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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Johannes W.F.C. van Lieshout, Jeroen M. van der Velden, Robert J. Blomme and Pascale Peters

Establishing a competitive advantage in today's dynamic environment involves optimizing an organization's exploration and exploitation strategy. This paper aims to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

Establishing a competitive advantage in today's dynamic environment involves optimizing an organization's exploration and exploitation strategy. This paper aims to explore how an open innovation strategy complements the organization's ambidextrous strategy in attaining a competitive advantage. Organizational ambidexterity and dynamic capability theories are also explored to investigate the impact of open innovation on the organization's ambidextrous strategy and competitive advantage – especially inbound and outbound open innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a systematic literature review using Boolean search techniques, which was focused on the research fields of the sub-areas of general management, strategy, innovation, organization studies, information management, entrepreneurship, international business, marketing, and economics, supplemented by the snowball technique.

Findings

Organizations that combine their ambidextrous strategy with open innovation attributes achieve a competitive advantage through developing their dynamic capabilities by which organizations change their value proposition. This study also shows that an ambidextrous strategy should no longer be viewed as a structural solution implemented by management, but also as a bottom-up intervention. Additionally, the authors found that the organization's dynamic capabilities establish a feedback loop, which changes the organization's ambidextrous strategy to resolve the efficiency–agility paradox.

Originality/value

Previous research has focused on strategic orientation; however, hardly any research has investigated how the interrelatedness of open innovation, organizational ambidexterity and dynamic capabilities support a competitive advantage. The authors present a conceptual model that inspires new research avenues.

Details

European Journal of Management Studies, vol. 26 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2183-4172

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Sascha Kraus-Hoogeveen, Pascale Peters, Els Van der Pool and Beatrice Van der Heijden

This mixed-method study aims to contribute to the scholarly debate by outlining an individual-level theoretical framework for public value creation and evaluation that…

Abstract

Purpose

This mixed-method study aims to contribute to the scholarly debate by outlining an individual-level theoretical framework for public value creation and evaluation that builds upon a social exchange perspective. It provides insights into the normative frames of primary stakeholders in the Dutch care at home sector, that is professionals, managers, clients and informal care providers.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method design comprising a customized survey among 349 stakeholders, preceded by 31 in-depth interviews was used.

Findings

This empirical work shows differences and similarities in the stakeholders' normative frames revealed via three dimensions of expectations regarding the process of care delivery: personal contact, impact of rules and procedures and communication.

Social implications

These differences in interpretation have implications for the measurement and evaluation of public value creation.

Originality/value

By statistically and methodologically exploring the different expectations' scales that are developed, we intend to work toward a measure for public value creation, which can be used in future empirical work.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Philippe Hermel and Juan Ramis‐Pujol

Peters and Waterman brought the concept of excellence into the conscious practice of organizations during the early 1980s. Theory has timidly followed afterwards. However…

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3080

Abstract

Peters and Waterman brought the concept of excellence into the conscious practice of organizations during the early 1980s. Theory has timidly followed afterwards. However, the concept existed before and it is broadly used nowadays. This article attempts to synthesize the evolution of excellence, especially in the last 20 years, during which time some legitimate counter developments have shown important limits for these “excellence stages”. Those counter developments tend to be enlightening but have often brought about confusion. Where could excellence be tomorrow and what should organizations do about it? Concludes from this analysis that: deep conceptual work is necessary; the importance of implementation is often mentioned in the literature but not addressed in detail; the idea of sustainability may need further development, especially concerning a clear separation between the socio‐ecological and the competitive advantage perspectives; the different excellence approaches have not looked deeply into the differences between large and small enterprises, public and private sectors, and the organization itself and its components.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Sheila Marsh and Marion Macalpine

This article uses stories from organisations to show how the “Helvig Square” can be an accessible and stimulating tool for managers learning to manage paradox. Many of us…

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812

Abstract

This article uses stories from organisations to show how the “Helvig Square” can be an accessible and stimulating tool for managers learning to manage paradox. Many of us have been socialised and educated into binary, “either/or” thinking. As managers we find it hard to cope with current management dilemmas, such as how to plan and stay flexible, how to devolve decisions and keep corporate focus. In this article we build on the work of Pascale who uses the concept of paradox and working with “contending opposites”. This is important thinking, but we show how people can still be entrenched in opposing camps and unable to engage in meaningful dialogue. We explore how managers can expand their thinking through using the Helvig Square. This framework provides a tool which represents the problem more fully, offers a means of analysis and enables a focus on action.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2010

Mary Jo Hatch

Stanford contributed significantly to the organizational culture movement that occurred in organization studies from 1970–2000. This chapter traces developments at…

Abstract

Stanford contributed significantly to the organizational culture movement that occurred in organization studies from 1970–2000. This chapter traces developments at Stanford and puts the contributions of its researchers and scholars in the context of the many influences that shaped the study of organizational culture during this period. In addition to the historical account, there is speculation about why the culture movement at Stanford more or less ended but might yet be revived, either by those studying institutionalization processes or by those who resist them.

Details

Stanford's Organization Theory Renaissance, 1970–2000
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-930-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1983

Ronnie Lessem

In two previous articles on “The New World of Work” (ICT, November 1982) and “The Creative Re‐integration of Business” (ICT, May 1983) I sketched out an agenda for…

Abstract

In two previous articles on “The New World of Work” (ICT, November 1982) and “The Creative Re‐integration of Business” (ICT, May 1983) I sketched out an agenda for business, tomorrow. Armed with what seemed to me home truths, I ventured across the Atlantic, to attend a conference on Organisational Transformation in New Hampshire. As I began to listen to those agents of transformation in the “land of plenty”, I became progressively more concerned. For the cupboard was bare. It was plain for me to see that the Americans had no fundamental answers. They were being stymied not by the great Russian Bear, but by their own projections on to the Japanese. So, I would have to gain confidence in my own answers.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 15 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Francis Farrelly, Pascale Quester and Peter Smolianov

Academic research in the area of sports marketing has concentrated on bi‐lateral relationships, such as that linking a sponsor with the recipient of support, or that…

Abstract

Academic research in the area of sports marketing has concentrated on bi‐lateral relationships, such as that linking a sponsor with the recipient of support, or that between the audience and a particular sport. Yet the industry, made of many relationships, involves probably more than the mere sum of all these bi‐lateral links. This paper first relates the principles of relationship marketing to the sports industry and presents a graphical representation of its multiple players and the relationships that bind them. Then, based on qualitative information obtained from the Australian Cricket Board, it illustrates how this industry map can be used by any player in the industry in order to identify and prioritise those relationship links in order to develop successful marketing strategies. It is suggested that industry mapping linked with the relationship marketing focus, can be the anchor for quality service improvements in the sports industry.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2016

Niels Hoornweg, Pascale Peters and Beatrice van der Heijden

This survey study among 111 teleworkers in a bank organization investigated the relationship between telework intensity and individual productivity, and whether this…

Abstract

This survey study among 111 teleworkers in a bank organization investigated the relationship between telework intensity and individual productivity, and whether this relationship was mediated by employees’ intrinsic motivation. Also the moderating role of office hours in the model’s associations was studied. Based on the Job Demands-Resources Model (Bakker & Demerouti, 2007) and the professional isolation literature (e.g., Golden, Vega, & Dino, 2008), we developed and tested a set of hypotheses. Partly in line with expectations, we found a direct curvilinear relationship between telework intensity and individual productivity, characterized by a slight, non-significant positive association at the low telework intensity end, and a significant negative association for the high telework intensity end. Strikingly, we neither found support for a mediating role of intrinsic motivation, nor for a moderation effect of the number of office hours in the relationship between telework intensity and intrinsic motivation. However, the direct relationship between telework intensity and individual productivity appeared to be moderated by the number of office hours. It was concluded that consequences for productivity are contingent on telework intensity, and that the number of office hours has an important impact on the consequences of different telework intensities. The study’s outcomes can inform management and HR practitioners to understand how to implement and appropriately make use of telework.

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2010

Inge Bleijenbergh, Pascale Peters and Erik Poutsma

This paper aims to introduce the theme of the special issue – diversity management beyond the business case. It addresses two main questions: first, how increased…

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9801

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce the theme of the special issue – diversity management beyond the business case. It addresses two main questions: first, how increased diversification within workgroups or labour is dealt with via diversity management, and second what the effects are of this increased diversity for group performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The different contributions are embedded into two important discussions in the literature: problems with the concept of diversity and problems with outcomes of diversity management.

Findings

Reflecting on the contributions to this special issue, it is argued that solely emphasizing business case arguments for supporting the implementation of diversity management may be rather risky. They conclude with a plea for emphasis on arguments of justice and sustainability of the employment relationship and discuss future avenues for research.

Originality/value

The paper shows the difficulty of universally applying the concept of diversity and diversity management. In addition, it shows that the claimed positive impact of diversity management is contingent on several factors.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2010

Pascale Peters, Inge Bleijenbergh and Frederik Poutsma

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the work of the Dutch government's “Taskforce Part‐time Plus” set up to stimulate longer working hours for particularly…

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761

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the work of the Dutch government's “Taskforce Part‐time Plus” set up to stimulate longer working hours for particularly Dutch women holding part‐time jobs of less than 24 h per week, to help counteract a predicted structural shortage of manpower.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2009, the Taskforce commissioned two studies. The first study comprised three surveys, respectively, among: women holding smaller part‐time jobs; full‐time working men; and employers. The second study focused on the relationship between ambition, working hours and gender. A survey of 7,000 male and female labour‐market participants was combined with qualitative data collection, encompassing focus group interviews with 35 male and female part‐time workers and their managers, and three group model building sessions.

Findings

The first study showed that only a small amount of Dutch part‐time working women is willing to work longer hours in the short term. In the second study, the hypothesis that women's lower working hours could be explained by a lack of career ambition was rejected. However, the results showed that women did neither feel challenged, nor supported by their working and household conditions to extend their working hours to realize their ambitions (in the short run).

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that, in the Dutch case and in some contexts, greater equality, diversity and inclusion not only demands support for reduced work‐loads, but rather calls for a new culture in which women's marginal labour‐market participation does not remain unquestioned.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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