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Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Emma Gilberthorpe

Global/national policy planning is guided by economic methods and predictions of growth, where indicators of success are measured according to a dominant view of progress…

Abstract

Global/national policy planning is guided by economic methods and predictions of growth, where indicators of success are measured according to a dominant view of progress and sustainable development. Yet, despite widespread ratification of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Peoples remain unrepresented in this dominant view. The structural and historical forces informing global policy thus inadvertently produce a pathway of development that is characterized by political, economic, and social exclusion where Indigenous Peoples’ agency, heritage, and culture remain marginalized. I argue that socio-cultural nuance (“the complete story”) is critical to policy planning if we are to honor the principal aim of the Sustainable Development Goals – “leave no-one behind”. This and other policy frameworks need an approach that is neither framed by Eurocentric objectives nor bound by measurable indicators. This requires consideration of Indigenous Worldviews in a way that mediates diverse social, economic, and political factors. In this chapter, I examine the limitations in current policy consultation practice, with a specific focus on the extractive industries sector, and examine the ways in which engagement with Indigenous Peoples’ “complete story” might inform policy in the pursuit of a sustainable development that leaves no-one behind and creates a bridge between dominant and marginalized forms of knowledge.

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Anthropological Enquiries into Policy, Debt, Business, and Capitalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-659-4

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 14 July 2015

Political and economic outlook for Papua New Guinea.

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DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB200942

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Expert briefing
Publication date: 17 June 2019

The economic outlook for Papua New Guinea.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

John Asafu‐Adjaye

Takes a critical look at a current model of fisheries management which is based on principles related to Hardin’s “Tragedy of the Commons”. According to this model, where…

Abstract

Takes a critical look at a current model of fisheries management which is based on principles related to Hardin’s “Tragedy of the Commons”. According to this model, where access to a fishery is free, it is not in the interest of the community to limit their fishing effort. To prevent over‐fishing and eventual destruction of fish stocks, fisheries managers in Papua New Guinea (PNG) have concentrated their efforts on imposing limits on fishing effort. Argues that such methods are bound to fail because they are imposed by outsiders and are alien to the local communities. Argues that customary marine tenure systems have a better chance of success in the management of local fisheries resources because they are community‐based and are derived from kinship and lineage structures. Advocates that, rather than overlooking such systems, governments must strengthen them to enable them to play their role in sustainable fisheries management.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 27 no. 7/8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Abstract

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Creating Shared Value to get Social License to Operate in the Extractive Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-924-3

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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Graham Hassall

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Government and Public Policy in the Pacific Islands
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-616-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

Ernest A. Stallworthy and Om P. Kharbanda

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management, the project manager has a crucial role to play. This monograph assesses the requirements of project…

Abstract

In the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better management, the project manager has a crucial role to play. This monograph assesses the requirements of project management in terms of training and experience, demonstrates what sort of person the project manager should be, and also the role that should be played by the project team. In order to illustrate the manner in which the essential qualities in both the project manager and his team are displayed in action a number of completed projects worldwide are reviewed. Both successful projects and disastrous projects are used to demonstrate the way in which the problems encountered in real life can be met and overcome. In conclusion both the prospects and the problems that the future may hold for the project manager are assessed.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2017

Stephanie Perkiss and Karen Handley

The purpose of this paper is to explore economic conditions of contemporary society to provide insight into the ways in which the consequences of disaster, including…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore economic conditions of contemporary society to provide insight into the ways in which the consequences of disaster, including environmental migration, are accentuated.

Design/methodology/approach

This research draws on Zygmunt Bauman’s theory of liquid modernity and notions of development to analyse disaster. From the analysis, a new concept, liquid development, is proposed and critiqued as a contributing factor leading to severe contemporary disaster.

Findings

Liquid development provides a new way of making sense of the conditions and consequences of economic growth and a business as usual attitude. It further provides a framework to explore the potential disaster of environmental migration in the Pacific Islands arising from liquid development driven climate change-induced sea level rise.

Research limitations/implications

Analysing these conditions provides greater understanding of the resulting impact of disaster, creating awareness and informing the need for accountability and social policy. This study aims to contribute to further practical and research enquiry that will challenge liquid developers to reconsider their impact and to accept responsibility for vulnerable members of society as part of their business as usual structure.

Originality/value

This paper adds to Bauman’s understanding of the consequences of globalisation through the construct of liquid development. It also continues his debate by giving awareness to the global issue of environmental migration.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 37 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Fred Robins

The purpose of this paper is to contrast the business risks of seeking to hide “questionable” corporate activities with the benefits of achieving high levels of corporate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contrast the business risks of seeking to hide “questionable” corporate activities with the benefits of achieving high levels of corporate transparency.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarises three well‐documented cases of corporate malfeasance, simply and sequentially. Each is analysed separately.

Findings

The paper finds, in each case, that once the concealed “truth” comes out, the companies are in a much worse position than if they had come clean when initially challenged. The generalised finding is that once pressures mount, what is intentionally concealed tends to become exposed, with unanticipated and powerful negative consequences.

Practical implications

To minimise business risk, managers are well advised to refrain from doing things behind a veil of secrecy and, instead, opt for greater transparency. Since what is hidden seldom remains hidden, a “policy” of corporate transparency is often in their interest. The lesson is that when under public pressure, for whatever reason, facts, risks and relationships will out.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates how openness rather than secrecy can reduce business risk and raise ethical standards at the same time.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Abstract

Details

Anthropological Enquiries into Policy, Debt, Business, and Capitalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-659-4

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