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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Yi-Ping Shih, Wen-Hsu Lin and Chin-Chun Yi

This chapter aims to delineate the indigenous pattern of parental involvement in Taiwan by investigating the effects of specific practices in schools and in the family…

Abstract

This chapter aims to delineate the indigenous pattern of parental involvement in Taiwan by investigating the effects of specific practices in schools and in the family, such as school selection, school involvement, preparing a study place at home, and providing nutritious food.

We use two waves of data from the Taiwan Youth Project (2000, 2003) to examine how parental involvement varies between dual- and single-earner families, and we further demonstrate how sons and daughters have different access in terms of recognizing their parents’ effort, and how children’s subjective appraisals promote their academic performance with respect to test scores.

We find that dual-earner families have higher incomes, higher educational levels, and have fewer children than single-earner ones. Our multivariate analyses show that parental involvement does increase youngsters’ Basic Competence Test (BCT) score. However, we are unable to find any direct or indirect effects from parental employment status on BCT scores. Further analysis indicates that the relationship between parental school involvement and BCT score is only significant among dual-earner families, but not for the single-earner ones. In addition, our multiple group analysis reveals that sons’ BCT scores are affected more by parents’ school involvement, whereas daughters’ are affected more by special home provision. Our findings from adolescents’ subjective responses imply that sons may be more responsive to a non-familial context in contrast with daughters, who react more positively to familial provision.

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The Work-Family Interface: Spillover, Complications, and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-112-4

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2006

Hyunjoon Park

Numerous studies in the United States have found that various forms of parental involvement in children's education positively affect children's educational outcomes such…

Abstract

Numerous studies in the United States have found that various forms of parental involvement in children's education positively affect children's educational outcomes such as high school dropout (McNeal, 1999; Teachman, Paasch, & Carver, 1997), post-secondary educational attainment (Sandefur, Frisco, Faulkner, & Park, 2004), and academic achievement (Epstein, 2001; Ho Sui-Chu & Willms, 1996; Muller, 1993, 1995). Researchers distinguish two dimensions of parental involvement depending on the context in which parents become involved (Downey, 2002; Ho Sui-Chu & Willms, 1996; Muller & Kerbow, 1993).1 The first dimension of parental involvement represents what parents do at home and studies particularly have focused on the extent to which parent–child discussion on children's schooling, parenting style, and parents’ monitoring or rule-setting affect student's academic achievement and behavior. The other dimension of parental involvement includes parent participation in school activities and parent–teacher interaction. In particular, the literature has extensively examined the effects of attending parent–teacher organization (PTO) meetings or school events, and contacting teachers and school officials.

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The Impact of Comparative Education Research on Institutional Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-308-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Zehava Rosenblatt and Daniel Peled

Using structural equations modeling, this study explored the association between school ethical climate (characterized by values of caring, rules and a professional code…

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Abstract

Using structural equations modeling, this study explored the association between school ethical climate (characterized by values of caring, rules and a professional code) and two types of parental involvement: cooperation‐based and conflict‐based. The mediating effects of perceived parental influence and trust and parents’ socioeconomic (SES) level were considered as well. School‐level data were obtained from 157 teachers representing 20 elementary schools in Israel, and individual‐level data were obtained from 936 parents. Results showed that an ethical climate characterized by rules and a professional code was more common and more strongly related to parental involvement than a caring climate. Different patterns were detected for the two SES groups: high‐SES parents tended to be less involved (both cooperation‐wise and conflict‐wise) than low‐SES ones when the school climate was perceived as more ethical. Results have implications for research on school values and school culture.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

A. Keetanjaly, Suhaida Abdul Kadir, Wong Su Luan and Arnida Abdullah

The involvement of parents in schools and their contribution towards their children’s academic learning have been a focal point in educational research. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The involvement of parents in schools and their contribution towards their children’s academic learning have been a focal point in educational research. The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors that influence parental involvement in secondary schools and subsequently proposed a comprehensive parental involvement model.

Design/methodology/approach

Research articles, reports and dissertations on the factors that influence parental involvement were reviewed to obtain related empirical evidence for the development of a workable model.

Findings

A conceptual framework was proposed to understand the factors that influence parental involvement. The role of creativity in principals’ leadership practices and parental involvement in secondary schools were found to be related. Additionally, this relationship was found to be mediated by school practices and school climate.

Research limitations/implications

A framework on the factors that influence parental involvement guided by literature review and three main hypotheses for testing were proposed, which require further empirical assessment.

Practical implications

The school–parent partnership shares a common understanding of the educational needs and social development of the children. The school administrators, school community, stakeholders and related policymakers can effectively leverage the findings of this study in the effort to enhance parental involvement within the school context.

Originality/value

Only a handful of research-based studies probed into the factors that influence parental involvement in secondary schools within the Malaysian context. This study identified several significant factors that enhance parental involvement in secondary schools.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Peter Kiplangat Koross, Moses Waithanji Ngware and Anthony Kiplangat Sang

The management of secondary schools in Kenya has faced a number of challenges over the past few years. These challenges have been manifested in the many ways including…

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Abstract

Purpose

The management of secondary schools in Kenya has faced a number of challenges over the past few years. These challenges have been manifested in the many ways including lack of financial transparency, which culminate in unaffordable secondary schools fees. The aim of this paper is to present the findings of an investigation into the contribution of parents to the financial management of secondary schools in Kericho district of Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was exploratory in approach with a descriptive survey being used as a method of inquiry. A sample size of 30 (47 percent) was selected from 64 secondary schools in the district. From this sample, proportional sampling was then used to get seven provincial and 23 district schools into the sample. Purposive sampling was used to get the schools from each category and the respondents from each school into the sample. Questionnaires and interview schedules were used to solicit information and perceptions from principals and students.

Findings

The findings of this study indicated that Principals and students perceived parental involvement in financial management as present to some degree in most schools. The results also indicated that parental involvement had positive influence on financial management outcomes. Since schools' finance is critical in school management outcomes, it is therefore important for education stakeholders to increase parental involvement.

Practical implications

Parental participation can have positive impacts on the processes of teaching and learning with active and frequent contacts between parents and school administration improving school's financial accountability and transparency. Participation will strengthen the partnership between parent teacher associations, community and school administration in addition to democratizing school governance.

Originality/value

Based on the findings of the study, parental involvement in the area of financial management is still low in the district. It was also noted that parental involvement greatly influenced the way finances in schools were managed. From these observations, parental levels of involvement in the area of school finances affect financial transparency in schools.

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Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Book part
Publication date: 5 August 2011

Yingyi Ma

Purpose – This chapter focuses on the family and school influences on the achievement gaps in math and reading by gender, race, and nativity.Methodology – With the…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter focuses on the family and school influences on the achievement gaps in math and reading by gender, race, and nativity.

Methodology – With the longitudinal data from the National Education Longitudinal Studies, this chapter uses panel data technique to model for the changes of the achievement from the three time points of observation, 8th grade, 10th grade, and 12th grade. This study proposes the concept of “low-level constrained curriculum” to characterize the curriculum structure that leads to the universal low level of course taking among students within the same school.

Findings – The analysis shows that this kind of curriculum structure has the most damaging effect on individual students' math achievement outcomes. For the analysis on parental involvement, the results show that school involvement is more effective than home involvement for math achievement, but not for reading. Domain-specific parental involvement is more important than general parental involvement for both math and reading. These findings have important theoretical and policy implications.

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The Well-Being, Peer Cultures and Rights of Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-075-9

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Fiona S. Baker and Rida Blaik Hourani

The purpose of this exploratory study is to explore parent and school administrator perspectives on the value and nature of parent involvement in the city of Abu Dhabi…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory study is to explore parent and school administrator perspectives on the value and nature of parent involvement in the city of Abu Dhabi through their perceptions of roles and responsibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is conducted in a random purposive sample of Public–Private Partnership schools during Abu Dhabi Education Council’s school reform.

Findings

Findings show that while both administrators and parents agree on the value of parental involvement, the perceptions of their own and each others’ roles and responsibilities means that parent involvement is characterized by unfulfilled expectations.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made to arrive at realistic roles and responsibilities for parent involvement and recommendations for a model of mutually responsive practice to evolve within a policy framework, with the support of ADEC, and informed by international and locally based research.

Originality/value

The paper sheds light on a new educational dimension beyond curricula and instruction.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Melissa M. Yang

Guided by Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological System’s model, this study documented acculturation and parental involvement in low-income Chinese immigrant homes that serve as…

Abstract

Guided by Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological System’s model, this study documented acculturation and parental involvement in low-income Chinese immigrant homes that serve as predictors of parental mediation. By surveying 165 parents of 3–13-year-old immigrant children, this study found that low-income Chinese parents enacted restrictive mediation the most and exhibited a slow acculturation process even after an average of seven years of emigration. Higher parental acculturation was related to a higher use of active and restrictive mediation. Additionally, different aspects of parental involvement also served as predictors of the three mediation strategies. Chinese cultural emphasis on academic excellence and success was used to help interpret the findings. Future research should consider implementing research-based adult media literacy programs for immigrant parents to help them practice their parental mediation skills in the host culture.

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Media and Power in International Contexts: Perspectives on Agency and Identity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-455-2

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Khalid Arar, Muhammed Abu Nasra and Hassan Alshafi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of parental involvement among 317 teachers in the Arab education system in Israel.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of parental involvement among 317 teachers in the Arab education system in Israel.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire measured teachers’ attitudes regarding parents’ involvement in the school relating to pedagogy, resources, and control.

Findings

The findings show that Arab teachers perceive parents’ involvement as related to pedagogy and resources rather than control. In addition, the research results revealed that young teachers in terms of age, and seniority of teaching, and teachers who are not members of the management team demonstrated a stronger perception of the pedagogy and control components than did older and senior teachers and teachers who are members of the management team. However, older and senior teachers and teachers who are members of the management team had a stronger perception that parental involvement related to resources than did young teachers and teachers who are not members of the management team.

Social implications

Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to our understandings of the different components that affect parental involvement in developing and minority societies.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Jill C. Bradley-Geist and Julie B. Olson-Buchanan

The purpose of this paper is to examine antecedents and consequences of parental involvement and over-parenting as it relates to college students’ college experiences and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine antecedents and consequences of parental involvement and over-parenting as it relates to college students’ college experiences and workplace expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was completed by 482 undergraduate college students; the survey contained questions about parenting behaviors, personality and demographic items, and workplace scenarios to which participants responded.

Findings

Statistical analyses revealed that over-parenting was more common when college students lived at home and had fewer siblings. Additionally, over-parenting (but not parental involvement) was associated with lower student self-efficacy as well as maladaptive responses to workplace scenarios.

Research limitations/implications

Data are correlational and were collected from students only. Future longitudinal research that includes the parent and employer perspective is needed.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to empirically examine the antecedents and outcomes associated with over-parenting. Over-parenting is assessed in relation to college and workplace outcomes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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