Search results

1 – 4 of 4
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 December 2019

Patience Emefa Dzandza

With the emergence of ranking of universities by organizations, one major factor considered in the rankings is the intellectual output of the universities. For…

Abstract

Purpose

With the emergence of ranking of universities by organizations, one major factor considered in the rankings is the intellectual output of the universities. For universities to remain part of the global academic competitive society, intellectual output of universities can no longer be stored on shelves in libraries. Academic libraries have engaged in digitization of the intellectual works of their institutions which is a core mandate of any academic library. The purpose of this study is to ascertain the state of digitization initiatives among university libraries in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted. Nine top universities in Ghana were selected to participate in this study. Interviews were conducted with heads of libraries.

Findings

The findings of the study revealed that seven out of the nine libraries studied have embarked on some sort of digitization initiative, and all libraries studied are using the same digital asset management system (Dspace). Major challenges reported by the participants that are common to all the libraries studied are lack of adequate and modern equipment, lack of trained personnel and lack of cooperation from faculty members.

Originality/value

This study brought fore the initiatives undertaken by academic libraries in Ghana to establish and maintain institutional repositories (IRs) amidst a number of challenges. It is a major contribution to the literature from West Africa as not much literature on IR is found from this part of the world.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Patience Emefa Dzandza and Harry Akussah

There has been a significant change in the provision of library services due to the application of technology to every aspect of library services. This has posed a major…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been a significant change in the provision of library services due to the application of technology to every aspect of library services. This has posed a major challenge to library staff as they need to be abreast with current technologies and their application to library services. One means by which a librarian can overcome this challenge is through professional development (PD) programs. The purpose of this paper is to determine PD opportunities in private university libraries in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey of 61 staff and interviews with 20 heads of libraries was conducted to collect data from 25 private universities in Ghana.

Findings

The study revealed that not all library staff in the private universities were allowed to attend PD programs. None of the private universities studied had a policy on PD and only three institutions made budgetary allocation to PD programs. Majority of the private universities did not have in-house PD programs and there were no means of knowledge sharing in most of the libraries studied.

Originality/value

In this paper, the researchers identified the major challenges encountered by library staff in private universities in Ghana and propose that librarians should see PD as a part of their own responsibility while, libraries should have a PD policy and make budgetary allocation toward PD.

Details

Library Management, vol. 39 no. 6-7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Patience Emefa Dzandza

This paper aims to describe an information and communication technology (ICT) training programme in the central library in Ghana, to discuss the benefits of the programme…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe an information and communication technology (ICT) training programme in the central library in Ghana, to discuss the benefits of the programme and the challenges faced by those delivering it and to relate this work to the broader development goals of the UN and the Africa Union (AU), offering some recommendations on how the programme can be made more effective.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative approach to help determine the modality of the programme to two junior high schools (JHSs) in the area that benefit weekly from the training programmes offered at the ICT corner. Interviews were conducted with two staff of the ICT corner to help gather information on the services that the ICT corner offers and the challenges with the programme; ICT teachers and a library coordinator of the two JHSs were also interviewed to find out about their opinion on the programme and the impact they think the programme can make to help achieve the agenda of equipping the youth with ICT skills. Focus group discussions were held with two classes from the JHSs for them to indicate the ICT skills they have acquired from the training and what they can use the skills to achieve. The researcher also witnessed two training sessions and observed daily activities of the ICT corner and the method of instruction.

Findings

The study brought to fore the contribution GhLA is making to help Ghana achieve Agenda 2063 and 2030 by helping students acquire basic ICT skills that are motivating them to use computers in their daily activities.

Originality/value

The study highlighted the importance of libraries in the twenty-first century and recommendations were made, among others, that, the facility should be replicated in all public libraries to be used by schools that do not have their own ICT lab in Ghana and the library should employ more staff to help with the training.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

DONUS WORLANYO BUADI and PATIENCE EMEFA DZANDZA

– This paper aims to investigate the information-seeking behaviour of traditional leaders in the Shai Osudoku District of Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the information-seeking behaviour of traditional leaders in the Shai Osudoku District of Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study methodology was used. An interview schedule was designed to elicit information from 12 chiefs from the Shai Traditional Council.

Findings

The findings of the study showed that traditional leaders sought information on issues that bordered on their community as well as information for their personal use. It also showed that they usually used informal sources such as the traditional council and their subjects but also exhibited similar information-seeking behaviour to that of professionals. They also used information dissemination or transfer methods that were in line with the oral culture of their traditional society. They had challenges in the use of information technology due to their low educational level, as well as challenges in having access to formal sources due to unavailability.

Practical implications

The study brought to light the challenges traditional leaders encountered in executing their roles. It was therefore recommended that government agencies collaborate with them to enhance their work.

Originality/value

Several studies have been conducted on information-seeking behaviour of different categories of people within different contexts. However, few studies have been conducted on the information-seeking behaviour of traditional leaders. This study thus sought to serve as a foundation research on the information-seeking behaviour of traditional leaders, with Shai Osudoku District of Ghana as the study area.

Details

Library Review, vol. 64 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

1 – 4 of 4