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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Gemma Unwin, Nick LeMesurier, Niyati Bathia and Shoumitro Deb

The aim of the research was to scope issues of concern at transition for young people with learning disabilities and mental health problems/challenging behaviour from the…

288

Abstract

The aim of the research was to scope issues of concern at transition for young people with learning disabilities and mental health problems/challenging behaviour from the perspective of parent carers, using a focus group interview consisting of ten participants, including one facilitator and administrative support. The interview was tape‐recorded, transcribed and thematically coded using Microsoft Word and NVivo. Two case vignettes were used to stimulate the discussion. Several themes emerged from analysis of the transcripts: access to information about rights and the services available for their son or daughter, and conflicts between carers and professionals. The experience of parent carers of people with learning disabilities is still not well understood. By understanding the views and experiences of parent carers, transition can be facilitated and concerned parties can work together to achieve better results.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Carol Davies and Jeremy Dale

Parental satisfaction with paediatric home care has previously been found to be high and the results presented here confirm this finding. This study is unique in that a…

443

Abstract

Parental satisfaction with paediatric home care has previously been found to be high and the results presented here confirm this finding. This study is unique in that a well defined population from one geographical area was studied before and after the introduction of the new home care service. Referrers included general practitioners, doctors in emergency care and out‐patient clinics, referring children for a wide range of acute conditions. Compared with hospital admission only half the number of adverse effects on children and families were reported by parents. Interest has been increasing in alternative service provision to prevent or reduce paediatric hospital admissions to avoid adverse effects on children and families. This study examined the views of parents experiencing hospital at home compared with hospital referral between 1999 and 2001 across the whole spectrum of acute clinical conditions. Hospital at home was the preferred service for a wide range of illnesses. Parents and carers identified extension of hospital at home to 24‐hour cover as a future preference. Parental preference for paediatric hospital at home for acute illness was confirmed.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Jacqueline Harding

This paper aims to investigate how, where and when parents are mediating their children’s media activities and with which particular device. It also explores whether…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how, where and when parents are mediating their children’s media activities and with which particular device. It also explores whether parents are identifying specific help in this area and questions where they might seek advice (should they need it). Furthermore, it investigates parentsviews regarding a pilot, free online TV channel dedicated to advice through discussion with experts, parents and children.

Design/methodology/approach

This small-scale study uses charts and semi-structured interviews to explore the views of parents/carers to better understand lived experiences in relation to mediated digital parenting in the home. The methodology was also designed so that findings will inform further production of relevant content for a video-based resource.

Findings

Although this study was limited in duration and scope, the results clearly support earlier research (Livingstone, 2018a, 2018b; Ofcom, 2017) regarding the desperation parents feel through not being able to access appropriate advice in the way they want it. Furthermore, findings provide overwhelming support for the potential benefits of relevant predominantly visually-based online content/advice.

Practical implications

The study raises questions about the empowerment of parents/carers in their own digital skills as a way of transferring confidence to their children, in navigating their way through the educational and social affordances and online safety issues through the use of accessible filmed content.

Originality/value

The findings show that issues, such as online safety and related behavioural pressures, remain key for parents and that there is an increasing need for more targeted support and ways to empower parents/grandparents with skills to enhance children’s digital agency. Furthermore, it offers an insight into ways in which styles of “enabling mediation” in the digital age may be analysed and reveals some of the day to day challenges parents face.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

This paper seeks to present the viewpoint of a family carer of a young man with autism.

500

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present the viewpoint of a family carer of a young man with autism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the author's views and experiences of caring for a family member with autism. It is a personal account of the impact that “autism” can have on family carers.

Findings

It is a long, arduous, lonely and silent journey that carers travel, long before any recognition comes with diagnosis.

Originality/value

The paper provides a unique insight into the day to day experiences of a family carer of a person with autism.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Rob Greig

This case study considers the current state of knowledge about developing effective, high quality services for people with learning disabilities, with particular emphasis…

Abstract

This case study considers the current state of knowledge about developing effective, high quality services for people with learning disabilities, with particular emphasis on ‘social care’ provision. It questions why services across much of the country fail to respond to the lessons from research and evaluation which, combined with a greater emphasis on partnership between all stakeholders in services, could result in substantially improved outcomes for service users.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Elsie Whittington

Research within the fields of youth sexuality and safeguarding, and ethical governance more broadly, has traditionally prioritised risk aversion over the rights of young…

Abstract

Purpose

Research within the fields of youth sexuality and safeguarding, and ethical governance more broadly, has traditionally prioritised risk aversion over the rights of young people to participate in and shape research. This excludes younger people from setting agendas and directly communicating their lived experience to those in power. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes and draws upon findings from an innovative two year participatory action research study exploring sexual consent with young people through embedded and participatory research across seven sites. The project was designed with young people and practised non-traditional approaches to research consent. As well as co-producing research data, the findings highlight how methods of co-enquiry and being explicit about the research consent process enabled young people to develop competence that can be applied in other contexts.

Findings

The paper addresses ethical tensions between young people’s rights to participation and protection. It argues that alongside robust safeguarding procedures, there is equal need to develop robust participation and engagement strategies with an explicit focus on young people’s competence, agency and rights to participate regardless of the perceived sensitivity of the topic.

Originality/value

The paper concludes with proposals for future youth-centred research practice. These relate to research design, ethical governance processes around risk and sensitive topics, emphasis on working collaboratively with young people and practitioners, a greater focus on children and young people’s rights – including Gillick competence and fluid models of consent. In doing so, it presents an essential point of reference for those seeking to co-produce research with young people in the UK and beyond.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2011

Lynne Zwink

– This paper presents the viewpoint of a parent of two children with Fragile X syndrome.

156

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents the viewpoint of a parent of two children with Fragile X syndrome.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the author's views of her and her family's experience of Fragile X syndrome.

Findings

The paper provides the author's perspective on the impact that the condition has had on family life.

Originality/value

The paper provides a unique insight into the day-to-day experiences of a parent of two children with Fragile X syndrome.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 January 2011

Axel Kaehne

Transitions for young people with intellectual disabilities have received much attention from researchers. Little is known, however, about how mental health services link…

Abstract

Transitions for young people with intellectual disabilities have received much attention from researchers. Little is known, however, about how mental health services link with existing transition partnerships and what the potential service gaps are for young people with intellectual disabilities. Eight mental health professionals in three local authorities in Wales were interviewed to sketch potential research themes in this area. Our findings revealed a remarkable lack of engagement of mental health professionals with transition partnerships for young people with intellectual disabilities, and significant service gaps. The insufficient integration of mental health services in transition planning may contribute to disruptive transitions for young people with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Further research should examine how best to involve mental health services in transition partnerships for young people.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2010

Sarah Bernard, Suzannah Gratton and Natasa Momcilovic

This case report highlights the importance of the role of the family in supporting a young person with a developmental disability. The young person discussed has a complex…

226

Abstract

This case report highlights the importance of the role of the family in supporting a young person with a developmental disability. The young person discussed has a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with co‐morbid physical health problems. Her family have coped with a number of events in CR's life, ensuring that she has always had their support and understanding. At the time of transition there is a risk of failure to understand the complexities of the role of the family in CR's life. The implications will be discussed.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Muthukumar Kannabiran and Sarah Bernard

This case study highlights issues surrounding the transition of a 19‐year‐old man with moderate learning disabilities and a psychotic illness from child and adolescent…

Abstract

This case study highlights issues surrounding the transition of a 19‐year‐old man with moderate learning disabilities and a psychotic illness from child and adolescent mental health services to adult services. He had undergone hemispherectomy following Rasmussen's encephalitis at a young age. Important issues in transition of care are discussed.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

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