Search results

1 – 10 of over 19000
Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Yi-Ping Shih, Wen-Hsu Lin and Chin-Chun Yi

This chapter aims to delineate the indigenous pattern of parental involvement in Taiwan by investigating the effects of specific practices in schools and in the family…

Abstract

This chapter aims to delineate the indigenous pattern of parental involvement in Taiwan by investigating the effects of specific practices in schools and in the family, such as school selection, school involvement, preparing a study place at home, and providing nutritious food.

We use two waves of data from the Taiwan Youth Project (2000, 2003) to examine how parental involvement varies between dual- and single-earner families, and we further demonstrate how sons and daughters have different access in terms of recognizing their parents’ effort, and how children’s subjective appraisals promote their academic performance with respect to test scores.

We find that dual-earner families have higher incomes, higher educational levels, and have fewer children than single-earner ones. Our multivariate analyses show that parental involvement does increase youngsters’ Basic Competence Test (BCT) score. However, we are unable to find any direct or indirect effects from parental employment status on BCT scores. Further analysis indicates that the relationship between parental school involvement and BCT score is only significant among dual-earner families, but not for the single-earner ones. In addition, our multiple group analysis reveals that sons’ BCT scores are affected more by parents’ school involvement, whereas daughters’ are affected more by special home provision. Our findings from adolescents’ subjective responses imply that sons may be more responsive to a non-familial context in contrast with daughters, who react more positively to familial provision.

Details

The Work-Family Interface: Spillover, Complications, and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-112-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2006

Hyunjoon Park

Numerous studies in the United States have found that various forms of parental involvement in children's education positively affect children's educational outcomes such…

Abstract

Numerous studies in the United States have found that various forms of parental involvement in children's education positively affect children's educational outcomes such as high school dropout (McNeal, 1999; Teachman, Paasch, & Carver, 1997), post-secondary educational attainment (Sandefur, Frisco, Faulkner, & Park, 2004), and academic achievement (Epstein, 2001; Ho Sui-Chu & Willms, 1996; Muller, 1993, 1995). Researchers distinguish two dimensions of parental involvement depending on the context in which parents become involved (Downey, 2002; Ho Sui-Chu & Willms, 1996; Muller & Kerbow, 1993).1 The first dimension of parental involvement represents what parents do at home and studies particularly have focused on the extent to which parent–child discussion on children's schooling, parenting style, and parents’ monitoring or rule-setting affect student's academic achievement and behavior. The other dimension of parental involvement includes parent participation in school activities and parent–teacher interaction. In particular, the literature has extensively examined the effects of attending parent–teacher organization (PTO) meetings or school events, and contacting teachers and school officials.

Details

The Impact of Comparative Education Research on Institutional Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-308-2

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Shun Wing Ng and Tai Hoi Theodore Lee

The purpose of this paper is to report on a case study of 93 parents’ attitude toward their involvement at various levels of school education in a special school. It also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a case study of 93 parents’ attitude toward their involvement at various levels of school education in a special school. It also examines the relations between parents’ education backgrounds and different levels of parental involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted quantitative research approach. A questionnaire composed of 30 items under six scales was developed with reference to Ng’s (1999) six-level Model of Home-School Cooperation which was adopted to frame the study.

Findings

The study indicates that parents’ inclined to be involved more outside the school including “two-way communication,” “supervision of children at home” and “participation in parent organizations and activities” than that inside the school such as “volunteering,” “providing advice on school policies” and “participating in decision making.”

Research limitations/implications

In spite of its small scale in a case-study special school, the paper does not aim at generalization but illuminates how parental involvement was carried out.

Practical implications

The study carries implications for school management and policy makers when promoting and implementing parental involvement in special schools.

Originality/value

For the school personnel, a total and positive relationship could help enhance efficient and effective management of education. Second, more resources should be provided by the Education Bureau for special schools to educate parents and subsidize their involvement. Third, more training opportunities regarding knowledge and skills of parental involvement should be provided for frontline teachers.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

James Griffith

Strategies to increase parent involvement and its beneficial effects, in particular, among parents whose children traditionally have low academic achievement, abound in…

4279

Abstract

Strategies to increase parent involvement and its beneficial effects, in particular, among parents whose children traditionally have low academic achievement, abound in the educational literature. Yet, conspicuously absent is an empirical examination of the relation of principal behaviors on parent involvement. The present study analyzed survey data from principals regarding their behaviors and the relation of their behavior to survey data from parents regarding involvement in their children’s education. Among schools having higher concentrations of socioeconomically‐disadvantaged and non‐English‐speaking students, the roles of master teacher and missionary were associated with higher levels of parent involvement and the role of the gamesman with lower levels of parent involvement. Results suggest that the effectiveness of principal roles is dependent on the needs and life circumstances of socioeconomically‐disadvantaged school populations.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Zehava Rosenblatt and Daniel Peled

Using structural equations modeling, this study explored the association between school ethical climate (characterized by values of caring, rules and a professional code…

3618

Abstract

Using structural equations modeling, this study explored the association between school ethical climate (characterized by values of caring, rules and a professional code) and two types of parental involvement: cooperation‐based and conflict‐based. The mediating effects of perceived parental influence and trust and parents’ socioeconomic (SES) level were considered as well. School‐level data were obtained from 157 teachers representing 20 elementary schools in Israel, and individual‐level data were obtained from 936 parents. Results showed that an ethical climate characterized by rules and a professional code was more common and more strongly related to parental involvement than a caring climate. Different patterns were detected for the two SES groups: high‐SES parents tended to be less involved (both cooperation‐wise and conflict‐wise) than low‐SES ones when the school climate was perceived as more ethical. Results have implications for research on school values and school culture.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Fiona S. Baker and Rida Blaik Hourani

The purpose of this exploratory study is to explore parent and school administrator perspectives on the value and nature of parent involvement in the city of Abu Dhabi…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory study is to explore parent and school administrator perspectives on the value and nature of parent involvement in the city of Abu Dhabi through their perceptions of roles and responsibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is conducted in a random purposive sample of Public–Private Partnership schools during Abu Dhabi Education Council’s school reform.

Findings

Findings show that while both administrators and parents agree on the value of parental involvement, the perceptions of their own and each others’ roles and responsibilities means that parent involvement is characterized by unfulfilled expectations.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made to arrive at realistic roles and responsibilities for parent involvement and recommendations for a model of mutually responsive practice to evolve within a policy framework, with the support of ADEC, and informed by international and locally based research.

Originality/value

The paper sheds light on a new educational dimension beyond curricula and instruction.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2006

Richard C. Hunter

Parent involvement is a major component of several school reform initiatives, including the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 commonly referred to as Title I…

Abstract

Parent involvement is a major component of several school reform initiatives, including the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 commonly referred to as Title I. Parent involvement is also an important provision in the latest reauthorization of the Leave No Child Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001, PL 107-110. Important research on parent involvement is presented in this chapter. Also, a brief discussion of the role parent involvement has played in several important school reform initiatives, such as decentralization, community control, and compensatory education are discussed. Finally, specific recommendations are given for school leaders, superintendents, and principals, on how to use parent involvement to help schools and students make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), a requirement of NCLB.

Details

No Child Left Behind and other Federal Programs for Urban School Districts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-299-3

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Shoshana Ben-Tov and Shlomo Romi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between parentsinvolvement related to their alertness of what happens in school and their identification with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between parentsinvolvement related to their alertness of what happens in school and their identification with school and their children’s attitudes toward school, social adjustment, self-efficacy and academic achievements.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were answered by 339 parents and 343 students, and yielded 34 parents whose levels of identification with school and alertness were low, and 57 parents whose levels were high. 10; path analysis was used (structural equation model). The theoretical model was tested by a software AMOS 7.0.

Findings

Involvement characterized by low identification and alertness predicted a direct, significant and negative relationship with children’s self-efficacy; alertness predicted a direct, significant and negative relationship with self-efficacy. The group with high identification and alertness predicted a direct, significant and positive relationship of their identification with children’s self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is recommended because of the small sample in this study. In addition, especially it is recommended to add to the study parents whose identification is low and their alertness is high.

Practical implications

The way to solve problems is not by mutual accusations, but by trusting each other. Parents and school must create useful communication channels and forums for straightening out issues and find solution through cooperation.

Originality/value

This paper reveals that parents’ alienation from school is a predictor of their children’s negative functioning in school. This document is intended for school principals, educational staff and parents to improve students’ functioning.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Peter Kiplangat Koross, Moses Waithanji Ngware and Anthony Kiplangat Sang

The management of secondary schools in Kenya has faced a number of challenges over the past few years. These challenges have been manifested in the many ways including…

2671

Abstract

Purpose

The management of secondary schools in Kenya has faced a number of challenges over the past few years. These challenges have been manifested in the many ways including lack of financial transparency, which culminate in unaffordable secondary schools fees. The aim of this paper is to present the findings of an investigation into the contribution of parents to the financial management of secondary schools in Kericho district of Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was exploratory in approach with a descriptive survey being used as a method of inquiry. A sample size of 30 (47 percent) was selected from 64 secondary schools in the district. From this sample, proportional sampling was then used to get seven provincial and 23 district schools into the sample. Purposive sampling was used to get the schools from each category and the respondents from each school into the sample. Questionnaires and interview schedules were used to solicit information and perceptions from principals and students.

Findings

The findings of this study indicated that Principals and students perceived parental involvement in financial management as present to some degree in most schools. The results also indicated that parental involvement had positive influence on financial management outcomes. Since schools' finance is critical in school management outcomes, it is therefore important for education stakeholders to increase parental involvement.

Practical implications

Parental participation can have positive impacts on the processes of teaching and learning with active and frequent contacts between parents and school administration improving school's financial accountability and transparency. Participation will strengthen the partnership between parent teacher associations, community and school administration in addition to democratizing school governance.

Originality/value

Based on the findings of the study, parental involvement in the area of financial management is still low in the district. It was also noted that parental involvement greatly influenced the way finances in schools were managed. From these observations, parental levels of involvement in the area of school finances affect financial transparency in schools.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Khalid Arar, Muhammed Abu Nasra and Hassan Alshafi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of parental involvement among 317 teachers in the Arab education system in Israel.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of parental involvement among 317 teachers in the Arab education system in Israel.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire measured teachers’ attitudes regarding parentsinvolvement in the school relating to pedagogy, resources, and control.

Findings

The findings show that Arab teachers perceive parentsinvolvement as related to pedagogy and resources rather than control. In addition, the research results revealed that young teachers in terms of age, and seniority of teaching, and teachers who are not members of the management team demonstrated a stronger perception of the pedagogy and control components than did older and senior teachers and teachers who are members of the management team. However, older and senior teachers and teachers who are members of the management team had a stronger perception that parental involvement related to resources than did young teachers and teachers who are not members of the management team.

Social implications

Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to our understandings of the different components that affect parental involvement in developing and minority societies.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 19000