Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ghasem Abedi, Ghahraman Mahmoodi, Roya Malekzadeh, Zeinab Khodaei, Yibeltal Siraneh Belete and Edris Hasanpoor

The regulation defines patients’ rights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patients’ rights accepted in…

Abstract

Purpose

The regulation defines patients’ rights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patients’ rights accepted in international texts. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between patients’ safety, medical errors and patients’ safety rights with patients’ security feeling in selected hospitals of Mazandaran Province, Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in selected hospitals of Mazandaran Province in public, social and private hospitals in 2016. In total, 1,083 patients were randomly selected for the study. The developed tool (questionnaire) was used for data collection. Questionnaire validity was verified through experts and its reliability was confirmed by Cronbach’s α coefficient (95 percent). Data were analyzed through multiple regressions by SPSS software (version 21).

Findings

The findings of this paper showed that the mean (standard deviation) medical error, patient’s safety, patient’s rights and patient’s security feeling were 2.50±0.61, 2.22±0.67, 2.11±0.68 and 2.73±0.63, respectively. Correlation testing results showed that medical error, patient’s safety and patient’s rights simultaneously had a significant relation with patient’s security feeling in the selected hospitals (p<0.05).

Originality/value

A simultaneous correlation between patient’s safety, patient’s rights and medical errors with patient’s security feeling in social security hospitals was higher than other hospitals. Hence, the authorities and officials of hospitals and healthcare centers were advised to make effective attempts to perceive the patient’s safety, medical errors and patient’s rights to improve the patient’s security feeling and calmness and also to make better decisions to promote the healthcare and therapeutic services.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Gholam Reza Sharifzadeh, DJavad Ghoddoosi-Nejad, Susan Behdani, Elaheh Haghgoshayie, Yibeltal Siraneh and Edris Hasanpoor

The Iranian patients’ rights charter defines patient rights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patient…

Abstract

Purpose

The Iranian patients’ rights charter defines patient rights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patient rights accepted in international texts. The purpose of this paper is to study the way in which diabetes patients’ rights are being exercised in everyday hospital practice in Birjand, Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study design was used in 2014. The sample size was estimated 150 patients, out of which 108 diabetes patients completed questionnaire. The questionnaire of diabetes patients’ perspectives on the patients’ rights was used to collect data. The questionnaire consists of 22 questions. Data entry and analysis were carried out using SPSS software (version 22). Descriptive and inferential statistics were calculated with all survey items and total scores, as well as demographic data.

Findings

The response rate was 72 percent. Overall, the mean score percentage of diabetes patients’ perspectives on the patients’ rights was 74.04± 8.4. Furthermore, statistical significant differences were found among diabetes patients in relation to patients’ perspectives on the patients’ rights according to highest level of education (F=16.52, p=0.002), their habitat(t=3.49, p=0.001), age groups (F=18.70, p=0.0001) and the duration of the disease (F=5.16, p=0.007). The results showed that no statistically significant differences were observed among diabetes patients in relation to diabetes patients’ perspectives on the patients’ rights according to their gender (F=1.57, p=0.12) and marital status (F=1.56, p=0.09).

Originality/value

Clinicians can provide care based on patients’ rights, and their knowledge of patients’ rights needs to be evaluated. Educational courses, leaflets, booklets and posters can be helpful in this regard. In addition, professional organizations and the Ministry of Health need to be more sensitive to this issue.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Roger Kiska

The purpose of this paper is to determine the appropriate legal balance and framework whereby issues of health care, patient access and rights of conscience can be best…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the appropriate legal balance and framework whereby issues of health care, patient access and rights of conscience can be best accommodated.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of existing case law, statutes and conscience clauses as applied to the philosophical debate surrounding conscience in health care.

Findings

Freedom of conscience is strongly anchored in British law and policy. Practice within the health care industry, however, has been slow and resistant to rights of conscience. Respecting the right of health care workers to exercise that right, benefits the health care industry at large, and patients themselves.

Originality/value

This debate, particularly since the so-called “Scottish mid-wives case” and the recent General Pharmaceutical Council consultation on religion and personal values, has come to the forefront of bio-ethical discourse in recent months. As such, this treatment provides a valuable legal tool to answering the various positions involved in the debate.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Duncan Wilson

Debates regarding patient claims to extant tissue samples are often cited as beginning with the infamous US case of John Moore vs. the Regents of the University of…

Abstract

Debates regarding patient claims to extant tissue samples are often cited as beginning with the infamous US case of John Moore vs. the Regents of the University of California (1984–1990) – where the plaintiff unsuccessfully tried to claim title in a cell line derived from his excised spleen. Following the 1990 Supreme Court verdict, the issue of patient property in excised tissue was held by certain bioethicists as the ethical problem inhering in biomedical research from the 1980s onward: encompassing debates about a newly-avaricious biotechnology, consent, autonomy and identity. I show here that the concept of patient property was first mooted during the 1970s, some 10 years before Moore, as a response to US-based criticism of the use of foetal and human tissues in research. Rather than representing a struggle between an avaricious science and misled patients, it evolved as a result of debates between philosophers, lawyers, scientists and members of the public, amidst broader debates regarding human experimentation and abortion. Moreover, the first person to assert a patient's right to their own, or their family's tissue, in a legal arena was a scientist. This article attempts to investigate, through the evolution of ownership debates, how bioethicists and scientists themselves construct what counts as ‘public opinion’.

Details

Bioethical Issues, Sociological Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1438-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Made Indra Wijaya, Abd Rahim Mohamad and Muhammad Hafizurrachman

The purpose of this paper is to improve the Siloam Hospitals’ (SHs) patient satisfaction index (PSI) and overcome Indonesia’s geographical barriers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the Siloam Hospitals’ (SHs) patient satisfaction index (PSI) and overcome Indonesia’s geographical barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

The topic was selected for reasons guided by the Institute of Healthcare Improvement virtual breakthrough series collaborative (VBSC). Subject matter experts came from existing global quality development in collaboration with sales and marketing, and talent management agencies/departments. Patient satisfaction (PS) was measured using the SH Customer Feedback Form. Data were analysed using Friedman’s test.

Findings

The in-patient (IP) department PSI repeated measures comparison during VBSC, performed using Friedman’s test, showed a statistically significant increase in the PSI, χ2 = 44.00, p<0.001. Post hoc analysis with Wilcoxon signed-rank test was conducted with a Bonferroni correction applied, which resulted in a significant increase between the baseline and action phases (Z=3.317, p=0.003) between the baseline and continuous improvement phases (Z=6.633, p<0.001), and between the action and continuous improvement phases (Z=3.317, p=0.003), suggesting that IP PSI was continuously increasing during all VBSC phases. Like IP PSI, the out-patient department PSI was also continuously increasing during all VBSC phases.

Research limitations/implications

The VBSC was not implemented using a control group. Factors other than the VBSC may have contributed to increased PS.

Practical implications

The VBSC was conducted using virtual telecommunication. Although conventional breakthrough series might result in better cohesiveness and commitment, Indonesian geographical barriers forced an alternative strategy, which is much more cost-effective.

Originality/value

The VBSC, designed to improve PS, has never been implemented in any Indonesian private hospital group. Other hospital groups might also appreciate knowing about the VBSC to improve their PSI.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Toshinori Kitamura and Fusako Kitamura

Health professionals are in an ethical dilemma. The patients should be assumed as competent. Involuntary treatment is a violation of human rights. Therefore incompetent…

Abstract

Health professionals are in an ethical dilemma. The patients should be assumed as competent. Involuntary treatment is a violation of human rights. Therefore incompetent patients should be protected. However, one cannot determine a patient's incompetency without testing him/her, which is a violation of the assumption of competency. Thus, we propose two different types of uses for competency tests. One is to measure the appropriateness of information disclosed,but with a poor test result the information should be repeated. Another is to measure the competency of the patients when making major decisions. A poor test result will be followed by the designation of a proxy so that incompetent patients can be protected.

Details

Taking Life and Death Seriously - Bioethics from Japan
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-206-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Hojjat Sheikhbardsiri, Zahra Esamaeili Abdar, Hakimeh Sheikhasadi, Shahla Ayoubi Mahani and Arezoo Sarani

Patient right is the most important ethical right in the hospital, which equally, belongs to every human kind. Observance of patient right is responsibility of all…

Abstract

Purpose

Patient right is the most important ethical right in the hospital, which equally, belongs to every human kind. Observance of patient right is responsibility of all treatment staff when they offer treatment and care for patient. This study aims to investigate observance of patients’ rights in emergency department of educational hospitals in south-east Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a cross-sectional design and was conducted in four educational hospitals affiliated with the Kerman University of Medical Sciences in 2018. Using a two-section standard questionnaire of Patients’ Rights Charter, this study assessed patients’ rights observance using a census method, N = 382. The data from the questionnaire were analyzed using descriptive statistics including mean and standard deviations and analytic statistics such as Kolmogorov – Smirnov, ANOVA, t-test and Pearson test using SPSS 21.

Findings

Means of total score for observing all essentials of patients’ rights in emergency department of educational hospitals were at a moderate level (43.10 ±15.05) from the viewpoint of patients. The area of “providing health services based on respecting patient’s privacy and observing the essentials of secrecy and confidentiality” enjoying the highest mean score (86.89 ± 24.39), was at a good level compared to other areas. The area of “having access to effective complaint management system” showed the lowest mean score (23/85 ± 23/07) from the participants’ perspective proving a poor level. Between the patient rights observance and gender, education level, resident status and duration of hospitalization, a significant relationship was observed.

Originality/value

As regarded in this study, the degree of patients’ rights observance was moderate so, culture, paying attention to the rights of all stakeholders, identifying barriers and various factors, including the professional and environmental differences in the assessment of the need, should be considered by policymakers to design promotional and regulatory programs for improving the rights of the patient.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

David Hewitt

The purpose of this paper is to explain a decision of the Court of Appeal about the duty an Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) will sometimes have to consult a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain a decision of the Court of Appeal about the duty an Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) will sometimes have to consult a patient's nearest relative, and to set that decision in the context of an earlier one.

Design/methodology/approach

Each decision is examined in detail and one is compared with the other. Reference is made to the Mental Health Act 1983 Code of Practice.

Findings

It will be harder for an AMHP to establish that consultation is not reasonably practicable, and it will be correspondingly easier, in some cases, for a nearest relative to obtain information about a patient or achieve proximity to her.

Originality/value

This is thought to be the first time the two cases have been considered together or in their true context.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Robert F. Rizzo

Ethical, legal and medical progress has been made in end‐of‐life care, addressing crucial issues in the application of principles to clinical cases. However, despite the…

Abstract

Purpose

Ethical, legal and medical progress has been made in end‐of‐life care, addressing crucial issues in the application of principles to clinical cases. However, despite the progress, there are still unresolved issues concerning the scope and effectiveness of personal decision making and the proper use of last resort measures in terminal care. An analysis of the progress discloses both the advances and the problems still confronting patients and their families. From this perspective, one gains a better understanding of the reality of terminal care and areas that call for reform.

Design/methodology/approach

A historical analysis reveals the interrelation between moral and legal reasoning and their differences. It also discloses developments in the moral and legal realms that recognize rights of the patient with regard to treatment decisions. A critique of ethical and legal reasoning and medical practice pin‐points the salient problems.

Findings

There are still problems in the application of legal and ethical principles to specific cases. These problems are complicated by poor physician‐patient communication, the ineffective use of advance directives and the impact of the market economy on comprehensive palliative care. These call for reform to protect personal rights and dignity at the end of life.

Originality/value

A historical approach, too often lacking, promotes insight into the complexities of end‐of‐life care. An analysis flowing from such a perspective pin‐points not only the advances in ethical, legal and medical practice but also the flaws and inconsistencies that call for a more realistic approach in reasoning and practice.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 32 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Christine Farrell

Reports on research carried out in 1997/98 which used four different methods in a staged process: literature review, in‐depth interviews, a postal questionnaire and focus…

Abstract

Reports on research carried out in 1997/98 which used four different methods in a staged process: literature review, in‐depth interviews, a postal questionnaire and focus groups in acute and primary care. There was a surprising level of agreement between patients, carers and NHS staff about what was wrong with the existing charter and about what a new charter should contain. Patients knew very little about the contents of the Charter. NHS staff were much more knowledgeable and much more critical of its impact on them and NHS services. The overall view was that it had been of limited usefulness. Although there were differences in emphasis, there was almost unanimous agreement about what a new charter should contain: it should be based on the principles of openness, accountability and equity; there should be a much stronger focus on primary and community health care; there should be clearer statements about patients’ rights of access to services; standards which focus on clinical need, effectiveness and health outcomes; and standards for better communication and information in a usable form. A new charter should emphasis the rights and responsibilities of patients and staff. Most important of all, patients and staff should be involved in the development of a new charter so that it will reflect their views.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000