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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Paolo Gaiardelli and Lucrezia Songini

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the fit between the strategy of service centres and their business model (BM) and to identify the BM components' characteristics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the fit between the strategy of service centres and their business model (BM) and to identify the BM components' characteristics and links that allow it to stand out in terms of service delivery and business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies an inductive qualitative multiple case study approach through the empirical analysis of top-performing Italian service centres operating in the Medium–Heavy Commercial Vehicle sector.

Findings

Research findings underline that the BM components of top performers are consistent amongst each other and with the adopted strategy and make a positive impact on the firm's performance. In particular, top performers are characterised by a solid financial structure based on equity, formalised and flexible organisational structures and processes, clarity in strategic direction and long-term orientation, grounded capabilities, competences and skills, trustful relationships with main service partners and a comprehensive set of managerial mechanisms.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents some limitations, typical of qualitative research based on case studies. Future works may include other dimensions of performance for identifying top performers, and extend the empirical analysis to different sectors and national contexts.

Originality/value

This paper supports the relevance of contingency theory – particularly the strategy-structure-performance paradigm – in the analysis of the role of a BM in successful servitization strategies of service centres. It highlights that the BMs of the top-performing companies are characterised by some common elements. From a practical perspective, the authors provide insights that can be useful for designing successful service-based BMs for service networks.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Néstor F. Ayala, Paolo Gaiardelli, Giuditta Pezzotta, Marie Anne Le Dain and Alejandro G. Frank

The purpose of this study is to analyse the effect of different forms of service supplier involvement on the service business dimensions necessary for servitisation and on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyse the effect of different forms of service supplier involvement on the service business dimensions necessary for servitisation and on the resulting servitisation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Three different configurations of service supplier involvement are considered in this study: black box (service design and execution driven by the service supplier), grey box (joint service design) and white box (service design driven by the product firm). The study analyses their contribution by means of a cross-sectional quantitative survey with 104 Brazilian and Italian firms using multivariate analysis of variance.

Findings

Companies that adopted the grey box configuration presented the best results in servitisation. White and black box may offer different benefits depending on the service business dimension that the company chooses to emphasise.

Originality/value

The results show which type of service supplier involvement is more effective for servitisation. The empirical data demonstrate that a joint service design (grey box involvement) is the best approach, but the paper discusses limitations for its implementation and alternatives regarding the two other types of service supplier involvement. The findings contribute to the discussion on the role of service suppliers in servitisation and provide empirical evidence to support operations managers in deciding on how to organise their service supply chain when aiming for servitisation.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Guilherme Tortorella, Paulo A. Cauchick-Miguel and Paolo Gaiardelli

The purpose of this paper is to propose a methodology to support the Hoshin Kanri (HK) process taking into account the variance of senior managers’ perspective regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a methodology to support the Hoshin Kanri (HK) process taking into account the variance of senior managers’ perspective regarding the relationships among objectives, key performance indicators and continuous improvement (CI) projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A four-step methodology incorporates the A3 report into the HK, whose deployment was weighted by the variability among managers’ perception about the importance of each decision. This methodology was applied in a market-leader Mexican auto parts manufacturing company that is undergoing a Lean Manufacturing (LM) implementation.

Findings

The results indicate that the proposed methodology provides an easier approach to consolidate different perspectives and weight the importance of CI projects. Moreover, it minimizes the possibility of managerial conflicts or the influence of a determined senior manager on others’ opinions during the deployment and prioritization.

Practical implications

This work may be of great interest to managers, consultants and professionals who deal with the implementation of LM and wish to prioritize the importance of CI projects within the perspective of HK.

Originality/value

HK provides a systematic approach to integrate strategic management with daily routine management through an adequate deployment of organizational policies to all levels. However, companies usually struggle with several issues such as the style of senior managers and consensus establishment among different opinions, which emphasizes the relevance of the proposed methodology in this study.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2018

Paolo Gaiardelli, Barbara Resta and Stefano Dotti

Although lean popularity is rapidly growing, its implementation is far from problem-free and companies may experience difficulties in sustaining long-term success. On this…

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1034

Abstract

Purpose

Although lean popularity is rapidly growing, its implementation is far from problem-free and companies may experience difficulties in sustaining long-term success. On this premises, the purpose of this paper is to understand to what extent human factors, affected by the implementation of both hard (defined as technical and analytical tools) and soft (concerning people and relations) lean practices, play a key role in achieving long-term superior performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis of the relationships between lean practices implementation, human factors and operational performance is carried out in a single exploratory case study. A retrospective approach is adopted to trace the changes of human and operational performance before, during and after the introduction of lean management (LM) implementation. In particular, a mixed method concurrent design merging results of a qualitative analysis with data collected from a survey is selected to provide a more realistic benefit in the exploration of the proposed research questions.

Findings

The results show a short-term direct relationship between the implementation of lean practices (hard and soft) and physical work environment and job characteristics, directly connected to operational outcome. In the long term, operational performance is influenced by employee behaviour outcome and conditioned by physical work environment and job characteristics with the mediating effect of individual characteristics.

Practical implications

The proposed model supports the building of a roadmap for LM implementation, taking into account the role of the human factors to achieve superior operational performance. Moreover, it helps managers to implement a monitoring system to check how social and technical components of a LM system evolve over time. Finally, it supports the definition of specific training programs, tailored for specific workers’ types.

Originality/value

This paper extends theory in LM, highlighting how hard and soft lean practices have to interact to enable a successful LM implementation.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Servitization Strategy and Managerial Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-845-1

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Sergio Cavalieri, Paolo Gaiardelli and Stefano Ierace

The purpose of the paper is to overcome the limitations of the current models available in the literature in terms of relation and consistency between business strategy…

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4376

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to overcome the limitations of the current models available in the literature in terms of relation and consistency between business strategy, service chain configuration and performance measurement systems, and on the alignment between strategic, tactical and operational levels of after‐sales decision‐making processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a literature review of after‐sales performance measurement systems and provides a first validation of the proposed integrated model through industrial case studies related to the provision of durable consumer goods in a business to consumer scenario.

Findings

The paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the factors which influence the performance of after‐sales, in order to allow enterprises to consistently design their corporate after‐sales service strategic performances with those required at operational levels within a service chain.

Research limitations/implications

Further development must be carried out in order to: enlarge the sample of companies and cases where the model can be applied, with a specific extension on a business‐to‐business industry; extend the model to the whole supply and service chain; enrich the framework in order to consider other aspects, as empathy; and develop a full integration with the SCOR model, including the definition of best practices.

Originality/value

The integration of the strategic and operational views subsumed by the framework would allow enterprises in relating more consistently their corporate After‐sales strategic and operational performance within a service chain and to assess the cause and effect relationship between operational drivers and financial and competitive results.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 56 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Abstract

Details

Servitization Strategy and Managerial Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-845-1

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Daniela Andreini, Jari Salo, Robert Wendelin, Giuditta Pezzotta and Paolo Gaiardelli

Productization, defined as the standardization of the production and delivery processes of services, is an approach that many service companies undertake, moving from…

Abstract

Purpose

Productization, defined as the standardization of the production and delivery processes of services, is an approach that many service companies undertake, moving from relationship-intensive customer projects toward selling specific standardized offerings. In contrast to research on servitization, little in-depth research is available on the effects of this change of approach on the buyer-seller relationship. The purpose of this paper is to narrow this gap by providing evidence of the outcomes of productization in a corporate bank which has been serving Tier 1 customers for more than 15 years.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the IMP Group approach, this research identifies how productization affects buyer-seller relationships. In total, 37 key informant interviews were conducted on both sides of the buyer-seller relationship.

Findings

This research identified direct effects of productization relevant to buyer-seller relationships, and as many indirect effects through internal organizational processes. Productized service companies should develop their relationships with customers, by separating the standardization of the internal productization processes from the external relationship-based activities.

Originality/value

This paper contribute to the literature, exploring the long-term consequences of productization of services for the buyer-seller relationships.

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

N. Saccani, L. Songini and P. Gaiardelli

To analyse the role of after‐sales services in manufacturing contexts, and the related after‐sales performance measurement systems.

Downloads
5853

Abstract

Purpose

To analyse the role of after‐sales services in manufacturing contexts, and the related after‐sales performance measurement systems.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study research was performed in the automotive, household appliance, IT and consumer electronics industries. The sample is made up of 48 firms with after‐sales operations in Italy.

Findings

The role attributed to after‐sales activities in the IT and consumer electronics and household appliance industries shows an orientation to improve company image, customer satisfaction and retention (marketing focus). A different situation characterises the companies studied in the automotive industry. In most firms, however, measurement systems are quite simple and short‐term oriented, especially in the IT and consumer electronics and household appliance industries. The measurement of non‐financial performance emphasises effectiveness rather than efficiency, and the automotive industry, on the whole, presents more advanced measurement systems, together with more integrated strategic management of after‐sales. The household appliance industry, on the other hand, due to the significant presence of SMEs, is characterised by less sophisticated performance measurement systems.

Originality/value

Provides a representation of current empirical practices in after‐sales role and performance measurement, a topic insufficiently covered by conceptual and empirical research.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 55 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Abstract

Details

Servitization Strategy and Managerial Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-845-1

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