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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Elena Monserrath Jerves, Lucia De Haene, Peter Rober and Paul Enzlin

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between parental migration and adolescents’ styles of close relationships with parents, friends and romantic partners.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between parental migration and adolescents’ styles of close relationships with parents, friends and romantic partners.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 197 adolescents from Cuenca (Ecuador) participated in the study, of which 35% reported a background of parental migration. The Behavioral Systems Questionnaire was used to assess participants’ relational styles.

Findings

The study reveals that, although parental migration is associated with the development of lower secure styles for parents and friends, it is not associated with the development of insecure styles. Moreover, parental migration does not appear to be associated with the development of romantic styles. Based on the differential impact of the migration of one or two parents, the migration of two parents appeared to have a stronger association with lower secure styles.

Originality/value

The results are discussed in light of the socio-cultural context in which parental migration occurs in Ecuador, which may offer clue variables in shaping the relational styles of adolescents. The study addresses an important consequence of migration focusing on a scarce studies group, adolescents who stay in their home country while their parents migrate. Moreover, its main findings challenge the preconceptions that parent-child separations necessarily involve a direct negative impact on relational functioning.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2015

Igor Gurkov

The aim of the chapter is to evaluate the concept of corporate parenting styles, identify missing elements in the theoretical constructs, and develop new theoretical constructs.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the chapter is to evaluate the concept of corporate parenting styles, identify missing elements in the theoretical constructs, and develop new theoretical constructs.

Methodology/approach

The chapter provides a summary of the existing literature on corporate parenting styles and uncovers the missing elements in the theoretical constructs. New theoretical constructs fill the gaps.

Findings

The chapter presents a new typology of corporate parenting style by combining corporate parents’ processes of adding value to and extracting value from subsidiaries. The five-type typology of corporate styles outlines the different levels of value addition and value extraction and various degrees of reciprocity in both processes. This chapter determines the most important factors that affect the selection of corporate parenting style. It postulates that the multinational corporation should exhibit different parenting styles toward its subsidiaries simultaneously and should be ready to amend its parenting styles to reflect changes in a subsidiary’s strategy and its motives for corporate ownership.

Research limitations/implications

A new agenda for empirical studies oriented toward variability of parenting styles is proposed. Empirical tests of our propositions are needed. I encourage researchers to extend our research by considering the regional (supra-national), industry, and individual levels of analyses.

Originality/value

The chapter provides a more realistic view of corporate parenting styles than that found in the previous literature and outlines promising directions for further theoretical and empirical research.

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Book part
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Rachel Pasternak

Purpose – This chapter presents a new model for the classification of parental discipline styles (PDS), constructed in an attempt to understand the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter presents a new model for the classification of parental discipline styles (PDS), constructed in an attempt to understand the relationship between parenting and children's school success. The model includes six PDSs, based on four criteria: making demands, enforcement, punishment, and responsiveness to children's requests.

Methodology – Methodology includes quantitative research based on self-report questionnaire.

Finding – The findings indicate that (1) PDS has a crucial effect on a child's academic achievement even after controlling for parents’ and children's demographic characteristics; (2) The progressive authoritative style has the greatest effect on academic achievement, whereas the punitive style has the smallest effect; and (3) punishment has a negative effect on academic achievement, whereas responsiveness to children's requests has the greatest positive effect.

Originality/value – PDS is distinguished from the broader concept parenting style in its reference to the daily behaviors that comprise the exercise of discipline.

Practical implications – Awareness of the salience of discipline for improving academic achievement can influence patterns of parenting in general, and PDS in particular.

Social implications – PDS indicates the quality of the education and socialization being transmitted. It has a crucial impact on children's school success that is crucial for occupational and economic success.

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Virgina Canegallo, Erika Broccoli, Mauro Cavarra, Erika Santoddì and Rosa Angela Fabio

Taking into account previous literature on the role that the parenting styles to which individuals are exposed to during childhood have in shaping prosocial behaviors and…

Abstract

Purpose

Taking into account previous literature on the role that the parenting styles to which individuals are exposed to during childhood have in shaping prosocial behaviors and attitudes, this study aims to investigate the relationship between parenting styles of parents and peace attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

The peace attitude and the parenting style questionnaires were completed by 358 adolescent and adult participants. Pearson correlation coefficients were extracted and a stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed.

Findings

The results indicate that individuals with authoritative parents tend to show stronger peace attitudes and open the way to further study what parental characteristics may be responsible for the development of peace attitudes in individuals.

Research limitations/implications

Participants retrospectively assessed their parentsstyle. Future research may recruit both the actual parents of participants to collect more accurate data on parenting practices or use observational methods.

Social implications

This work seems to suggest that to achieve a more peaceful society, the ability of parents to raise their children by adopting an authoritative style should be taken into account and – if needed – enhanced. Understanding the developmental pathways that can influence individuals to consistently choose peace is important to promote a stable culture of peace across several levels of observation.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the relationship between parenting styles of parents and peace attitudes in their children.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2018

Narges Adibsereshki, Mahdi Abdollahzadeh Rafi, Maryam Hassanzadeh Aval and Hassan Tahan

Anxiety disorders have a high prevalence in children. Those children with anxious symptoms are more likely to experience significant disruption in their lives. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Anxiety disorders have a high prevalence in children. Those children with anxious symptoms are more likely to experience significant disruption in their lives. This disruption can interrupt or even stop a child from participating in a variety of typical childhood experiences. It is understood that genetic and environmental factors may cause this disorder. The purpose of this paper is to focus on environmental factors, namely, the mediating role of maladaptive schemas in mothers’ child-rearing and childhood anxiety disorders.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used correlation-modeling to assess the analysis. The sample included 326 students (aged 9-12 years old) and their mothers. The parenting style (Baumrind, 1973), Early Maladaptive Schema (Rijkeboer and de Boo, 2010), and anxiety disorders (Muris et al., 2006) questionnaires were used in this study.

Findings

The results showed a relationship between parenting styles of mothers and childhood anxiety disorders, a significant correlation between childhood maladaptive schemas and childhood anxiety disorders, a relation between child-rearing styles and childhood maladaptive schemas, and finally a mediating role on childhood anxiety disorders and mothers’ child-rearing styles for some childhood maladaptive schemas.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the knowledge base of the importance of children’s mental health. The paper analyzes the relationship of mothers’ parenting styles and children’s anxiety. It also focuses on maladaptive schemas as a mediator and its relationship with childhood anxiety disorders.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Gregory R Maio, Frank D Fincham, Camillo Regalia and F.Giorgia Paleari

Parents and children can drive each other mad. At one moment, a parent may be encouraging and affectionate toward the child; in the next, the parent may be sending the…

Abstract

Parents and children can drive each other mad. At one moment, a parent may be encouraging and affectionate toward the child; in the next, the parent may be sending the child to his or her bedroom. Similarly, a child who seems helpful and cooperative can suddenly turn belligerent. Parents and children may partly resolve the mixture of negative and positive feelings they experience in such situations by remembering their basic love for each other. Nevertheless, the conflicting sentiments will be stored in the memory of both parties, contributing to a long-lasting melange of conflicting beliefs, feelings, and behaviors. What are the psychological consequences of this state of affairs in relationships?

Details

Intergenerational Ambivalences: New Perspectives on Parent-Child Relations in Later Life
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-801-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Philippa McTaggart and Matthew Sanders

The present study examined the role of socio‐demographic and family risk factors as mediators or moderators of the success of parents undertaking a universal group parent

Abstract

The present study examined the role of socio‐demographic and family risk factors as mediators or moderators of the success of parents undertaking a universal group parent training programme for young children. The results showed that parents' capacity to change dysfunctional parenting practices was not moderated by the child's gender, family income, family type, or pre‐intervention level of parental stress, but was partially mediated by changes in parental satisfaction and efficacy. Irrespective of their socio‐demographic background, parents who completed the Triple‐P Positive Parenting Programme were equally likely to succeed in changing their parenting practices. These findings suggest the robustness of intervention effects across a diverse range of parents.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Kirsten Jane Robertson, Robert Aitken, Maree Thyne and Leah Watkins

This paper aims to explore the correlates of parental mediation of pre-schoolers’ television advertising exposure, focusing on the influence of other siblings in the home.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the correlates of parental mediation of pre-schoolers’ television advertising exposure, focusing on the influence of other siblings in the home.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included 486 parents of pre-schoolers. A cross-sectional design involving a quantitative online survey measured the number and age of children in the home, parents’ mediation styles and advertising attitudes, parents’ levels of education and pre-schoolers’ television exposure.

Findings

Co-viewing was the most frequent viewing experience followed by instructive and restrictive mediation. A univariate analysis revealed that parental education and negative attitudes towards advertising were associated with less viewing time for pre-schoolers, although the presence of other siblings mediated this relationship. Logistic regression revealed mediation styles were associated with parental education, attitudes towards advertising, viewing time and the presence of other siblings. Pre-schoolers with an older sibling were less likely to experience co-viewing and more likely to experience instructive mediation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings revealed that parents of pre-schoolers are concerned about advertising to children and actively mediate their child’s exposure. Parental attitudes and education, and sibling composition influence pre-schoolers’ television consumption, and pre-schoolers with an older sibling might be most vulnerable to negative media effects. The sample was limited to primarily higher educated parents and might not generalize.

Originality/value

The study extends the field by focusing on pre-schoolers and provides novel insights into the influence of sibling composition on television consumption.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Shona M. Bettany and Ben Kerrane

This study aims to offer understanding of the parent – child relationship by examining, through a socio-material lens, how one aspect of the new child surveillance…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to offer understanding of the parent – child relationship by examining, through a socio-material lens, how one aspect of the new child surveillance technology market, child GPS trackers (CGT), are rejected or adopted by families, highlighting implications for child welfare, privacy and children’s rights policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors gathered netnographic data from a range of online sources (parenting forums, online product reviews, discussion boards) that captured parental views towards the use of CGT and stories of the technology in use and theorize the data through application of a novel combination of neutralisation and affordance theory.

Findings

The research reveals how critics of CGT highlight the negative affordances of such product use (highlighting the negative agency of the technology). Parental adopters of CGT, in turn, attempt to rationalize their use of the technology as a mediator in the parent – child relation through utilisation of a range of neutralisation mechanisms which re-afford positive product agency. Implications for child welfare and policy are discussed in the light of those findings.

Originality/value

The paper presents an empirical, qualitative understanding of parents negotiating the emergence of a controversial new child-related technology – CGT – and its impact upon debates in the field of parenting and childhood; develops the theory of parental style towards parental affordances, using a socio-material theoretical lens to augment existing sociological approaches; and contributes to the debates surrounding child welfare, ethics, privacy and human rights in the context of child surveillance GPS technologies.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2018

Rom Eldad and Joy Benatov

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of both attachment and parental styles in shaping leadership behavioral patterns. Research predictions were that childhood…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of both attachment and parental styles in shaping leadership behavioral patterns. Research predictions were that childhood perceived parental experiences will be associated with attachment style, and that both perceived parental and attachment styles will fulfill a significant role in shaping the individual’s leadership orientation in adulthood.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested the research hypotheses with a field survey data from 90 supervisors belonging to diverse industrial and service organizations. During their attendance in a leadership seminar, the managers’ attachment style was assessed using the Experiences in Close Relationship Inventory. They were also asked to report on their childhood experiences using the Parenting Style Index, and to answer questions regarding their leadership behavior, using a short version of the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire.

Findings

Results indicated associations between parental style, attachment style, and leadership. Specifically, parental autonomy granting was negatively associated with both attachment anxiety and avoidance. Both transformational and transactional leadership styles were positively associated with parental autonomy, but only transformational leadership was also positively associated with parental involvement. In addition, transactional leadership was positively associated with attachment avoidance in close relationships.

Research limitations/implications

Testing the contributions of perceived parental style in childhood and attachment style in adulthood to the manager’s manifested leadership style helps to advance our theoretical understanding of important leadership antecedents. The findings may also help practitioners in developing leadership skills and assisting managers in finding ways to moderate their natural tendencies and better depend on, delegate, and empower subordinates.

Originality/value

This empirical study provides evidence of the important role of perceived parental style in the development of adult attachment and leadership styles. The effects found in the study also extend the existing findings by showing that not only the attachment style but also parental style play a significant role in shaping the individual’s leadership behaviors.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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