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1 – 10 of over 10000
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Stephen Tee

Primary care groups (PCGs) and primary care trusts (PCTs) are required to ensure that patient and public involvement underpins all activity. In Part 1, the literature…

Abstract

Primary care groups (PCGs) and primary care trusts (PCTs) are required to ensure that patient and public involvement underpins all activity. In Part 1, the literature review revealed many challenges to implementing this important measure of performance that would test those with responsibility for achieving a meaningful outcome for all stakeholders. Part 2 reports on a local study that used qualitative data from key stakeholders to examine how one PCG was responding to the involvement agenda. The findings revealed cynicism and doubt among board members about the purpose and value of involvement, despite which some progress had been made in engaging with local voluntary groups. However, the experience of involvement among local patients had not always been a positive one. It is suggested that issues of power and organisational culture will need to be tackled through greater investment in clinical and managerial staff development.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Jessie Cunnett

Exploring a brief history of patient and public involvement as a pathway to the present, the article considers whether we are close to achieving a system of public

117

Abstract

Exploring a brief history of patient and public involvement as a pathway to the present, the article considers whether we are close to achieving a system of public engagement in health and social care that can be truly held to account as enabling people to influence the decisions that affect their lives. Considering the most recent legislation and in particular local involvement networks the article looks more closely at ‘quality’ in public involvement and focuses on how we can work together through personal responsibility to achieve it.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Jill Murie and Gerrie Douglas‐Scott

This paper summarises five years' experience of patient and public involvement in primary care, citing examples from the Lanark practice and Clydesdale Local Health Care…

2166

Abstract

This paper summarises five years' experience of patient and public involvement in primary care, citing examples from the Lanark practice and Clydesdale Local Health Care Co‐operative (LHCC) in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Strategic development and models which align primary care structures within a framework for patient and public involvement are described, along with barriers to implementation. Examples derived from clinical governance, health promotion and needs assessment include patient and carer involvement in significant event analysis and audit, joint training and patient‐held record cards. Positive outcomes reported are effective dialogue between health professionals, patients and the public, service developments and quality improvements. The success of initiatives is retrospectively assessed against the Audit Commission's critical success factors.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Alison Baker

The purpose of this paper is to consider the issues which emerge when an autonomous, professional, member‐led organisation attempts to demonstrate its accountability to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the issues which emerge when an autonomous, professional, member‐led organisation attempts to demonstrate its accountability to patients through lay involvement in its standard‐setting processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports a project, which is still in progress and could be described as action research. Data were collected through participant observation in a series of discussions and working groups. A limited literature search was carried out at the start of the initiative but found little which relates to lay involvement in professional bodies.

Findings

The paper finds that patient involvement in a professional body is unlikely by itself to be a useful mechanism for delivering greater professional accountability.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is a single case study and can only suggest hypotheses for further research.

Practical implications

The paper shows that professional bodies of various types are increasingly being asked to demonstrate public involvement in their decision making. It is important to identify the most effective mechanisms for this and the limitations inherent in the structures of organisations, which are accountable primarily to their members.

Originality/value

The paper shows that individual doctors are held to account through a number of mechanisms, but little attention has been given to how medical professional bodies can be made more accountable for the collective power they hold. Patient involvement is interpreted within a consumerist model, which focuses on the doctor‐patient relationship and ignores the considerable strategic influence which medical royal colleges exercise within the health service.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 21 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Stephen Tee

Primary care groups are required to demonstrate that patients and the public are involved in the planning, delivery and evaluation of the services they provide. However, a…

Abstract

Primary care groups are required to demonstrate that patients and the public are involved in the planning, delivery and evaluation of the services they provide. However, a review of the literature suggests that managers' ability will be greatly tested if they are to achieve meaningful progress in this area. Some suggestions are made to assist managers in this important role. In the next issue of MCC, Part 2 reports findings from a locality case study.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2009

Anna Coleman, Kath Checkland and Stephen Harrison

With the recent publication of The Engagement Cycle (DH, 2009a), exploring the issues surrounding patient and public involvement (PPI) in World Class Commissioning, it…

Abstract

With the recent publication of The Engagement Cycle (DH, 2009a), exploring the issues surrounding patient and public involvement (PPI) in World Class Commissioning, it seems timely to look at how this type of involvement/engagement has developed in recent years. Set against official rhetoric that emphasises the importance of PPI in the NHS, this paper is informed by evidence emerging from a three‐year research project into the development of practice‐based commissioning conducted at Manchester University. It is suggested that commissioners (primary care trusts and practice‐based commissioners) need to think deeply about the meaning of public involvement in their context, while at national level strategies should be flexible enough to allow a diversity of approaches which may ultimately allow PPI to flourish.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Virginia Minogue and John Girdlestone

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of service user and carer involvement in NHS research and describe the nature of this involvement in three specialist…

1911

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of service user and carer involvement in NHS research and describe the nature of this involvement in three specialist mental health Trusts. It also aims to discuss the value of service user and carer involvement and present the perspective of the service user and research manager.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews patient and public involvement policy and practice in the NHS and NHS research. It examines the effectiveness of involvement activity and utilises a case example to demonstrate the impact of patient/service user involvement on the NHS and the individuals who take part.

Findings

The paper concludes that service user involvement is essential if research is to support the development of health services that clearly reflect the needs of the service user and impact positively on service quality.

Practical implications

Service user involvement is an established element of NHS research and development at both national and local level. The Department of Health strategy for research, Best Research for Best Health, reiterates both the importance of research that benefits the patient and the involvement of the service user in the research process. Despite this, the changes in Department of Health support funding for research, introduced by the strategy, may inadvertently lead to some NHS Trusts experiencing difficulty in resourcing this important activity.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates the effectiveness of successful patient and public involvement in research. It also identifies how involvement has developed in a fragmented and uncoordinated way and how it is threatened by a failure to embed it more consistently in research infrastructure.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Catarina Samorinha, Mateusz Lichon, Susana Silva and Mike Dent

The purpose of this paper is to compare user involvement in the case of assisted reproductive technologies in England and Portugal through the concepts of voice, choice and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare user involvement in the case of assisted reproductive technologies in England and Portugal through the concepts of voice, choice and co-production, assessing the implications for user empowerment.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study draws primarily on policy review and uses exploratory semi-structured interviews with key informants as a way of illustrating points. Data on the following themes was compared: voice (users’ representativeness on licensing bodies and channels of communication between users and doctors); choice (funding and accessibility criteria; choice of fertility centres, doctors and level of care); and co-production (criteria through which users actively engage with health professionals in planning the treatment).

Findings

Inter- and intra-healthcare systems variations between the two countries on choice and co-production were identified. Differences between funding and accessibility, regions, public and private sectors and attitudes towards doctor-patient relationship (paternalistic/partnership) were the key issues. Although consumer choice and indicators of co-production are evident in treatment pathways in both countries, user empowerment is not. This is limited by inequalities in accessibility criteria, dependence on doctors’ individual perspectives and lack of genuine and formal hearing of citizens’ voice.

Originality/value

Enhancing users’ involvement claims for individual and organizational cultures reflecting user-centred values. Effective ways to incorporate users’ knowledge in shared decision making and co-design are needed to empower patients and to improve the delivery of care.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2013

Gianluca Veronesi and Kevin Keasey

Purpose – The chapter aims to understand what kind of policy approach has been more successful in facilitating the involvement of patients and the public in the design and

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter aims to understand what kind of policy approach has been more successful in facilitating the involvement of patients and the public in the design and provision of health-care services at the local level and the explanatory factors justifying the implementation outcome.Methodology – By applying Richard Matland's ambiguity/conflict policy implementation model, the chapter analyses the impact of a number of policies introduced after 1997 in the English National Health Service that targeted final users and the local population in decision-making processes.Findings – The evidence shows that policies emphasising the importance of context-specific contingencies can be more effectively implemented when room for interpretation and discretion in selecting the appropriate means for involvement is given. In this way, the overall aims/purposes of health policies can be locally reshaped by allowing the adoption of flexible strategies within the implementation process.Practical implications – A strong leadership at the top of public sector organisations and, in particular, from the board of directors is needed to steer and facilitate a consensus oriented outcome in organisational decision-making processes that aim to incorporate the views and opinions of patients and the public.Social implications – Local initiatives in increasing participation, for specific purposes, are bound to be more successful than a general initiative, expecting comparatively uniform implementation.

Details

Conceptualizing and Researching Governance in Public and Non-Profit Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-657-6

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Virginia Minogue, Bill Wells and Ashley Brooks

Reducing waste in health care can result in savings that could be used to meet the projected shortfall in NHS funding or to meet the care needs of vulnerable groups…

506

Abstract

Purpose

Reducing waste in health care can result in savings that could be used to meet the projected shortfall in NHS funding or to meet the care needs of vulnerable groups. Patients and their families can contribute to the identification and reduction of waste. To do so their understanding of the costs of health care and treatment needs to be increased. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach formed part of the Close Partnering work stream of the NHS Future Focused Finance (FFF) programme. Included in this was a review of the literature relating to waste reduction, patient engagement and reference to experts in the field of public and patient engagement. Engagement of the patient voice in the NHS FFF programme to provide the patient perspective and engage in discussions with patients. Discussions with experts in patient and public involvement and clinicians were also undertaken.

Findings

The public and patients have little awareness of NHS finances and generally perceive efforts to reduce costs and achieve efficiencies as impacting on the quality of care. Engaging the public and patients in discussions about the costs of health care is challenging and existing methodologies for patient and public engagement may not be appropriate for what could be termed difficult conversations.

Social implications

Increasing patient awareness of the costs of health care and treatment may result in patients and the public demanding greater involvement in decisions about health care expenditure and use of resources.

Originality/value

Difficult conversations with patients and the public about the costs of health and their role in reducing waste are rarely invited. This paper brings to the fore the issues and challenges that such discussions engender.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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