the optimistic and the critical perspectives of co-production are valid and the implications of “empowering” consumers are two-edged.

Research Limitations/implications

The study highlights the need to zoom in and analyse how empowering and disempowering mechanisms relate to specific aspects of particular co-production processes rather than to co-production as a general phenomenon.

Practical Implications

The empirical data illustrate the feasibility of employing patients in everyday healthcare production through simple means while raising numerous issues related to, for example, traditional healthcare roles and process design.

Originality/value

The present study of a unique, long-term co-production illustrates how both perspectives of co-production are valid.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Abraham B. (Rami) Shani and Susan Albers Mohrman

This chapter provides a reflective synopsis of six cases focused on making healthcare sustainable. The nature and value of an ecosystem perspective is explored. The intent…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides a reflective synopsis of six cases focused on making healthcare sustainable. The nature and value of an ecosystem perspective is explored. The intent is to apply and generate organizational knowledge to understand and guide purposeful design and learning.

Design/methodology

From five countries where healthcare is organized differently, these cases illuminate particular approaches to develop the capabilities for healthcare to deliver greater value to society. Each case is examined through the lens of an appropriate theoretical perspective. This chapter reports the themes that were common in the six case studies.

Findings

New approaches are changing the connections in the healthcare ecosystem, including the flows of: medical knowledge, clinical information, and resources. Common themes include: the importance of networks in the emerging healthcare ecosystem; the role of governance mechanisms and leadership to align the diverse ecosystem components; the engagement of dominant ecosystem actors; the need for adaptive change capabilities, and for multi-stakeholder research collaborations to generate actionable knowledge.

Practical implications

Taking an ecosystem perspective enables healthcare leaders to broaden their conceptualization of the changes that will be required to be sustainable in a changing society.

Social implications

Almost every man, woman and child is affected by the healthcare system. Increasing the sustainability of healthcare is integral to increasing societal sustainability overall.

Originality

Viewing the ecosystem as the appropriate focus of purposeful change departs from a traditional approach that focuses on the effectiveness of each element.

Details

Reconfiguring the Ecosystem for Sustainable Healthcare
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-035-3

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2020

Gyan Prakash and Shefali Srivastava

The purpose of this paper is to explore the antecedents and consequences of a value-dense environment in healthcare service delivery.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the antecedents and consequences of a value-dense environment in healthcare service delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural model was developed based on a literature review. Circulation of a 31-indicator questionnaire among service receivers in the healthcare system across India generated 279 valid responses. The research model was assessed using a cross-sectional research design, and the data were analyzed by partial least squares-structural equation modeling.

Findings

Integrated supply chain performance (ISCP), internal service quality (ISQ) and coordinated care are antecedents of a value-dense environment, which drives patient-centricity. The leagile supply chain strategy strengthens the relationship between ISCP and coordinated care. Employee trust and commitment acts as a moderator between coordinated care and ISQ.

Research limitations/implications

By adopting the perspective of service receivers, this paper highlights the influence of value-density on patient-centricity in healthcare organizations. Future research should include healthcare professionals’ perceptions of value-dense environment creation.

Practical implications

The study provides suggestions to practitioners for designing patient-centric healthcare services by leveraging ISCP, coordinated care and ISQ in the value-creation process. Recognizing the relationships among these constructs can aid the timely formulation of corrective actions and future policies.

Social implications

This study underscores patient-centric care as a basis for effectively delivering healthcare as a social good.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the body of knowledge by identifying and empirically validating the relationships between patient-centricity and value co-creation.

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Masood A. Badri, Samaa Attia and Abdulla M. Ustadi

The purpose of this article is to present a comprehensive structural equation based service quality and patient satisfaction model taking into account the patient's…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to present a comprehensive structural equation based service quality and patient satisfaction model taking into account the patient's condition before and after discharge. The authors aim to test for causality in a sample of patients from United Arab Emirates public hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using questionnaires completed by adults discharged (n=244) from UAE public hospitals. The proposed model consists of five main constructs. Three represent service quality: quality of care (four variables); process and administration (four variables) and information (four variables). There is also one construct that represents patient's status (two variables – health status before admission and after discharge). Finally, there is one construct that represents patient's satisfaction with care (two variables – general and relative satisfaction). Structural equation modeling and LISREL using maximum likelihood estimation was used to test hypothesized model(s)/parameters(s) derived deductively from the literature.

Findings

The structural equation modeling representation provides a comprehensive picture that allows healthcare constructs and patient satisfaction causality to be tested. The goodness‐of‐fit statistics supported the healthcare quality‐patient status‐satisfaction model.

Originality/value

The model has been found to capture attributes that characterize healthcare quality in a developing country and could represent other modern healthcare systems. Also, it can be used to evaluate other healthcare practices from patients' viewpoints. The study highlights the importance of healthcare quality as patient satisfaction predictors by capturing other effects such as patient status.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Gangaraju Vanteddu and Charles D. McAllister

The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrated framework to simultaneously identify and improve healthcare processes that are important from the healthcare

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrated framework to simultaneously identify and improve healthcare processes that are important from the healthcare provider's and patient's perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

A modified quality function deployment (QFD) chart is introduced to the field of healthcare quality assurance. A healthcare service example is used to demonstrate the utility of the proposed chart.

Findings

The proposed framework is versatile and can be used in a wide variety of healthcare quality improvement contexts, wherein, two different perspectives are needed to be considered for identifying and improving critical healthcare processes.

Practical implications

The modified QFD chart used in conjunction with the stacked Pareto chart will facilitate the identification of key performance metrics from the patient's and the hospital's perspectives. Subsequently, the chief contributory factors at different levels are identified in a very efficient manner.

Originality/value

Healthcare quality improvement professionals will be able to use the proposed modified QFD chart in association with stacked Pareto chart for effective quality assurance.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Anders Melin and Jan‐Åke Granath

How will the relationship between patients, the service level and the geographic conditions in healthcare develop in the future? The task will be of great impact for…

Abstract

How will the relationship between patients, the service level and the geographic conditions in healthcare develop in the future? The task will be of great impact for location of new properties and the use of existing healthcare buildings. In order to improve healthcare space requirements, it is important to understand the expression “horizontal integrated care”. Defining terms will enhance the communication between providers, companies and individuals. The research also looks into the phenomenon of “local hospital”. The first step is to analyse these terms and describe the definitions from collected material obtained by a questionnaire, interviews and searches on the Web. The main issue is to give the conception a broad validity. This study gives a definition that can be shared by most parties in healthcare today and will enhance the communication in healthcare issues.

Details

Facilities, vol. 22 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 February 2010

Rebecca K. Givan, Ariel Avgar and Mingwei Liu

This paper examines the relationship between human resource practices in 173 hospitals in the United Kingdom and four organizational outcome categories – clinical…

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between human resource practices in 173 hospitals in the United Kingdom and four organizational outcome categories – clinical, financial, employee attitudes and perceptions, and patient attitudes and perceptions. The overarching proposition set forth and examined in this paper is that human resource management (HRM) practices and delivery of care practices have varied effects on each of these outcomes. More specifically, the authors set forth the proposition that specific practices will have positive effects on one outcome category while simultaneously having a negative effect on other performance outcomes, broadly defined.

The paper introduces a broader stakeholder framework for assessing the HR–performance relationship in the healthcare setting. This multi-dimensional framework incorporates the effects of human resource practices on customers (patients), management, and frontline staff and can also be applied to other sectors such as manufacturing. This approach acknowledges the potential for incompatibilities between stakeholder performance objectives. In the healthcare industry specifically, our framework broadens the notion of performance.

Overall, our results provide support for the proposition that different stakeholders will be affected differently by the use of managerial practices. We believe that the findings reported in this paper highlight the importance of examining multiple stakeholder outcomes associated with managerial practices and the need to identify the inherent trade-offs associated with their adoption.

Details

Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-932-9

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