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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Jackie C. de Vries, Hans de Jonge and Theo J.M. van der Voordt

Real estate is increasingly used as a “fifth” resource to improve the performance of organisations by a positive image, cost reduction, increased employee satisfaction and…

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Abstract

Purpose

Real estate is increasingly used as a “fifth” resource to improve the performance of organisations by a positive image, cost reduction, increased employee satisfaction and increased labour productivity. A clear conceptual framework and standardised key performance indicators (KPIs) are needed to understand and monitor the effects of real estate interventions. This paper aims to explore the added value of real estate interventions to organisational performance, theoretically and empirically, including unforeseen positive and negative side‐effects.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework was based on an extensive literature survey and has been empirically used in a survey among 47 Institues of Higher Professional Education in The Netherlands and additional in‐depth interviews at nine institutes. The effects of real estate interventions were studied by conducting time series analyses of changing organisational performance using several KPIs.

Findings

The research has shown that real estate interventions actually improve organisational performance. However, the effects are not always as positive as expected, nor are they always clearly visible when using the present KPIs for organisational performance. And in addition, some effects are temporary.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework and the suggested KPIs can be used to support managers in effectively steering on organisational performance by means of real estate interventions, formulating targets in a SMART way, setting priorities with regard to their organisation's main objectives, and monitoring the effects.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework integrates know‐how from various studies and fields and was empirically used in educational settings.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Paul Davis and Neil Pyper

– This paper aims to take a new look at how scenarios are produced and used. It does so from a perspective that is unusual in the field: network pragmatism.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to take a new look at how scenarios are produced and used. It does so from a perspective that is unusual in the field: network pragmatism.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a conceptual approach.

Findings

A network pragmatist account allows scenarios to play an important role in actions designed to secure specific futures for organisations. It, thus, endows them with micro-political force. Any scenario that fails to exert this force will wither and, ultimately, die, but it can be resuscitated. With its demise in the networked world, a scenario can assume a more partial and private existence, shaping the affections, loyalties and actions of notable individuals.

Research limitations/implications

This approach generates novel propositions that question the adequacy of currently dominant cognitive theories. However, it has yet to be tested empirically.

Originality/value

Pragmatist reading of scenarios that is proposed is not only distinct but also only ever partial. This work emphasises that a holistic account of scenario lives needs multiple theoretical perspectives.

Details

Foresight, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Kevin Hammond, Harry Harmon, Robert Webster and Mike Rayburn

This article reports the application of marketing planning in an unusual context. It reports the results of a national survey of business school deans in the USA, and…

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Abstract

This article reports the application of marketing planning in an unusual context. It reports the results of a national survey of business school deans in the USA, and examines the possible effects on university business school performance of the use or non‐use of selected marketing planning activities and of selected faculty awards (proxy indicators of the level of importance that business schools might place on certain areas of faculty effort). The relationships that these activities and awards have with one another are measured. Best practices are identified. The number of respondents who employ the various marketing practices is reported, conclusions drawn, limitations identified, and suggestions made for future research.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Robert White and Dallas Hanson

This paper is an empirical response to two of Quattrone’s claims: first, that research in accounting is fragmented; and then that this follows from the blocking of…

1862

Abstract

This paper is an empirical response to two of Quattrone’s claims: first, that research in accounting is fragmented; and then that this follows from the blocking of communication by intra‐ and inter‐disciplinary boundaries. Although we agree with much of Quattrone’s argument, and in particular with his problematising of “economic man”, we draw an opposite conclusion. Rather than looking to a trans‐disciplinary removal of boundaries, we use a survey of 30 years of research in corporate annual reports to defend narrowly disciplinary work. We make our case through discussing problems of intra‐ and inter‐disciplinary unity in research, the puzzle of the role of “economic man” in the study of annual reports, and the alternative to him in science and technology studies (STS). Our approach yields a better fit than Quattrone’s own solution with his aims of an evolutionary perspective that allows for historical shifts, and for a reflexivity that includes the inevitable entanglement of researchers in what they study. We conclude by noting that our approach is applicable to the study of corporate communication more generally.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 April 2020

Catalin Nicolae Albu, Nadia Albu, Flavius Andrei Guinea and Mathew Tsamenyi

This paper investigates the process of translating a costing tool into operational use in the context of a transitional (post-communist) economy, where local institutions…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the process of translating a costing tool into operational use in the context of a transitional (post-communist) economy, where local institutions challenge the rationality of western methods.

Design/methodology/approach

By mobilizing Actor–Network Theory, in particular Callon's four moments of translation, and by drawing data from an interventionist research, the paper focuses on the process of change instilled by the implementation of a costing tool in 20 Romanian construction companies.

Findings

The costing system is initially problematized as a tool for rational decision making. However, the visibility over the accounting figures generated by the costing tool instilled new roles for the cost system to manage internal and external interdependencies. First, two costing datasets were created, one for decision making and one for tax purposes, to manage the relationship with the state taxation authorities. Second, since the costing tool generated visibility over the field practices as well, engineers convinced management to drop the decision-making set of costs. The costing tool ultimately only became used for tax optimization, an originally unintended use, reflecting its translation process.

Research limitations/implications

By taking an interventionist approach, the paper contributes to theorizing accounting in transitional economies by bringing their economic idiosyncrasies into the analysis.

Practical implications

The results inform managers about the intended and unintended consequences of management accounting tools and about actors' role in shaping their use.

Originality/value

Our research responds to recent calls to study how organizations configure their control systems in a rapidly changing environment and what is the role of management accounting in these arrangements.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Riza Casidy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived brand orientation (PBO), satisfaction, loyalty, and post-enrolment communication behaviour in…

1993

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived brand orientation (PBO), satisfaction, loyalty, and post-enrolment communication behaviour in the Australian higher education sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Two hundred and fifty-eight questionnaires were completed by undergraduate students of a particular university in Australia. Structural equation modeling was employed in this study to examine the associations between the constructs.

Findings

This study provides empirical evidence that PBO has a positive and significant relationship with all dependent variables. The research reveals that students' perception of a university's brand orientation is significantly related to satisfaction, loyalty, and post-enrolment communication behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The findings may guide the key decision makers in higher education institutions to understand the importance of brand orientation in their corporate strategy to enhance satisfaction, loyalty, and positive WOM, which can be used to differentiate themselves from other institutions in the highly competitive education market.

Originality/value

Past researchers have not looked into the dynamic relationships between PBO, satisfaction, loyalty, and post-enrolment communication behaviour, and hence research is to be called for in this area. The paper is the first to examine brand orientation from the perspective of the students and provide higher education institutions with recommendations to improve service quality through brand orientation.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Muazu Ibrahim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interactive effect of human capital in financial development–economic growth nexus. Relative to the quantity-based measure of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interactive effect of human capital in financial development–economic growth nexus. Relative to the quantity-based measure of enrolment rates, the main aim was to determine how quality of human capital proxied by pupil–teacher ratio influences the relationship between domestic financial sector development and overall economic growth.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are obtained from the World Development Indicators of the World Bank for 29 sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries over the period 1980–2014. The analyses were conducted using the system generalised method of moments within the endogenous growth framework while controlling for country-specific and time effects. The author also follows Papke and Wooldridge procedure in examining the long-run estimates of the variables of interest.

Findings

The key finding is that, while both human capital and financial development unconditionally promotes growth in both the short and long run, results from the interactive terms suggest that, irrespective of the measure of finance, financial sector development largely spurs growth on the back of quality human capital. This finding is also confirmed by the marginal and net effects where the interactive effect of pupil–teacher ratio and indicators of finance are consistently huge relative to the enrolment. Statistically, the results are robust to model specification.

Practical implications

While it is laudable for SSA countries to increase access to education, it is equally more crucial to increase the supply of teachers at the same time improving on the limited teaching and learning materials. Indeed, there are efforts to develop rather low levels of the financial sector owing to its unconditional growth effects. Beyond the direct benefit of finance, however, higher growth effect of finance is conditioned on the quality level of human capital. The outcome of this study should therefore reignite the recognition of the complementarity role of human capital and finance in economic growth process.

Originality/value

The study makes significant contributions to existing finance–growth literature in so many ways: first, the auhor extend the literature by empirically examining how different measures of human capital shape the finance–economic growth nexus. Through this the author is able to bring a different perspective in the literature highlighting the role of countries’ human capital stock in mediating the impact of financial deepening on economic growth. Second, the author makes a more systematic attempt to evaluate the relative importance of finance and human capital in growth process while controlling for several ancillary variables.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1964

V. AHIER

Bruce Cooper's article highlights an important problem and an attempt was made last year locally to tackle this by having a Youth Employment Officer on duty at evening…

Abstract

Bruce Cooper's article highlights an important problem and an attempt was made last year locally to tackle this by having a Youth Employment Officer on duty at evening institute and College of Technology enrolment nights. The experiment was only a partial success but worth repeating as it was felt that the attempt was justified. It is important, however, that such information and advice is accurate but if Bruce Cooper is going to advise people with no GCE passes to take the examinations of the Chartered Institute of Secretaries, he will run into considerable trouble.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 6 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2018

Kathryn Gay Hardwick-Franco

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to explore the extent to which the South Australian flexible learning option (FLO) secondary school enrolment strategy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to explore the extent to which the South Australian flexible learning option (FLO) secondary school enrolment strategy supports some of the most vulnerable and disengaged students to simultaneously engage in secondary- and higher-education, skills and work-based learning; second, to explore the degree to which this FLO enrolment strategy addresses the United Nations (UN) principles of responsible management education and 17 sustainable development goals.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach includes a practice perspective, field-notes and documents analysis.

Findings

This paper finds the flexibility inherent in the FLO enrolment strategy goes some way to addressing inequity in education outcomes amongst those who traditionally disengage from education and work-based learning. Findings also highlight ways in which the FLO enrolment strategy addresses some of the UN principals and 17 goals.

Research limitations/implications

This paper supports the work of HESWBL by calling for future research into the long-term benefits of flexible education strategies that support HESWBL, through exploring the benefits to young people, from their perspective, with a view to providing accountability.

Social implications

The paper offers an example of a way a practice perspective can explore an education strategy that addresses “wicked problems” (Rittel and Webber, 1973). Currently, “wicked problems” that pervade member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development include intergenerational poverty, under-education and unemployment.

Originality/value

This paper is valuable because it explores from a practice perspective, how a secondary education enrolment strategy supports vulnerable students engage in their secondary schooling, while simultaneously supporting students achieve higher education, skills and work-based learning.

Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Katharina Michaelowa and Anke Weber

Applying the general question of aid effectiveness to the sector of education, this paper provides some evidence for a positive effect of development assistance on primary…

Abstract

Applying the general question of aid effectiveness to the sector of education, this paper provides some evidence for a positive effect of development assistance on primary enrolment and completion. However, even the most optimistic estimates clearly show that at any realistic rate of growth, aid will never be able to move the world markedly closer towards the internationally agreed objective of “Education For All”. Universal primary education requires increased efficiency of educational spending by donors and national governments alike. Moreover, there is some evidence that the recipient countries' general political and institutional background matters. Under conditions of bad governance, the impact of aid on enrolment can actually turn negative.

Details

Theory and Practice of Foreign Aid
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-52765-3

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