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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Hanna Silvola and Eija Vinnari

The purpose of this paper is to enrich extant understanding of the role of both agency and context in the uptake of sustainability assurance. To this end, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enrich extant understanding of the role of both agency and context in the uptake of sustainability assurance. To this end, the authors examine auditors' attempts to promote sustainability assurance and establish it as a practice requiring the professional involvement of auditors.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying institutional work (Lawrence and Suddaby, 2006) and institutional logics (Thornton, 2002; Thornton et al., 2012) as the method theories, the authors examine interview data and a variety of documentary evidence collected in Finland, a small society characterized by social and environmental values, beliefs in functioning institutions and public trust in companies behaving responsibly.

Findings

With this study, the authors make two main contributions to extant literature. First, the authors illustrate the limits that society-level logics related to corporate social responsibility, together with the undermining or rejected institutional work of other agents, place especially on the political and cultural work undertaken by auditors. Second, the study responds to Power's (2003) call for country-specific studies by exploring a rather unique context, Finland, where societal trust in companies is arguably stronger than in many other countries and this trust appears to affect how actors perceive the need for sustainability assurance.

Originality/value

This is one of the few accounting studies that combines institutional logics and institutional work to study the uptake of a management fashion, in this case sustainability assurance.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Susannah Micaela Hanlon

The study aims to explore and discuss the extent of influence of informal communication on learning in a European social democracy political party through a dual lens…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore and discuss the extent of influence of informal communication on learning in a European social democracy political party through a dual lens approach combining information behaviour and organisational learning perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents results from an in depth qualitative study, whereby data were collected through semi-structured and episodic narrative interviews. Template analysis was used.

Findings

Informal conversations were identified as intrinsic to the work of the political party. They did influence learning at individual and group levels, and there was a degree of diffusion within the organisation, although the latter was found to depend on opportunity, individual self-efficacy, level of involvement in the party and perceptions of who has influence. The dual lens approach facilitated greater levels of granularity of analysis at individual and group levels of learning.

Research limitations/implications

The paper highlights the benefits of using a dual lens approach to add depth to the interpretation of the research findings. Due to the small number of participants further research is needed to verify and extend the results and support a greater degree of transferability.

Originality/value

The information behaviour and organisational research theory that underpin the research have not been used together in this way before, and the context for the phenomenon being researched, a traditional political party struggling against the rise of populism in the 21st century, is both contemporary and understudied in each of the theory areas.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Liliane Abboud, Nabila As'ad, Nicola Bilstein, Annelies Costers, Bieke Henkens and Katrien Verleye

Dyadic interactions between customers and service providers rarely occur in isolation. Still, there is a lack of systematic knowledge about the roles that different types…

Abstract

Purpose

Dyadic interactions between customers and service providers rarely occur in isolation. Still, there is a lack of systematic knowledge about the roles that different types of nontechnological third parties – that is, other customers, pets, other employees and other firms – can adopt in relation to customers and service providers during encounters. The present study aims to unravel these roles and highlight their implications for customers, service providers and/or third parties.

Design/methodology/approach

This research relies on a systematic review of literature in the Web of Science using a search string pertaining to the research study’s objectives. In total, 2,726 articles were screened by title and abstract using clear inclusion and exclusion criteria, thereby extracting 189 articles for full-text eligibility. The final sample consisted of 139 articles for coding and analysis.

Findings

The analyses reveal that other customers, pets, other employees and other firms can adopt five roles: bystander, connector, endorser, balancer and partner. Each role has different implications for customers, service providers and/or third parties. Additionally, the five roles are associated with distinct constellations of the customer, the service provider and the third party. These roles and constellations are dynamic and not mutually exclusive.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the service encounter literature by providing a thorough understanding of the various third-party roles and their implications for customers, service providers and/or third parties during encounters. As such, this research sheds light on the conditions under which third parties become “significant others” in service encounters and identifies avenues for future research.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Jennifer Lees‐Marshment

Comprehensive political marketing informs how parties determine their policies and organisation, not just how they campaign. This article applies the marketing concepts of…

Abstract

Comprehensive political marketing informs how parties determine their policies and organisation, not just how they campaign. This article applies the marketing concepts of product, sales and market orientation, combined with tools such as market intelligence, to party behaviour as a whole. Producing a comprehensive theoretical framework, it explores how a product, sales and market‐oriented party would behave and go through a marketing process. This framework is used to analyse the British Labour Party, showing how Labour moved from a product‐oriented approach in 1983, through to a sales orientation in 1987, finally achieving a market orientation – and electoral success – in 1997. This demonstrates the potential of political marketing to deepen our understanding of a wide range of political behaviour.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Paul Chynoweth

The Party Wall etc. Act 1996 makes provision for the service of party structure notices on adjoining property owners where certain types of work are undertaken to party

Abstract

The Party Wall etc. Act 1996 makes provision for the service of party structure notices on adjoining property owners where certain types of work are undertaken to party walls and other structures between neighbouring properties. The paper emphasises the difficulty of determining whether a notice should be served in a particular situation and the importance for property managers of making a correct decision. A systematic approach is proposed whereby each of the component parts of the task is addressed separately before a final decision is made. The paper examines these component parts and applies the relevant legal rules to each in the context of circumstances frequently encountered in practice.

Details

Property Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 23 January 2018

Communist Party control over private businesses.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB229267

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Expert briefing
Publication date: 19 March 2015

Internal party democracy.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB198338

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Expert briefing
Publication date: 27 February 2019

The likely fallout from the resignation of twelve Conservative and Labour MPs and the emergence of the breakaway Independent Group.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB242163

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2004

Christopher R. Moberg and Thomas W. Speh

Warehousing remains the most frequently outsourced logistics activity, but empirical research on the third‐party selection process for warehousing remains scarce. The main…

Abstract

Warehousing remains the most frequently outsourced logistics activity, but empirical research on the third‐party selection process for warehousing remains scarce. The main goals of this research were to identify the most critical factors to customers during third‐party warehousing selection and to compare the perceived performance levels of national and regional third‐party firms on each of the selection criteria. Surveys were sent to warehousing customers in several industries. Responsiveness to service needs, quality of management, and track record of ethical importance were rated by customers as the most important selection criteria. Results indicate that respondents also rated the performance of the typical regional third‐party warehousing firm as significantly better than national firms on six different criteria while national firms were rated significantly higher on only one criterion. It is hoped that this research can provide guidance to logistics managers as they evaluate third‐party warehousing options.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 8 September 2016

Under the proposed merger, around a dozen parties will fold themselves into the new Jubilee Party. These allied parties have committed to running a common set of…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB213465

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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