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Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2017

Maya Manian

As numerous scholars have noted, the law takes a strikingly incoherent approach to adolescent reproduction. States overwhelmingly allow a teenage girl to independently…

Abstract

As numerous scholars have noted, the law takes a strikingly incoherent approach to adolescent reproduction. States overwhelmingly allow a teenage girl to independently consent to pregnancy care and medical treatment for her child, and even to give up her child for adoption, all without notice to her parents, but require parental notice or consent for abortion. This chapter argues that this oft-noted contradiction in the law on teenage reproductive decision-making is in fact not as contradictory as it first appears. A closer look at the law’s apparently conflicting approaches to teenage abortion and teenage childbirth exposes common ground that scholars have overlooked. The chapter compares the full spectrum of minors’ reproductive rights and unmasks deep similarities in the law on adolescent reproduction – in particular an undercurrent of desire to punish (female) teenage sexuality, whether pregnant girls choose abortion or childbirth. It demonstrates that in practice, the law undermines adolescents’ reproductive rights, whichever path of pregnancy resolution they choose. At the same time that the law thwarts adolescents’ access to abortion care, it also fails to protect adolescents’ rights as parents. The analysis shows that these two superficially conflicting sets of rules in fact work in tandem to enforce a traditional gender script – that self-sacrificing mothers should give birth and give up their infants to better circumstances, no matter the emotional costs to themselves. This chapter also suggests novel policy solutions to the difficulties posed by adolescent reproduction by urging reforms that look to third parties other than parents or the State to better support adolescent decision-making relating to pregnancy and parenting.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-344-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Ping Wang, Wenli Fan and Qiao Li

To support vaccine decision-making, a growing number of parents use online communities to obtain informational and emotional support; however, relatively high information…

Abstract

Purpose

To support vaccine decision-making, a growing number of parents use online communities to obtain informational and emotional support; however, relatively high information heterogeneity and polarization in the online environment make it challenging for parents to make informed vaccine decisions based on the systematic processing of conflicting information. In this context, this study aims to focus on the relationship between parents’ knowledge integration and rational and experiential decision-making and the mediating effect of anxiety on this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model incorporating the direct and indirect effects of knowledge integration and anxiety on decision-making is proposed and tested through partial least squares structural equation modeling with survey data from 223 parents.

Findings

Knowledge integration negatively affects anxiety. Knowledge integration has a direct positive effect on rational decision-making and an indirect negative effect on experiential decision-making.

Practical implications

These insights into the key role of knowledge integration in parental vaccine decision-making under information heterogeneity and polarization provide support for practical strategies to encourage knowledge integration and alleviate anxiety in online communities.

Originality/value

This study underscores the importance of knowledge integration in vaccine decision-making under information heterogeneity and polarization and reveals distinct mechanisms underlying the effects of knowledge integration on decision-making dominated by rational and experiential modes. The findings also provide insights into the information processing mechanisms underlying the knowledge integration of subjects with insufficient prior knowledge in the non-organizational context.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2017

Dorit Rubinstein Reiss

Much of the discussion surrounding the antivaccine movement focuses on the decision of parents to not vaccinate their children and the resulting danger posed to others…

Abstract

Much of the discussion surrounding the antivaccine movement focuses on the decision of parents to not vaccinate their children and the resulting danger posed to others. However, the primary risk is borne by the child left unvaccinated. Although living in a developed country with high vaccination rates provides a certain amount of protection through population immunity, the unvaccinated child is still exposed to a considerably greater risk of preventable diseases than one who is vaccinated. I explore the tension between parental choice and the child’s right to be free of preventable diseases. The chapter’s goal is twofold: to advocate for moving from a dyadic framework – considering the interests of the parents against those of the state – to a triadic one, in which the interests of the child are given as much weight as those of the parent and the state; and to discuss which protections are available, and how they can be improved. Specific legal tools available to protect that child are examined, including tort liability of the parents to the child, whether and to what degree criminal law has a role, under what circumstances parental choice should be overridden, and the role of school immunization requirements in protecting the individual child.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-811-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Vytautas Dikcius, Indre Pikturniene and James Reardon

Although there is a common agreement that children participate and impact parental purchase decisions, the research results are rather inconsistent. One of the reasons for…

Abstract

Purpose

Although there is a common agreement that children participate and impact parental purchase decisions, the research results are rather inconsistent. One of the reasons for the differences in the findings could be attributable to different operationalisations of a child engagement variable in surveys. This study aims to classify the instruments used to measure children engagement in parental purchase decisions and to develop a typology of these instruments.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 67 articles that reported details and results of the surveys where a variable of children engagement in family decisions was operationalised were selected on a systematic basis. In total, 82 measures were extracted, reviewed and assigned to the particular category.

Findings

The typology of measures of children engagement into parental purchase decisions was developed. The features of particular measures, as well as their applicability for different types of child engagement measurement, are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of articles was limited to nine major scholarly databases and framed for 1985-2015, excluding conference presentations, dissertations, studies and other types of primary research publications.

Practical implications

The analysis demonstrates that authors who had seemingly similar or the same purpose of measuring variable of child engagement into parental purchase decision in fact have used different measures. The differences in measures tend to produce different size of engagement effect. The proposed typology will support scholarly community in establishing more clear definitions and measures of children engagement in parental purchase decision domain.

Originality/value

The typology of measures of children engagement into parental purchase decision is the first attempt to introduce systematised approach toward different domains within the field and their measurement.

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Lisa S. McNeill and Lucy Turner

This paper aims not only to provide an insight into the nature of the relationship between parental financial role modelling and consumption behaviour of young people, but…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims not only to provide an insight into the nature of the relationship between parental financial role modelling and consumption behaviour of young people, but also to explore the consumer socialization process that children undergo in the parent‐child dyad.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research in the form of personal in‐depth interviews was conducted in order to extract new knowledge and reach a greater understanding regarding the impact that this relationship may have on future consumption behaviours within the youth market.

Findings

It is clear that parents are able to exert a huge amount of influence over the financial behaviour of their children (although this obviously differs between families) and are able to do so through the informal teaching of financial lessons, by allowing children to observe their own financial patterns and by guiding their children through significant financial decisions by offering advice and approval (or disapproval) when asked. Key financial attitudes and behaviours of young home‐leavers are almost directly related to the parental financial education they received whilst growing up and still living at home and in many cases parental influence is still present even once the child has moved away from home and is responsible for making their own financial decisions.

Research limitations/implications

Although there are limitations, the present study does have implications for the impact parents can have on the spending behaviour of their children; it may be that the most important thing parents can do is teach their children about financial responsibility and successful consumer decisions at a young age so that they grow up with these life skills.

Practical implications

In terms of practical implications, by identifying the specific areas where financial knowledge and awareness may be lacking, the research may help educational and financial institutions to design financial management courses in order to help young people achieve greater financial freedom.

Social implications

The paper reveals the characteristics of the consumption relationship children enjoy with their parents, describing the role of financial education within families and conceptualising the various forms of consumption relationships that exist between young consumers and their parents.

Originality/value

The relationship between parental influence and youth consumption behaviour has already been identified using quantitative research methods but very little is known about the actual extent of this relationship, which is addressed by this paper.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2013

Gurvinder S. Shergill, Harjit Sekhon and Min Zhao

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cultural assimilation influence on family purchase decision making of Chinese immigrant families in New Zealand, and in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cultural assimilation influence on family purchase decision making of Chinese immigrant families in New Zealand, and in Chinese families living in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 200 respondents. In total, 100 families have been chosen from each of these countries. The data were collected by the snowball sampling method across 11 different products and four decision-making stages.

Findings

The results of this research show that cultural assimilation does have an influence on parental perceptions of teen's influence on family decision making. Chinese immigrants' teenage children in New Zealand were perceived as having more influence within the family than their peers in Chinese families living in China.

Research limitations/implications

The research used a sample size of only 100 respondents from each country. Furthermore, it used snowball sampling and mid-income group families only.

Practical implications

These findings help marketers to gain a better understanding of the influence of cultural assimilation, and use specific marketing communication and promotion strategies.

Originality/value

The paper empirically demonstrates that Chinese parents living in China and Chinese immigrant parents living in New Zealand perceive their children's involvement in family purchase decision differently. Chinese immigrant parents perceive that their children are becoming assimilated with New Zealand culture. This is the first ever study done on Chinese Immigrant families living in New Zealand and Chinese families living in China by collecting and using the cross-culture data from New Zealand and China.

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Agustinus Bandur

The purpose of this paper is to examine the current school‐based management (SBM) policy reform in Indonesia, with an emphasis on the impacts of shifting authority and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the current school‐based management (SBM) policy reform in Indonesia, with an emphasis on the impacts of shifting authority and responsibility to school level, as well as challenges confronted by the school council members, followed by remedial measures to minimize the problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employed a mixed‐method research design comprising an extensive empirical survey followed by semi‐structured and focused group interviews and examination of relevant documents. The data reported here are on the basis of an empirical survey involving 504 school council members from Ngada‐Flores, followed by 42 interviews and focus group discussion (FGD) with all relevant stakeholders.

Findings

The research findings demonstrate how devolution of power and authority to school level can create partnership in participatory school decision making in terms of setting a school mission, shared‐vision, annual programs, school budget, school textbooks, school buildings, school‐based curriculum and even students’ discipline policies. In turn, devolving power and authority to school level has created several changes in schools, including in‐school culture changes, and increased participation of school communities. These factors have led to the improvements in teaching‐learning environments and student achievements.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study are specific to the context of Ngada‐Flores, Indonesia. The possibility for the general applicability of the findings is limited by the scope, the sample, and the cultural context of this study. Accordingly, even though there could be common features, the findings may not have general applicability to other systems.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that capacity building in school level is required for the effective implementation of SBM policies and programs, including in‐service training, regular professional development sessions and workshops on effective school leadership and management, as well as school development planning.

Originality/value

This paper could be significant because of the absence of similar studies in the Indonesian context. The findings could be helpful in informing practitioners, the local and national authorities and all those interested in school education on how SBM with devolution of power and authority to school‐level decision makers assists in‐school improvements and student achievements, as well as problems and challenges confronted by school leaders in the implementation of SBM.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Neena Sondhi and Rituparna Basu

The study aims to explore the evolving status of children as active consumers in the emerging Indian market by assessing their impact on family buying practices across…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore the evolving status of children as active consumers in the emerging Indian market by assessing their impact on family buying practices across distinct parental clusters.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a structured questionnaire to draw a quota sample of 136 urban Indian parents across four child segments from two Indian metropolitan cities to understand their attitudes towards parenting and the consequent empowerment of their children for actively participating in family purchase decisions around varied children’s product categories.

Findings

Exploratory factor analysis reveals five well-defined parental attitudes towards child rearing. The attitudinal factors are used to define three discrete parental clusters, namely, time-pressed parents, child-centric parents and socially influenced parents. The demographic and psychographic profiles of the clusters expose the significant influence of the educated and affluent parents in empowering their children as more active influencers/consumers. The role of children as independent buyers of eatables and toys over other categories is also re-established.

Research limitations/implications

The diversity of Indian parents both in terms of their family structure and attitude towards parenting significantly deliver decisive signals for market-specific segmentation strategies. The uniformity in their shopping frequency and increasing child involvement in family purchases also highlight the opportunities ahead.

Originality/value

Empirical evidences on the growing role of children in family purchases and their transformation into active consumer in an evolving market adds to the existing under-represented family consumption literature with more market-specific insights.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2018

Mengwei Tu

Abstract

Details

Education, Migration and Family Relations between China and the UK: The Transnational One-Child Generation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-673-0

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Aviv Shoham and Vassilis Dalakas

This study replicated an earlier study conducted in the USA and examined Israeli families’ decision making regarding various products and decisionmaking stages. The…

5513

Abstract

This study replicated an earlier study conducted in the USA and examined Israeli families’ decision making regarding various products and decisionmaking stages. The results revealed that teenage children have influence over family purchases, particularly for products relevant to them (like cereal and vacations) and during the initiation stage. Moreover, consistent with the ranking of Israel as a low power‐distance country, Israeli teens had higher influence than US teens on family decisions.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 8000