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Article

Ghasem Abedi, Ghahraman Mahmoodi, Roya Malekzadeh, Zeinab Khodaei, Yibeltal Siraneh Belete and Edris Hasanpoor

The regulation defines patients’ rights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patients’ rights accepted in…

Abstract

Purpose

The regulation defines patients’ rights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patients’ rights accepted in international texts. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between patients’ safety, medical errors and patients’ safety rights with patients’ security feeling in selected hospitals of Mazandaran Province, Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in selected hospitals of Mazandaran Province in public, social and private hospitals in 2016. In total, 1,083 patients were randomly selected for the study. The developed tool (questionnaire) was used for data collection. Questionnaire validity was verified through experts and its reliability was confirmed by Cronbach’s α coefficient (95 percent). Data were analyzed through multiple regressions by SPSS software (version 21).

Findings

The findings of this paper showed that the mean (standard deviation) medical error, patient’s safety, patient’s rights and patient’s security feeling were 2.50±0.61, 2.22±0.67, 2.11±0.68 and 2.73±0.63, respectively. Correlation testing results showed that medical error, patient’s safety and patient’s rights simultaneously had a significant relation with patient’s security feeling in the selected hospitals (p<0.05).

Originality/value

A simultaneous correlation between patient’s safety, patient’s rights and medical errors with patient’s security feeling in social security hospitals was higher than other hospitals. Hence, the authorities and officials of hospitals and healthcare centers were advised to make effective attempts to perceive the patient’s safety, medical errors and patient’s rights to improve the patient’s security feeling and calmness and also to make better decisions to promote the healthcare and therapeutic services.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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Article

Aimee van Wynsberghe

With the rapid and pervasive introduction of robots into human environments, ethics scholars along with roboticists are asking how ethics can be applied to the discipline…

Abstract

Purpose

With the rapid and pervasive introduction of robots into human environments, ethics scholars along with roboticists are asking how ethics can be applied to the discipline of robotics. The purpose of this paper is to provide a concrete example of incorporating ethics into the design process of a robot in healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach for including ethics in the design process of care robots used in this paper is called the Care‐Centered Value Sensitive Design (CCVSD) approach. The CCVSD approach presented here provides both an outline of the components demanding ethical attention as well as a step‐by‐step manner in which such considerations may proceed in a prospective manner throughout the design process of a robot. This begins from the moment of idea generation and continues throughout the design of various prototypes. In this paper, this approach's utility and prospective methodology are illustrated by proposing a novel care robot, the “wee‐bot”, for the collection and testing of urine samples in a hospital context.

Findings

The results of applying the CCVSD approach inspired the design of a novel robot for the testing of urine in pediatric oncology patients – the “wee‐bot” robot – and showed that it is possible to successfully incorporate ethics into the design of a care robot by exploring and prescribing design requirements. In other words, the use of the CCVSD approach allowed for the translation of ethical values into technical design requirements as was shown in this paper.

Practical implications

This paper provides a practical solution to the question of how to incorporate ethics into the design of robots and bridges the gap between the work of roboticists and robot ethicists so that they may work together in the design of a novel care robot.

Social implications

In providing a solution to the issue of how to address ethical issues in the design of robots, the aim is to mitigate issues of societal concern regarding the design, development and implementation of robots in healthcare.

Originality/value

This paper is the first and only presentation of a concrete prospective methodology for including ethics into the design of robots. While the example given here is tailored to the healthcare context, the approach can be adjusted to fit another context and/or robot design.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article

Jan M. Myszewski and Madhav Sinha

The purpose of this paper is to find determinants of the effectiveness of the business improvement processes that create value for services offered to patients in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find determinants of the effectiveness of the business improvement processes that create value for services offered to patients in healthcare industries. The words patients and customers are used interchangeably throughout without any distinction. The features that distinguish medical services of different types and their inter-related factors are examined. The aim is to come up with a model of value vs cost that can help healthcare managers examine and use this exercise as an example of improvement micro-projects to help reduce cost and eliminate the patient’s dissatisfaction gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

The list of factors or attributes influencing the creation of value of a given medical process or a single procedure is described. The factors in the value creation are examined that will help in the categories for the risk analysis to determine the value-added benefits for the patient outcome. The cost analysis is approached from two angles to include: the cost of the service, and the costs of poor quality of service.

Findings

The model describes the value for the patient satisfaction depending on the quality level or grade of the treatment or procedures used and the cost factor. The analysis is done at several levels with special reference to case examples. A search for various analogous models in similar service providing situation used in business process management of other process types is highlighted and discussed.

Originality/value

The model is an interesting generic illustration for considering value vs cost in all patient care strategies. It enables the position of various medical procedures that can be applied to the same disease in order to keep the variations as minimum as possible within the quality control specification limits. The importance in different aspects of check-points or hold points for inspection is also discussed.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Book part

Soo-Hoon Lee, Thomas W. Lee and Phillip H. Phan

Workplace voice is well-established and encompasses behaviors such as prosocial voice, informal complaints, grievance filing, and whistleblowing, and it focuses on…

Abstract

Workplace voice is well-established and encompasses behaviors such as prosocial voice, informal complaints, grievance filing, and whistleblowing, and it focuses on interactions between the employee and supervisor or the employee and the organizational collective. In contrast, our chapter focuses on employee prosocial advocacy voice (PAV), which the authors define as prosocial voice behaviors aimed at preventing harm or promoting constructive changes by advocating on behalf of others. In the context of a healthcare organization, low quality and unsafe patient care are salient and objectionable states in which voice can motivate actions on behalf of the patient to improve information exchanges, governance, and outreach activities for safer outcomes. The authors draw from the theory and research on responsibility to intersect with theories on information processing, accountability, and stakeholders that operate through voice between the employee-patient, employee-coworker, and employee-profession, respectively, to propose a model of PAV in patient-centered healthcare. The authors complete the model by suggesting intervening influences and barriers to PAV that may affect patient-centered outcomes.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

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Article

Quinton Nottingham, Dana M. Johnson and Roberta Russell

Pressure from competition; inflexible third-party reimbursements; greater demand from government, regulatory and certifying agencies; discerning patients; and the quest of…

Abstract

Purpose

Pressure from competition; inflexible third-party reimbursements; greater demand from government, regulatory and certifying agencies; discerning patients; and the quest of healthcare entities for greater profitably place demands and high expectations for service quality impacting overall patient experience. Extending a prior multivariate, single-period model of varied medical practices predicting patient experience to a three-year time period to understand whether there was a change in overall assessment using data analytics. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

SEM was employed on a per year and aggregated, three-year basis to gain insights into qualitative psychometric constructs predicting overall patient experience and strength of the relationships.

Findings

Statistically significant differences were uncovered between years indicating the strength of the relationships of latent variables on overall performance.

Research limitations/implications

Study focused on data gathered from a questionnaire mailed to patients who visited various outpatient medical clinics in a rural community with over 4,000 responses during the three-year study period. A higher percentage of female respondents over the age of 45 may limit the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

Practitioners can gain a broader understanding of different factors influencing overall patient experience. Administrative processes associated with the primary care provider are inconsequential. Patients are not as concerned with patient flow as they are with patient safety and health.

Originality/value

This research informs healthcare quality management of psychometrics and analytics to improve the overall patient experience in outpatient medical clinics.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article

Yuan-Han Huang and Anand K. Gramopadhye

The purpose of this paper is to investigate violations against work standards associated with using a new health information technology (HIT) system. Relevant…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate violations against work standards associated with using a new health information technology (HIT) system. Relevant recommendations for implementing HIT in rural hospitals are provided and discussed to achieve meaningful use.

Design/methodology/approach

An observational study is conducted to map medication administration process while using a HIT system in a rural hospital. Follow-up focus groups are held to determine and verify potential adverse factors related to using the HIT system while passing drugs to patients.

Findings

A detailed task analysis demonstrated several violations, such as only relying on the barcode scanning system to match up with patient and drugs could potentially result in the medical staff forgetting to provide drug information verbally before administering drugs. There was also a lack of regulated and clear work procedure in using the new HIT system. In addition, the computer system controls and displays could not be adjusted so as to satisfy the users’ expectations. Nurses prepared medications and documentation in an environment that was prone to interruptions.

Originality/value

Recommendations for implementing a HIT system in rural healthcare facilities can be categorized into five areas: people, tasks, tools, environment, and organization. Detailed remedial measures are provided for achieving continuous process improvements at resource-limited healthcare facilities in rural areas.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article

Jason Scott, Yvonne Birks, Fiona Aspinal and Justin Waring

Keeping individuals safe from harm and exploitation is a clearly articulated goal within both the health and social care sectors. Two key concepts associated with…

Abstract

Purpose

Keeping individuals safe from harm and exploitation is a clearly articulated goal within both the health and social care sectors. Two key concepts associated with achieving this common aim are safety and safeguarding. The purpose of this paper is to critically appraise the differences in safety terminology used in health and social care, including opportunities and challenges for greater integration of safety systems across health and social care in England.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the authors’ viewpoint based on personal, professional and research experience.

Findings

In healthcare, safety is usually conceptualised as the management of error, with risk considered on a universal level. In social care, the safeguarding process balances choice and control with individualised approaches to keeping adults safe, but lacks the established reporting pathways to capture safety incidents. Efforts to safely integrate health and social care services are currently constrained by a lack of shared understanding of the concepts of safety and safeguarding without further consideration of how these approaches to keeping people safe can be better aligned. As such, there is a need for a single, unified discourse of patient safety that cuts across the patient safety and safeguarding concepts and their associated frameworks in health and social care settings.

Originality/value

A single unified concept of safety in health and social care could coincide with an integrated approach to the delivery of health and social care, improving the care of patients transitioning between services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article

Sheree Louise Green

This article aims to outline simple measures which, by making better use of existing legislation and provision, could change the day‐to‐day experience of individuals with…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to outline simple measures which, by making better use of existing legislation and provision, could change the day‐to‐day experience of individuals with learning disabilities currently in long stay hospitals, whilst phased local provision is being sourced for them. The proposals will also promote the safety and dignity of the minority of patients who ultimately cannot be settled successfully within their own community. Further, these measures may help ensure that any individual undergoing assessment and treatment at such a unit, for whatever period, and for whatever reason, will receive care in an environment where abuse cannot go unnoticed or unchecked.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a review of the potential to use current legislation and provision to better effect, highlighted by case studies.

Findings

Commissioners contracting with providers could include measures to promote the safety and protection of adults with learning disabilities from abuse at little or no cost to the commissioning authority.

Originality/value

This is an original piece of work – developed from a short opinion/comment piece (750 words) originally prepared for the benefit of mental health lawyers in the Law Society Gazette. It is primarily of value, however, to social workers, care providers, adult safeguarding teams, advocacy services and commissioners of services.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Book part

Kimberly A. Galt, Karen A. Paschal, Amy Abbott, Andjela Drincic, Mark V. Siracuse, James D. Bramble and Ann M. Rule

This mixed methods multiple case study examines the knowledge, understanding, and awareness of 25 health board/facility oversight managers and 20 health professional…

Abstract

This mixed methods multiple case study examines the knowledge, understanding, and awareness of 25 health board/facility oversight managers and 20 health professional association directors about privacy and security issues important to achieving health information exchange (HIE) in the state of Nebraska. Within case analyses revealed that health board/facility oversight managers were unaware of key elements of the federal agenda; their concerns about privacy encompassed broad definitions both of what constituted a “health record” and “regulations centeredness.” Alternatively, health professional association leaders were keenly aware of national initiatives. Despite concerns about HIE, they supported information exchange believing that patient care quality and safety would improve. Cross-case analyses revealed a perceptual disconnect between board/facility oversight managers and professional association leaders; however, both favored HIE. Understanding state-level stakeholder perceptions helps us further understand our progress toward achieving the national health information interoperability goal. There is an ongoing need to assure adequate patient privacy protection. Licensure and facility boards at the state level are likely to have a major role in the assurance of patient protections through facility oversight and provider behavior. The need for these boards to take an active role in oversight of patient rights and protections is imminent. Similarly, professional associations are the major vehicles for post-graduate education of practicing health professionals. Their engagement is essential to maintaining health professions knowledge. States will need to understand and engage both of these key stakeholders to make substantial progress in moving the HIE agenda forward.

Details

Patient Safety and Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-955-5

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