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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Arup Varma, Parth Patel, Verma Prikshat, Deepak Hota and Vijay Pereira

Given that the policy is rather comprehensive and detailed, this paper aims to identify some of the key features and discuss the mechanisms by which the benefits of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Given that the policy is rather comprehensive and detailed, this paper aims to identify some of the key features and discuss the mechanisms by which the benefits of the policy might reach all sections of society.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, we analyse India’s new education policy (NEP) and discuss how it might impact education and employment in India and the neighbourhood.

Findings

This paper believes that the NEP (2020) is likely to alter the educational landscape of India and make education accessible to all sections of society. In addition, the impact of this bill will be felt in the Indian workplace.

Research limitations/implications

This paper would urge the policymakers, educationists and corporate leaders to conduct research on the benefits of the NEP in two phases. In the short run, they could study the implementation – in the long run, all three stakeholders should track the changes in the quality of graduates being produced as a result of the new policy.

Originality/value

This is the first known critique of the NEP (2020) written by five Indian-origin academics and practitioners, offering insight into the policy for scholars and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Parth Patel, Brendan Boyle, Mark Bray, Paresha Sinha and Ramudu Bhanugopan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the control mechanisms used by multinational corporations (MNCs) from emerging economies to manage their subsidiaries in developed…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the control mechanisms used by multinational corporations (MNCs) from emerging economies to manage their subsidiaries in developed countries and their implications for human resource management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on data collected through in-depth case studies and interviews with senior subsidiary managers of 12 major Indian information technology (IT) MNCs operating in Australia.

Findings

Indian IT MNCs rely heavily on the use of people-centric controls exerted through global staffing practices (via the transfer of parent-country nationals), which, in turn, influence their subsidiary’s discretion over their HR practices. The use of people-centric controls allows Indian IT multinationals to replicate parent-country HRM practices in their Australian subsidiaries in an ethnocentric manner and significantly leverage the people-based competitive advantages from India through short- and long-term expatriate assignments.

Research limitations/implications

The study investigates control and HRM practices from a single country and a single industry perspective. It provides an insight into the normative means of control in foreign subsidiaries of MNCs and enhances our understanding by explaining the integrated relationship that control mechanisms (and their people-centric components) have with HRM practices including the global staffing approaches and expatriate management practices of emerging MNCs.

Practical implications

Indian MNCs are using their business model to leverage the Australian immigration and skilled visa programme to maintain cost advantages. However, the immigration legislation in developed countries needs to be capable of allowing emerging multinational corporations (EMNCs) to maintain such advantages as developed countries seek to attract foreign direct investment from emerging economies.

Originality/value

The results indicate that the control practices of EMNCs are similar to the controls exerted by MNCs from developed countries. They also show that EMNCs do not adopt a portfolio approach to global staffing, and that the people-centric components of their control have a clear impact on their subsidiaries’ HRM practices.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Parth Patel, Hussain Gulzar Rammal, João J. Ferreira and Verma Prikshat

This study examines how emerging market multinational enterprises operating in the service sector manage knowledge and team members in their overseas subsidiaries and what…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines how emerging market multinational enterprises operating in the service sector manage knowledge and team members in their overseas subsidiaries and what role expatriates play in their operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a multiple case study design and interview 20 senior managers representing 16 Indian IT firm's subsidiaries in Australia. The onsite-offshore concept and the SECI model are used to explain the knowledge management process.

Findings

The findings show that Indian IT firms mostly transfer knowledge from their headquarters in the parent country to their subsidiaries in the host country using the onsite-offshore model where work is divided and coordinated between team members situated between the two locations. Furthermore, the host country subsidiaries have limited independence in decision-making due to a forward, one-way diffusion of knowledge, thus limiting a two-way interaction between the HQ and the subsidiary for opportunities to create and exchange new knowledge.

Originality/value

The study is one of the few to investigate the onsite-offshore phenomenon in service-based emerging market multinational enterprises.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Syed Mohyuddin, Santoshi Sengupta, Parth Patel, Verma Prikshat and Arup Varma

This article aims to examine the challenges faced by highly skilled expatriates (i.e. professionals and managers) from the Indian subcontinent (i.e. India and neighboring…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to examine the challenges faced by highly skilled expatriates (i.e. professionals and managers) from the Indian subcontinent (i.e. India and neighboring countries) as they attempt to advance their careers in Australia. Extant literature has revealed significant gaps between policies for skilled migration proposed by governments in developed countries and the response to policies by organizations in those countries. By employing the theories of habitus, disembedding, sensemaking and acculturation as frameworks for analysis, the authors explore and explain how these expatriates settle and integrate into their new lives and careers as they resolve their experience of habitus.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed phenomenology and narrative research techniques using 21 in-depth, semistructured interviews with expatriate professionals from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh to explore and examine their expatriation experiences and their occupational progress in Australia.

Findings

The findings reveal that on migrating to Australia, expatriate professionals are uprooted from their home country habitus and thrust into new conditions that cause them to lose their cultural, economic, intellectual and social capital, which further leads them into a state of “disembeddedness.” These highly skilled expatriates then rely on sensemaking and acculturation to resolve their crisis of habitus. The authors also found that gender is a significant factor in this process, as female expatriates faced more career-related barriers compared to their male counterparts.

Originality/value

This article brings into focus previously unexamined avenues of expatriation research and proposes a novel theoretical framework that is instrumental in explaining the settlement and integration process of highly skilled professionals from emerging nations.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Santoshi Sengupta, Deeksha Tewari, Syed Mohyuddin, Parth Patel and Verma Prikshat

Drawing from the Job Demands–Resources (JD-R) theory, this paper aims to identify unique job demands, job resources and personal resources in the context of Indian women…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the Job Demands–Resources (JD-R) theory, this paper aims to identify unique job demands, job resources and personal resources in the context of Indian women flexpatriates (IWFs) and understand how they manage to perform in their short-term international assignments (SIAs).

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes a qualitative approach by conducting in-depth interviews of 15 IWFs.

Findings

Thematic analysis reveals dual-role workload, emotional demands and diluted importance of the assignments as job demands; opportunity for professional growth, social support and combination of work and leisure as job resources, and building up of self-esteem and self-efficacy as personal resources. Also, the unique Indian family structure, Indian women's desire to have “me-time” and zeal to strengthen their identity emerge as differentiating factors for IWFs that enhance their performance.

Practical implications

IWFs are enthusiastic to take up SIAs as it gives them opportunity to enhance their career and strengthen their identity. In addition to their willingness to travel, advance planning of SIAs and profiling of women based on marital status, family type and children can be done for selection.

Social implications

Despite hailing from paternalistic and male-dominating society and facing familial challenges, IWFs find SIAs liberating, which gives them an opportunity to spend some “me-time,” strengthen their identity and enhance their professional growth.

Originality/value

This is the first qualitative study contextualizing flexpatriation with gender and region by studying Indian women professionals.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Sanjeev Kumar, Prikshat Verma, Parth Patel and J. Irudhaya Rajesh

This research examines Indian service managers' perceptions on impact of convergent technologies on their work and resultant organisational performance. The research uses…

Abstract

Purpose

This research examines Indian service managers' perceptions on impact of convergent technologies on their work and resultant organisational performance. The research uses four dimensions – task productivity, task innovation, customer satisfaction and management control – taken together, to investigate the perceived impact of convergent technologies adoption in service organisations context and further examines the resultant organisational performance, based on these dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used partial least squares (PLS) approach to evaluate the measurement model and the structural model. The study was conducted in service industry firms that have made a significant progression towards adopting convergent technologies.

Findings

The results of the study demonstrated higher levels of perceived impact of adoption of convergent technologies on all the four dimensions (i.e. task productivity, task innovation, customer satisfaction and management control). The results of the study also indicate that all the impact dimensions positively influence organisational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the study suggest that all the impact dimensions positively influence organisation, therefore the service sector managers should be aware about the role of adopting latest convergent technologies so as to enhance the task productivity, innovation, customer satisfaction and management control in their job roles.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this research are derived on the basis of Future of Work, Labour Market Information Systems, Productivity, Enterprise Development, Enhancing skills of service employees and Employability themes.

Originality/value

To researchers best knowledge is to first study of its kind to evaluate the perceived impact of convergent technologies on organisational performance in Indian context.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Hetal Chauhan, Kirit Modi and Saurabh Shrivastava

The COVID-19 pandemic situation is increasing day by day and has affected the lifestyle and economy worldwide. Due to the absence of specific treatment, the only way to…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic situation is increasing day by day and has affected the lifestyle and economy worldwide. Due to the absence of specific treatment, the only way to control a pandemic is by stopping its spread. Early identification of affected persons is urgently in demand. Diagnostic methods applied in hospitals are time-consuming, which delay the identification of positive patients. This study aims to develop machine learning-based diagnosis model which can predict positive cases and helps in decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, the authors have developed a diagnosis model to check coronavirus positivity based on an artificial neural network. The authors have trained the model with clinically assessed symptoms, patient-reported symptoms, other medical histories and exposure data of the person. The authors have explored filter-based feature selection methods such as Chi2, ANOVA F-score and Mutual Information for improving performance of a classification model. Metrics used to evaluate performance of the model are accuracy, precision, sensitivity and F1-score.

Findings

The authors got highest classification performance with model trained with features ranked according to ANOVA FS method. Highest scores for accuracy, sensitivity, precision and F1-score of predictions are 0.93, 0.99, 0.94 and 0.93, respectively. The study reveals that most relevant predictors for COVID-19 diagnosis are sob severity, cough severity, sob presence, cough presence, fatigue and number of days since symptom onset.

Originality/value

Treatment for COVID-19 is not available to date. The best way to control this pandemic is the isolation of positive persons. It is very much necessary to identify positive persons at an early stage. RT-PCR test used to check COVID-19 positivity is the time-consuming, expensive and laborious method. Current diagnosis methods used in hospital demand more medical resources with increasing cases of coronavirus that introduce shortage of resources. The developed model provides solution to the problem cheaper and faster decreases the immediate need for medical resources and helps in decision-making.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2019

Jacqueline Sachse

Web search is more and more moving into mobile contexts. However, screen size of mobile devices is limited and search engine result pages face a trade-off between offering…

Abstract

Purpose

Web search is more and more moving into mobile contexts. However, screen size of mobile devices is limited and search engine result pages face a trade-off between offering informative snippets and optimal use of space. One factor clearly influencing this trade-off is snippet length. The purpose of this paper is to find out what snippet size to use in mobile web search.

Design/methodology/approach

For this purpose, an eye-tracking experiment was conducted showing participants search interfaces with snippets of one, three or five lines on a mobile device to analyze 17 dependent variables. In total, 31 participants took part in the study. Each of the participants solved informational and navigational tasks.

Findings

Results indicate a strong influence of page fold on scrolling behavior and attention distribution across search results. Regardless of query type, short snippets seem to provide too little information about the result, so that search performance and subjective measures are negatively affected. Long snippets of five lines lead to better performance than medium snippets for navigational queries, but to worse performance for informational queries.

Originality/value

Although space in mobile search is limited, this study shows that longer snippets improve usability and user experience. It further emphasizes that page fold plays a stronger role in mobile than in desktop search for attention distribution.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 71 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2020

Nicole Böhmer and Heike Schinnenburg

Talent scarcity in emerging economies such as India poses challenges for companies, and limited labour market participation among well-educated women has been observed…

Abstract

Purpose

Talent scarcity in emerging economies such as India poses challenges for companies, and limited labour market participation among well-educated women has been observed. The reasons that professionals decide not to pursue a further corporate career remain unclear. By investigating career decision-making, this article aims to highlight (1) the contextual factors that impact those decisions, (2) individuals' agency to handle them and (3) the implications for talent management (TM).

Design/methodology/approach

Following a qualitative research design, computer-aided analysis was conducted on interviews with 24 internationally experienced Indian business professionals. A novel application of neo-institutionalism in the Indian context was combined with the family-relatedness of work decisions (FRWD) model.

Findings

Career decisions indicate that rebellion against Indian societal and family expectations is essential to following a career path, especially for women. TM as part of the current institutional framework serves as a legitimising façade veiling traditional practices that hinder females' careers.

Research limitations/implications

Interviewees adopted a retrospective perspective when describing their career decisions; therefore, different views might have existed at the moment of decision-making.

Practical implications

Design and implementation of gender-sensitive TM adjusted to fit the specific Indian context can contribute to retaining female talent in companies and the labour market.

Originality/value

The importance of gender-sensitive TM can be concluded from an empirical study of the context-based career decision-making of experienced business professionals from India. The synthesis of neo-institutionalism, the FRWD model and the research results provides assistance in mapping talent experiences and implications for overcoming the challenges of talent scarcity in India.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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