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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Richard L. Osborne

The succession of second‐generation entrepreneurs to control of thefamily business created by their fathers is a challenging, oftenunsatisfactory process. A study of ten…

Abstract

The succession of second‐generation entrepreneurs to control of the family business created by their fathers is a challenging, often unsatisfactory process. A study of ten entrepreneurial families who have experienced succession discovered that the preparation of sons and daughters to take over the family business was disorganised, inadequate, and sometimes inept. Moreover, founder‐fathers and non‐family employees had done little to prepare for the transition to second‐generation leadership. Based on the troubling experience of these ten families and the author′s work with dozens of family businesses, this article proposes a comprehensive developmental model designed to increase the chances of second‐generation success.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Guat Tin Low, Keng Choy Chong and Allan Walker

Examines the benefits of the mentoring component in the one‐year Diplomaof Educational Administration programme offered by the NationalInstitute of Education, to the

Abstract

Examines the benefits of the mentoring component in the one‐year Diploma of Educational Administration programme offered by the National Institute of Education, to the education system in Singapore. Thirty‐six mentors involved in the programme since its inception in 1984 were invited to give their views on the benefits of the mentor/ protege programme. Thematic analysis of their responses showed that the most common theme which emerged was that of reciprocal learning. Mentors learn through helping others to learn. Through the mentoring programme, the educational system benefits as there is a pool of potential principals ready to take the helm of leadership in the schools. The programme also helps to ensure there is a possibility of systemic renewal and that of systemic repeat, i.e. practices which are passed on to the next generation of leaders.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Abstract

Subject area

Family business

Study level/applicability

This case study is relevant for undergraduate and post-graduate degrees, specifically in the field of entrepreneurship. This case can be applied in the family business and entrepreneurship module.

Case overview

This case highlights the issue of succession planning in a family business. It describes the problem faced by the founder of a security service company, Kurniawan Security Services Sdn Bhd., in handing over his business to his sons. The case depicts the occurrence of conflicts as one of the common problems in running a family business which, in the end, may affect the perpetuity of the business concerns.

Expected learning outcomes

Upon completion of the case analysis, students should be able to explain the concept of entrepreneurship in the context of a family business, discuss the issue of succession planning commonly associated with running a family business, analyse critically the nature of conflicts that may occur in a family business and suggest how the problem(s) can be attempted to be solved from within the business management perspectives.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Júlia Tobak, Adrián Nagy, Károly Pető, Veronika Fenyves and András Nábrádi

The purpose of this paper is to present the experience, successful management and the succession of generations in a Hungarian corporation in the food industry through the

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the experience, successful management and the succession of generations in a Hungarian corporation in the food industry through the “Best Practice” model.

Design/methodology/approach

The chosen methodology for this paper is “The best practice model” prepared by The Solutionist Group. The model presents the characteristics of family businesses and illustrates how the process of sustainable enterprise differs in different fields concerning family and non-family businesses. In applying this model, the experience, successful management and the succession of generations will be presented in the case of a large Hungarian enterprise which has a determining role in the Hungarian food industry. The results are based on the question framework of the expert interviews.

Findings

The history of family-owned firms shows that in order to maintain appropriate business succession activity the family management has to plan in advance. Passing the baton to the next generation successfully is a complex and long-term family management role and it has strategic importance. To ensure business continuity, the successor has to take over the business and operate it well. That is why the sharing of knowledge, the innovation performance and the best practice are important parts of family company’s culture, and they consequently play an important part in the pass the baton project within family-owned firms.

Originality/value

This paper expands the knowledge about the succession of family businesses.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Pauline Drury

The purpose of this paper is to consider the factors affecting the success of succession planning in family businesses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the factors affecting the success of succession planning in family businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reports on a panel discussion in which the former chairman of the William Jackson Food Group describes the processes put in place to manage succession at this family firm and his own experience of handing over to his successor.

Findings

Once upon a time, saying that you were going into the family business marked the end of any career discussion. Now it’s just the beginning – interest in family firms has never been greater. Succession planning is a subject guaranteed to generate questions – everyone wants to know how to get it right. Fortunately, it’s an area where some are happy to share their experience.

Research limitations/implications

The paper highlights the need for more longitudinal research on family firms.

Practical implications

This paper provides a practical guide to structures and processes that can facilitate succession planning in family firms.

Social implications

It draws attention to the emotional and psychological impact of succession on the retiring individual and the need to create life structures to replace former business involvement.

Originality/value

This paper aims to present a frank discussion of the approach to succession planning taken by one family business and the broader research questions that it raises.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Case study
Publication date: 28 July 2016

John L. Ward

The ATF case is a succinct opportunity to explore the many special features of leadership succession for a family business. In 2009 the company was passing the baton to the

Abstract

The ATF case is a succinct opportunity to explore the many special features of leadership succession for a family business. In 2009 the company was passing the baton to the oldest of three sons in the second-generation family business.

ATF produced metal and plastic fasteners for, primarily, the automotive industry. ATF had grown into a company with more than $50 million in annual revenues. The company had grown in large part through alliances with other family businesses around the world. First-generation patriarch Don Surber had led the company since he acquired it in 1982. Don was known for his charismatic leadership style and his focus on driving value through a network approach.

The case traces the career paths of all three sons and looks at the succession through the eyes of the oldest son, Jason Surber. The elements, constituents, and challenges of succession are evident. The fundamental insight is that business leadership succession is far more than just passing the business leadership baton. It also requires attention to the family, the board, the whole system of external stakeholders, and the future of ownership.

The epilogue in this note covers the period from 2009 to 2012 by describing what Jason did to earn credibility, to incorporate his brothers, and to define his personal leadership philosophy and style. The epilogue thus provides students with an opportunity to consider and define their own personal philosophy of management leadership and their own style. They will see the art of melding styles from the past with their own for the future.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2015

Diola Bagayoko, Ella L. Kelley and LaShounda Franklin

The purpose of this chapter is to describe the climate and practice of undergraduate research in selected Science and Engineering departments at Southern University and…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to describe the climate and practice of undergraduate research in selected Science and Engineering departments at Southern University and A&M College in Baton Rouge (SUBR), Louisiana, from 1994 to 2014. We briefly recall the long tradition of undergraduate research participation and the accompanying mentoring at SUBR. The establishment of the Timbuktu Academy in 1990–1991, with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), followed two years of review of the literature in teaching, mentoring, and learning. The paradigm and Ten Strand Systemic Mentoring model of the Academy, with a major funding by the Department of the Navy, Office of Naval Research (ONR), have sustained a research-based and practice-verified creation of a highly supportive and challenging research eco-system for selected science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) undergraduate scholars, one that integrates seamlessly education and research.

Details

Infusing Undergraduate Research into Historically Black Colleges and Universities Curricula
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-159-0

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2019

Jocelene Buckman, Paul Jones and Samuel Buame

This paper aims to create a connection between entrepreneurial learning and succession planning in family-owned businesses (FOB), and how they work together to improve a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to create a connection between entrepreneurial learning and succession planning in family-owned businesses (FOB), and how they work together to improve a firm’s chances of survival beyond the founder within a Ghanaian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a phenomenological study, this work investigates succession planning processes in FOB, with the objective of developing a succession model suitable for the Ghanaian context. Using a constructivist perspective, six family businesses were studied, interviewing the founder, successor, family members, employees and customers therein.

Findings

Existing knowledge has been confirmed that succession is not a one-off event, but a process that takes place over time, requiring the buy-in of not just the founder and successor, but also other stakeholders, including the successor’s siblings and spouse (if any), whose support is imperative to the success of the process. This study reviewed and synthesised relevant research data into a conceptual framework.

Research limitations/implications

This study can potentially inform the basis of a longitudinal study, using the developed framework to confirm its robustness. It can also inform further quantitative research to validate the generalisability of the framework.

Practical implications

The study contributes to FOB practice, the holistic succession model spanning the founder’s entry into the business, to the post-succession period, and incorporating contextual intervening variables such as polygamy, religion and systems of inheritance, while also contributing to theory by proposing a comprehensive succession process theory to enhance understanding of the process.

Originality/value

The study contributes increased understanding of the essential elements in the succession process in an African context, what appropriate measures can be implemented for effective succession outcomes, and how key stakeholders of the business can be effectively managed as part of overseeing the succession process for positive organisational outcomes.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Charles B. Owen, Laura Dillon, Alison Dobbins, Matthew Rhodes, Madeline Levinson and Noah Keppers

The purpose of this paper is to present the design and evolution of the Dancing Computer project. Dancing Computer is an ongoing research project at the Michigan State…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the design and evolution of the Dancing Computer project. Dancing Computer is an ongoing research project at the Michigan State University, which is developing a system that aims to increase computer literacy in elementary-aged children by teaching them first to read code before they write it. The main objective is to educate children on basic concepts of computer science.

Design/methodology/approach

Children are given tablet computers that present a simple program line-by-line that they execute as they pretend to be a computer. The programs are acted out on a portable dance floor consisting of colored tiles, and the program statements instruct the child to move, turn and act out dance poses and terminology.

Findings

The Dancing Computer prototype was tested in six different locations in 2016, reaching approximately 250 students. Learning was demonstrated by significant improvements in both task duration and error performance as students performed the activities. The most common errors were movement errors, where participants failed to move the correct number of squares.

Social implications

This project has the potential to increase the level of computer literacy for thousands of children. This project’s goal is to increase understanding of what a computer does, what a program does and the step-by-step nature of computer programs.

Originality/value

This is a unique and a different approach – the norm being to start students off writing code in some language. In Dancing Computer stages children as readers of programs, allowing them to pretend to be a computer in a fun and engaging activity while also learning how computers execute real programs.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

John James Cater

The purpose of this case study is to examine the impact of regional culture and family dynamics on firm survival and longevity. Secondary issues include operations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to examine the impact of regional culture and family dynamics on firm survival and longevity. Secondary issues include operations management in a retail grocery, hardware, and building supply store.

Design/methodology/approach

The author performed in‐depth qualitative interviews with the business owners and visited on site. The tape‐recorded interviews followed a formal list of questions, but were semi‐structured in nature.

Findings

Although the store was remotely located, wise management and intelligent leadership have contributed to business success and survival into the fourth generation of family ownership.

Research limitations/implications

As an exploratory qualitative case study, there are limitations concerning generalizability. Additionally, the findings here relate particularly to small family businesses.

Practical implications

Family firms possess a business side and a family side. In this case, success factors on the business side included merchandising skills, responsiveness to customer needs, profitable sales margins, and reinvestment in facilities. On the family side, success factors included harmonious relations among family members, the incumbent leaders’ desire for succession to occur, incumbent leaders’ financial forbearance or sacrifice, solid education of successors, mentoring of the next generation, and willing and able successors.

Originality/value

This case analyzed characteristics that lead to long term survival, examined the process of succession, and assessed the two‐sided nature – business side and family side – of a small family business.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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