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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2018

Luca Cacchiarelli and Alessandro Sorrentino

During the last years, the Italian pasta chain has been strongly affected by some events such as CAP reforms in the durum wheat sector that have progressively reduced…

Abstract

Purpose

During the last years, the Italian pasta chain has been strongly affected by some events such as CAP reforms in the durum wheat sector that have progressively reduced government intervention in the market and a case of anti-competitive practices against pasta makers was identified and sanctioned by the Italian Antitrust Authority. The purpose of this paper is to detect the presence of market power in the different phases of the Italian pasta supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied the “first-pass” test proposed by Lloyd et al. (2009) on a set of monthly price indexes series from 2000 to 2013 in order to estimate if market power exists along Italian pasta chain.

Findings

Estimated results suggest that market power exists in the Italian pasta supply chain. Precisely, the presence of market power is detected for semolina producers in 2000–2004, for pasta makers in 2005–2008 as already identified by Italian antitrust and, finally, for retailers in 2008–2013.

Research limitations/implications

The method is a “first pass” test that only allows researchers to identify the presence of market power, but it is unable to estimate the intensity of this power.

Originality/value

The paper gives a contribute on estimation of market power in a food supply chain affected by CAP reform and antitrust intervention.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Claudia Dumitrescu, William Nganje and Clifford J. Shultz

This study aims to provide international pasta marketers with a better understanding of how consumers perceive product value, which enables them to create and deliver…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide international pasta marketers with a better understanding of how consumers perceive product value, which enables them to create and deliver value. The effects of COO, price, and content on purchase intentions are assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via the survey method in Romania and Greece. Using a random utility discrete choice model, the authors test five hypotheses.

Findings

Overall, Romanian and Greek individuals are less likely to buy US pasta; nevertheless, the likelihood that US or Italian pasta is purchased increases when this product is made from durum wheat versus soft wheat. Differences in purchase intentions due to age, gender, education, income, and nationality are also found.

Research limitations/implications

The results have important implications for international pasta marketers, as it helps them to better understand the perceived pasta value and to position this product effectively in Greek and Romanian markets. Future studies should examine wider pasta market segmentation in the Balkans.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the value literature by providing a framework of perceived value of foreign food products. Also, addressing concerns expressed in the literature, this study examines the COO effects on purchase intentions in a multi-cue context, focusing on low-involvement food products such as pasta. Because individual preferences for COO vary widely, the need for empirical evidence to complement theory is critical, and this is the first study with regard to Greek and Romanian consumers' intentions to buy foreign pasta.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Temitope Omolayo Fasuan, Cynthia Chioma Anyiam, Linda Obianuju Ojokoh, Judith Uchenna Chima, Titilope Modupe Olagunju, Kingsley Osita Okpara and Kenneth Chigozie Asadu

Pasta is popularly consumed in developed and developing countries. Many low-income homes that could not afford protein-rich foods consumed pasta without further…

Abstract

Purpose

Pasta is popularly consumed in developed and developing countries. Many low-income homes that could not afford protein-rich foods consumed pasta without further supplements as a meal. However, pasta is deficient in protein and some other health-promoting substances. Deoiled sesame and amaranth flours are rich in protein, minerals, amino acids, antioxidants and many non-nutrient-based health benefits. Formulating a nutrient-dense pasta product (spaghetti) would reduce protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and improve the health status of pasta consumers. This study aims to investigate some bioactive, nutrients and non-nutrient components of developed and optimized spaghetti pasta from deoiled sesame, amaranth and modified sorghum starch blend.

Design/methodology/approach

Amaranth, sorghum and sesame grains were sorted, wet-cleaned and dried. Sesame grain was roasted while starch was extracted from sorghum grain. The innate starch was modified by heat-moisture treatment. The prepared grains and starch were milled into flours and formulated into different flour mixtures using the Box-Behnken design of response surface methodology and the process was modeled and optimized. The flour mixtures were made into spaghetti pasta. Proximate, mineral, amino acids, biological value, protein efficiency ration, phytochemical, antioxidant activity, physico-functional and sensory properties of the formulated spaghetti were evaluated using standard procedures.

Findings

An optimal mixture of deoiled sesame (31.12g/100g), amaranth (56.56g/100g) and modified sorghum starch (12.32g/100g) were established, which yielded protein (25.79g/100g), appearance (96.65%), taste (94.57%) and acceptability index (97.37%). The spaghetti was significantly (p-values ranged from 0.001 to 0.018) superior in protein, ash, fat, fiber, calcium, magnesium, zinc, alkaloids, total phenolic, flavonoids, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazl (DPPH) and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) relative to the control (100% wheat flour). Amino acid showed that the product is rich in histidine, isoleucine, phenylalanine and threonine. The high essential amino acid index of the product indicated that it is a good protein source. The spaghetti was significantly (p-values ranged from 0.001 to 0.021) superior in aroma, taste and acceptability index relative to the control.

Originality/value

This study showed the feasibility of developing spaghetti pasta from deoiled sesame, amaranth grains and modified sorghum starch. The production process described in this study is scalable; and the process could be applied on a small scale for the development of self-entrepreneurs and industrially. The high protein content of the product indicated that it could be used to reduce PEM in developing countries.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Nazife Karamullaoglu and Ozlem Sandikci

This paper aims to understand how social, cultural and political economic dynamics inform packaging design. Specifically, it focuses on one of the oldest Turkish pasta

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand how social, cultural and political economic dynamics inform packaging design. Specifically, it focuses on one of the oldest Turkish pasta brands, Piyale, and seeks to understand the impact of the changes in the macro-institutional structures on its packaging practices over the course of almost a century.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is mainly based on data collected through archival and documentary research. The archival data are gathered from various sources including the personal archives of the former managers, advertisements published in the popular magazines of the time and industry reports and documents. Data are analyzed using a combination of compositional and social semiotic analysis.

Findings

The analysis indicates four distinct periods in the brand’s history. The design elements and visual identity reflect the social, cultural, political, economic and technological changes shaping the Turkish society in these different time periods. The findings show that a socio-historically situated analysis of a brand’s packaging design transformation reveals the complex relationship between design and culture and provides clues to the market-society interface.

Originality/value

This study provides a comprehensive historical analysis of the visual identity evolution of the oldest Turkish pasta brand Piyale and contributes to research on packaging histories in the non-Western markets.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2021

Andrea Sabatini, Thomas O’Toole and Gian Luca Gregori

The purpose of this paper is to explore how sustainability is integrated into a new venture’s business network initiation. This study unpacks sustainability in business…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how sustainability is integrated into a new venture’s business network initiation. This study unpacks sustainability in business network initiation using temporal bracketing and identifying its main processes. Temporal bracketing supports the understanding of the evolution of sustainability in network initiation. The processes help explore the sustainability patterns that emerge from the new venture’s attempt to integrate sustainability into network initiation.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploratory case study of an Italian pasta maker draws on industrial network theory to focus on the business network initiation of new ventures. The novelty is the integration of sustainability into the business network initiation literature. This paper adopts a single case study methodology and an abductive approach to analysis.

Findings

This study finds that sustainability in network initiation is achieved through three periods of initiation and through five processes that are overlapping, intertwined and reciprocal. This study suggests that sustainability can have a positive or negative impact when integrated into the initiation process.

Originality/value

This paper provides a conceptual framework for understanding how a new venture integrates sustainability in its network initiation. The framework comprises periods and processes of network initiation which show how a new venture can integrate sustainability in its business activities and resources through interaction with network actors.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Ronald Scott Wolf and Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez

Reputational crisis negatively affects brands and companies. This chapter, based on a single case study, aims to explore how prejudicial corporate statements directed…

Abstract

Purpose

Reputational crisis negatively affects brands and companies. This chapter, based on a single case study, aims to explore how prejudicial corporate statements directed toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals have affected the Italian multinational Barilla S.p.A., as well as how the company responded both internally and to the market in order to attempt to overcome the highly damaging consequences.

Design/Methodology

This chapter uses a single case-study methodology, which constitutes “a research strategy that focuses on understanding the dynamics present within single settings to create theoretical constructs, propositions and/or midrange theory from empirical evidence” (Eisenhardt, 1989, p. 534). The case-study design was chosen as it has been demonstrated to provide a methodological tool for both theory generation and theory testing (Gibbert et al., 2008).

Findings

Conclusions from the chapter indicate that negative, incendiary, and oftentimes comments citing either religious or stereotypical-based ideology negatively impact both the consumers and its associated publics in terms of product branding or reputation image.

Research Limitations

The study’s limitations, which rely primarily on a single case study and secondary research data, may motivate further investigative avenues, particularly as similarly referenced events continue to unfold almost daily, such as the study’s referenced incident with Philippine boxer Manny Pacquiao, as well as action taken by social media giants (Apple and Facebook) against the controversial media figure Alex Jones.

Practical and Social Implications

This chapter also looks at family succession roadblocks and navigating social media gaffes. These contemporary issues highlight challenges, strategies, sales and market share dynamics for the company, and suggestions for navigating the road ahead. The research concludes with possible linkages and insights for both ongoing management issues and potential areas for future research. Other findings indicate that rapid responses, particularly those citing concrete corporate policy changes or tangible actions, help to reverse and mitigate reputational damage, and contemporary approaches utilizing social media appear to buttress these efforts.

Originality/Value

This case study of Barilla as well as other firms mentioned, such as Chick-fil-A and Nike (which have experienced parallel situational crises), indicates that in only the last five years of contemporary international business practice, MNEs are continually and at times unexpectedly challenged by the lack of sensitivity demonstrated by their owners and spokespeople who utter comments which may be seen by the public as potentially harmful to the LGBT community. This study hopes to illuminate this challenge while offering tangible solutions to turning around future, similar situational crises.

Details

Diversity within Diversity Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-172-9

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Nazife Karamullaoglu and Ozlem Sandikci

This purpose of this paper is to explore how Western design, fashion and aesthetic styles influenced advertising practice in Turkey in the post-Second World War era…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to explore how Western design, fashion and aesthetic styles influenced advertising practice in Turkey in the post-Second World War era. Specifically, the authors focus on the key targets of the consumerist ideology of the period, women and discuss the representations of females in Turkish advertisements.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were analysed using a combination of social semiotic and compositional analysis methods. Compositional analysis focused on the formal qualities and design elements of the ads; social semiotic analysis sought to uncover their meaning potentials in relation to social, cultural, political and economic dynamics of the period. The advertisements of a prominent Turkish pasta brand, Piyale, published in the local adaptation of the American Life magazine, between 1956 and 1966, constitute the data set.

Findings

The analysis reveals that Piyale followed the stylistic and thematic trends prevailing in American and European advertisements at the time and crafted ads that constructed and communicated a Westernized image of Turkish women and families. In line with the cultural currents of the 1950s and 1960s, the ads emphasize patriarchal gender roles and traditional family values and address the woman as a consumer whose priority is to please her husband and take good care of her children.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the advertising history in non-Western contexts and provides an understanding of the influence Western advertising conventions and fashion trends had on developing country markets. The findings indicate that Western-inspired representations and gender roles dominated advertisements of local brands during the post-war period.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Stefano Orsini, Susanne Padel, Danilo Gambelli, Julia Lernoud, Jürn Sanders, Francesco Solfanelli, Matthias Stolze, Helga Willer and Raffaele Zanoli

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the supply chains for organic milk, apples and pasta in eight European countries and how added value is distributed among…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the supply chains for organic milk, apples and pasta in eight European countries and how added value is distributed among market players.

Design/methodology/approach

Using secondary data and expert interviews, a market overview for the three products is provided as the basis of a more detailed analysis of the added value in 12 organic supply chain examples. For this, interviews with market players and an “added value calculator” tool are employed.

Findings

The farm gate and retail price of organic products is higher than conventional. Supermarkets are the main outlet for organic milk and apples in the countries studied, whereas the situation for organic pasta is varied, suggesting that the use of different sale channels is influenced by the food product. The farmers’ share of added value ranges between 3 and 65 per cent of the added value created in the organic supply chains analysed. Organic offers opportunities to increase the farmers’ share of added value both in supermarkets and alternative sale channels, by developing collaboration, physical infrastructures for organic and integrating operations upstream of the chain.

Research limitations/implications

While more research is needed into a larger number of chains, this paper indicates that there are dynamics and features at supply chain level, such as the distribution of added value and the target markets used, that cannot be interpreted according to the binary division between “mainstream” and “alternative” organic suggested by the conventionalisation hypothesis.

Originality/value

The distribution of added value for existing supply chains in eight European countries is calculated by using an effective added value calculator tool.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2018

Valentina Della Corte, Giovanna Del Gaudio and Fabiana Sepe

Over the past few years, several scholars have focused on innovation strategies with specific regard to family food firms. In line with this research stream, the purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past few years, several scholars have focused on innovation strategies with specific regard to family food firms. In line with this research stream, the purpose of this paper is to understand how family food firms with long-standing traditions can implement innovative productions while remaining anchored to the past.

Design/methodology/approach

By adopting a qualitative research methodology, mainly based on a multiple case study, this paper seeks to cover some unexplored areas regarding the opportunity of combining tradition and innovation to achieve success in the highly competitive international arena in which family food firms operate. The authors analyze the cases of “La Torrente,” “Cioccolatitaliani” and “La Fabbrica della Pasta di Gragnano.”

Findings

Successful family food firms leverage their deep-rooted knowledge of both family and local traditions to innovate. At same time, they establish continuous info exchange flows with all of the firm’s stakeholders by adopting an open innovation approach.

Research limitations/implications

From a theoretical perspective, there is a need for an in-depth study of how an effective blend of tradition and innovation is formalized, above all, in family firms. As for the practical implications, all the three case studies represent a best practice, especially for family firms with a long-standing history and strong local connections.

Practical implications

The paper shows how important it is to keep traditional factors in food industry and offers hints and suggestions to decision makers of family firms on how to valorize, in terms of competitiveness, their traditional resources – almost bound to their territory with innovation tools and processes.

Social implications

The paper is interesting because it offers an analysis of a specific group of firms – family firms – that characterize many industries in Italy and in Europe. Although often small, these firms can show dynamism and creativity. The paper offers hints on how to approach innovation in the sector while keeping the value of tradition.

Originality/value

The originality of the proposed conceptual model stems from the need to overcome the previous theoretical models, which deal separately with sources of past knowledge and sources of new and/or external knowledge.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Stefano Predieri, Gianluca Sotis, Paola Rodinò, Edoardo Gatti, Massimiliano Magli, Federica Rossi, Giulia Maria Daniele, Marta Cianciabella and Roberto Volpe

The third age can be a period of major food consumption changes. Either voluntary or imposed by health issues, they may be accompanied by alterations in sensory acuity…

Abstract

Purpose

The third age can be a period of major food consumption changes. Either voluntary or imposed by health issues, they may be accompanied by alterations in sensory acuity. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how lifelong food habits and health-age issues affect food choice at a later age, with the aim of developing strategies to direct aged people toward healthier food habits.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey, aimed to investigate differences between current and past food habits, was carried out in a group of 170 Italian older adults. Questions focused on the composition of the main meal, asking participants to describe its actual structure and to highlight differences in previous years’ food habits. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was planned, during which participants were asked to help formulating innovative pasta sauces with healthy ingredients.

Findings

This survey clearly illustrated gender-related differences: women were characterized by a higher consumption of vegetables, while men revealed a more frequent use of wine, pasta and meat. The DCE technique suited older adults’ abilities and enabled the development of innovative sauces, indicating a clear preference for extra virgin olive oil, as compared to cream or butter. Gender-related differences were confirmed: women mainly chose a vegetarian sauce, while men expressed an inclination for red meat.

Originality/value

This is the first report of a successful application of the DCE technique to investigate older adults’ dietary choices. The outspoken preference for olive oil as fat in sauce composition is a positive finding for future actions aimed at directing older adults toward healthier food habits.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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